Regard to the inhibition of biofilm formation in the presence of 1 mg/mL of EOs and fractions (Table 6), the fraction F2LS and the oils from A. gratissima and C. articulatus demonstred the highest inhibition, respectively, on F. nucleatum (62.29%) and P. gingivalis (44.41%), S. mitis (9%) and C. albicans (28.08%) and S. sanguis (63.96%). Since no significative difference (p ≤ 0,05) was observed between the action of the C. articulatus crude oil and the fraction F2LS against F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis biofilms, the crude oils from C. articulatus and A. gratissima was chosen for further assays in the range of 0.0048 – 1 mg/mL (Table 7). In this condition, A. gratissima inhibited the formation of S. mitis biofilm only at 1 mg/mL (9%), even though this activity was superior to that of the chlorhexidine. On the other hand, the biofilm inhibition by C. articulatus oil was proportional to the concentration employed, and also similar or superior to standards used.
Because essential oils are obviously all-natural, it might be easy to assume that they're gentle and largely unreactive. This isn't the case at all—by definition, it's extremely potent stuff. "On average, they are up to 75 times more powerful than dried herbs," says Avery. As such, "essential oils must be handled with care." This means that a couple drops go a long way, and aside from very specific oils (more on that later), essential oils should always be diluted properly before applying them directly to skin. Whether or not essential oils should be ingested is actually a highly debated topic, and many argue that it isn't safe unless specifically advised by a doctor or expert.

Tiffany, you raise an interesting point. While we can continue to counter unsafe EO instructions with credible research, that info may be more effective when directed at specific groups. I mean, if companies like YL are going to start targeting everything from Autism to ADHD to mental health issues, and pets too (all ads by their reps I've seen within the past month), then perhaps that's where the credible facts most need to be targeted, too. Also, let's recall that the FDA's rules on the matter state that no dietary supplement, including essential oils, can claim that they treat a disease. So these claims are a clear example of the old sales adage, "it's easier to ask forgiveness than permission".


This post is a definite BOOKMARK for me…I love all the info. My favorite essential oil to put in my burner is sweet orange – it just makes me so HAPPY! I read your response above about YLEO. I received a package of them as a gift a few years ago from a friend. I love them and have them in my studio all the time, but honestly I would never pay those prices. MLM completely scares me off of them too…just sharing my agreement with you 🙂
Delivering the freshest product with the highest level of quality control is our top priority, and as a result we only have a small portion of finished product on-hand at any given time. Additionally, growers who produce plants that are both Certified Organic and up to our personal standards are exceedingly rare, and the few growers we’re lucky enough to work with can only produce so much raw material at a time.
When washing clothes I use regular soap (haven’t looked into home made yet), and then put about 2 tablespoons of Epsom salt scented with a few drops of essential oils into the bottom of the washer before adding clothes. Then instead of using fabric softner I fill the dispenser with regular white vinegar. It keeps the washer from getting that funky smell and my clothes come out way softer. At first I was worried you would be able to smell the vinegar, but I have been doing this for 6 months now and you really can’t smell it! The Epsom salt doesn’t really have to have essential oil in it, the scent seems to rinse out in the wash but I like the little burst of scent you get when you dump it in, and use fairly cheap oils like citrus for it. If you want your clothes to actually smell of the oils you can get some wool dryer balls and add an oil of your choice before drying.
"My first visit, a local, very popular, natural food store. I went straight to the essential oils and, yep, he was right…the price was cheaper. I pick up the bottle and ask a friendly employee…”can you take these internally”? She responded with a quick, no. This is not for internal use. Hmmmm. Okay. I look on the bottle and sure enough. "Do not ingest."
Botanical Name. High quality essential oils should have the botanical or “scientific” name (genus and species of the plant) listed on the label. Beware that inferior oils will blend certain plant essential oils together that do not make a “healthy mix” and are therefore not good for your health. It is also common for some oils to be made from cheaper or less therapeutic plant species and then misleadingly labeled as “therapeutic” grade oil. Lavender oil is a prime example, where hybrid “lavandins” are often used instead of the genuine and authentic Lavandula augustifolia vera.
I agree heather- I LOVE DoTERRA oils!!!  I use them every day and we have never been healthier!  We have never had a bad reaction to them on our skin, even our little kids, because they are PURE.  I used YL all growing up and always had reactions to them, but the DoTERRA are amazing.  I also love that you can take most of them internally!  I used Oregano to kill strep throat I got last spring!  Can’t say enough good about them.  I especially love how the company is so in to education and helping you keep yourself and your family healthy. 
Additionally, inhaling scents bring the chemical - healing plant chemical,  or toxic synthetic chemical - straight into our lungs, while also bypassing the blood brain barrier and this can have nearly immediate effects on our neurological health. Again, this is one of the reasons why oils can be so powerful. We are able to utilize their healing benefits without needing to digest and assimilate anything. Easy entry. This is also why I advise using top quality oils for all oil applications, whether it's on your body or in your home.
I've been digging into this for over a year now, beginning last summer when I noticed a new multi-level essential oil company sweep into my social media feeds. What struck my curiosity at first was less about the oils and more about the controversy that seemed to surround them - the lawsuits, accusations and most important to me, questions being raised about quality.
Also, if you drink it, you should only use a glass or stainless steel container. Glass is highly preferred over the two and the easiest for cleaning out of the previous EO. The smell/taste of an EO tends to “linger” a bit. This is usually a good thing I would think in say aromatherapy but in this case not so much…unless of course you prefer to use the same EO each time.
As an aromatic food supplement, essential oils are a playground for the nose and probably safe in small quantities. They may be useful in modulating the mind-body connection, but as primary medical treatment for most disease conditions, there is no evidence to suggest they work. I’d recommend spending your hard-earned money on chemical compounds that do.
To find a therapeutic grade essential oil you will need to know its latin name and find it back on the bottle. The bottle also needs to have the name and address of the aupplier and a batch number. It is really not advised to use less than therapeutic grade in any skin, beauty or healthcare products as you are so much more likely to get adverse effects.
I was introduced to doTERRA a couple years ago. As an aromatherapist with a strong aversion to MLMs, and particularly essential oil MLMs, I had many questions, doubts, and hesitations. But, I bought a few, started using them, asked questions, did research into their sourcing, and listened to people who knew the owners to glean what I could about their integrity and purpose. I worried about their encouragement of internal and undiluted use of the essential oils since I had learned that this was not acceptable, except by someone qualified to determine proper use.

My extensive collection of essential oils contains many produced from wood, bark and/or heartwood, including Amyris, Cade (Prickly Juniper), Buddha Wood, Balsam gurjun, Peru Balsam, Atlas Cedarwood, Himalayan Cedarwood, Texas Cedarwood, Virginia Cedarwood, Cinnamon  Bark, Blue Cypress, Emerald Cypress, Balsam Fir, Guaiacwood, Ocean (Maritime) Pine, Ravensara aromatica, Ravintsara, Rosewood, Indian Sandalwood, Australian Sandalwood, Fijian Sandalwood, and Zanthoxylum.


Very simply, you want to read on the label — or information page for every oil — the true Latin name of the plant from which the oil was extracted, as well as the country from which the plant was harvested. Some companies will go further and tell you the method of extraction, the farming quality and also the chemical family of the oil. Plus seeing the batch number on the bottle helps you match it with its testing.

Allergens are almost always composed of proteins or polypeptides, which are relatively large molecules. There are no proteins or polypeptides in essential oils. In fact, nitrogen containing compounds are virtually non-existent in essential oils except in occasional trace amounts. Allergens are composed of large molecules. There are no large molecules in volatile or aromatic oils, otherwise they would be neither volatile or aromatic.
For example, Peppermint Essential Oil is used primarily as a flavoring for candies (i.e. Candy Canes), chewing gum and ice creams. It is often referred to on food ingredient labels as Oil of Peppermint or simply as Peppermint Oil. Because large food/candy manufacturers must produce a consistently flavored product, the intensity, aroma and overall flavor of the peppermint oil they use must remain consistent between each lot of oil that they purchase. Peppermint Oil manufacturers/distributors, therefore typically standardize the essential oils that they sell by establishing a blueprint of the percentage that each important constituent should reach within each essential oil. They then test the oil and then adjust the oil by adding or removing constituents until the resulting oil meets the ideal percentage.

Processing: Because of the growing popularity of essential oils and aromatherapy, there are many products on the market that may not be suitable for clinical use. They can be found nearly everywhere, from health food stores to discount stores to the Internet. These products may include pure essential oils, but sometimes they are adulterated or diluted. Such adulterations are difficult to identify.
He suggested an “old wives tale” remedy of tea tree oil in my shampoo. He is not typically an alternative medicine sort of guy, so I was surprised that he even suggested it. By golly it works! I have been a teacher for over thirty years –28 of them head lice free. I shared this idea with several colleagues and parents, and they all report the same results.
In conventional research studies, it is important to be able to determine exactly what caused the outcome. In essential oil therapy, the oils are sometimes applied with massage, which makes it difficult to tell whether or not the outcome was due to the essential oil alone, or the massage, or the combination. Also, essential oils are composed of hundreds of chemical constituents, and it is hard to determine which ones may have produced the desired effect.
Please take responsibility for your own health. Do not use any products that may cause a sensitivity or allergic reaction, or if sensitivity or allergy status to a product is unknown. Information provided is not given or intended to be a substitute or replacement for qualified medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. The owner(s), developer(s), producer(s) and maintainer(s) of this business, website, articles and its partners are not engaged in rendering professional or medical advice. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. The information presented in these pages should not be considered medical advice, and you should always consult a physician before beginning a new regimen, to be advised about complications, interactions, or contradictions to your current treatment, or altering your course of treatment.
A rash or burn from an essential oil is basically your skin screaming at you “hey, stop that and stop it now!” This is why you should always do a patch test on a small area of skin and wait a while to see what happens before you go all crazy and start bathing yourself in an essential oil that you have not used before. I know many aromatherapist recommend that you dilute the essential oils in a carrier oil for skin use. But no matter what concentration you use them at you should still do a patch test first for any new oils before moving on with the oil. Remember these are very concentrated solutions of organic molecules, let’s be safe rather than sorry.
On the bright side, dōTERRA sources their essential oils from growers across the globe who use a distillation process of low-heat steam distillation or cold extraction for select essential oils. Their global botanical network encompasses farmers and distillers in 40 different countries. dōTERRA offers full insight into the consumer journey from essential oil sourcing to delivering the bottle to a consumers’ hand, on their website Source to You. GC/MS quality reports are also available for download on this website.

Your on-line group will probably find quite a bit of information regarding the medical properties of plants by looking at sites/books about botony as well. I'm always amused when I tell people who ask how I got interested in this particular topic that it stems from reading a group of fictional books by Jean M. Auel called the Earth Children series (it starts with Clan of the Cave Bear) and other similar novels. I've always kinda wondered if I shouldn't have pursued botony as a career :) since it fascinated me so.
Thanks for this info; I have dabbled in herbs, oils, teas & decoctions for several decades. I had started to follow some blogs that were espousing a certain brand of eo, and reading just the comments on your page was very enlightening. I have a question: I have used aura cacia on occasion, and been satisfied, yet you don’t list that in your favored brands, and as you stated, their number of organics is large (largest of any supplier at several of my local health food stores). Wondering about your opinions about them. Thanks! Very useful information!!!
Disclaimer: The information provided is general and should not be taken as medical advice. Neither Bulk Apothecary or associated business entities guarantee the accuracy of the information. Please consult your doctor, especially if being used during pregnancy, before using this product. You are also encouraged to test the product to ensure that it meets your needs, before using for mass production.
I am a Young Living member. Young Living are the purest. They own their own farms, plant their own seeds, harvest the product, distill it, test it, and seal it. We are the only EO that can claim “seed to seal”. That is why it costs more. With YL you can be sure nothing hidden has been added. Other companies state to not ingest the oils. YL are completely safe for ingesting, for pets and children. I would rather pay more being I know where the oil comes from and how it is produced. If you would like to be a member you can get 24% off by signing up. My member #1904120

Unfortunately, there are some people that give companies like YL and similar a bad rap and thus many people feel they need to attack the companies rather than choose to address the individuals or simply provide good evidence based research on which people can make their decisions about essential oil use. We need good sound research out there of what these oils do and how to safely use them. Time spent bashing companies and their supporters is time wasted. It is projected that within the next 30 yrs cancer rates will hit a 50% incident rate. We already know toxins play a role in that, they also are contributing to decreased fertility and increased autoimmune disorders. Essential oils, and other natural health products, have the potential to replace those toxic products we use and counter damage done to our bodies. Let's put our time and energy there and work together to create healthy and well communities.
Not only is there no evidence that any essential oil can help with vision problems, age-related or otherwise, but placing any essential oil “in the eye” is extremely dangerous advice. Almost any undiluted essential oil coming into contact with the ocular membranes will be corrosive, possibly causing scarring of the cornea, and certainly causing significant pain.
Organic Farms. These farms practice organic cultivation, yet are not independently monitored. This is usually due to the lack of an agency in the area. Farms in more remote areas are usually unable to purchase the herbicides and fertilizers due to their cost. Personal contact with the farm is required to confirm that their cultivation is organic and clean, producing quality essential oils.

Thanks for your well researched and well written article. I am new to using essential oils for use in handmade bath and body products. I have friends who are all very into the Young Living and DoTerra oils and blather on about all the fab things about EOs (including using them internally). They also have been trying to get me to sign up to be a distribution rep to buy and use their oils in my bath products. As a scientist myself, I was highly skeptical about these claims (that's how I found your article). I believe in the whole "if it sounds too good to be true it probably is" and after doing my research, these MLMs are full of you know what. On top of it, their cost is outrageous when quality EOs are available for less cost and without having to buy a membership.


You’ll often see companies advertising their "therapeutic grade," "aromatherapy grade," or "medicinal grade" oils. Unfortunately for them, no such thing exists. "There is no formally approved grading standard used consistently throughout the essential oil industry," Lortscher says. Simply put, anyone who says that they have therapeutic grade or "certified" essential oils is lying. "That seal is nothing more than a commercial trademark. It isn’t backed by any scientific body."
Mountain Rose Herbs – (This is the brand that I use for my business and my home) All organic & pesticide-free, wild-crafted (if available), a wonderful company with great smelling essential oils, for really decent prices. This company strives to help the environment in every way and is a zero waste company. They are certified organic by OTCO and they source their essential oils from reputable distillers that they know personally and trust.
In a Chinese study, an ointment containing 5% tea tree oil was used by patients whose eyelash follicles were infested with “eyelash mites” (Demodex folliculorum). The ointment was applied to the lid margins with eyes closed, daily for 4 weeks after washing the face, and resulted in considerably less itching and fewer mites. Two of the 24 patients experienced slight irritation from the ointment. The 5% concentration was arrived at after preliminary testing using various dilutions on rabbit eyes (Gao et al 2012).
Speaking of “pure” essential oils, what exactly does that mean? Unfortunately, since there is no official or standardized definition of purity, it means very little with regards to the therapeutic value of any essential oil. Even an oil that is 100% pure may not have been processed correctly and may not provide more than a mild, pleasant fragrance.  Perfumery oils, fragrance oils, and flavorings often provide a stronger pleasant fragrance, but do not offer the therapeutic benefit of true essential oils. The amount of therapeutically effective chemical constituents in essential oils can vary from season to season, from year to year, or vary based on where the plant is grown. The essential oil extraction process also affects how this chemical balance is maintained from the time of plant harvesting to having the essential oil arrive in your home.

Some essential oils can be taken internally. The specific one I am thinking of is peppermint EO. It is known to treat IBS in several studies and can be taken also to combat headaches as well. Of course a topical application near the stomach and tummy is also known to be effect and application to the bottom of the feet can help reduce fever. I am currently in the process of making a guide based on symptoms to help people pick essential oils based on application.


Thank you so much for posting this. I had a reaction to my pure, therapeutic grade Frankincense on my skin and it left me with an itchy rash for over a week. It left me really wondering about the claims the MLM supporters make. I have had great experience in using my oils, but it is foolish to claim they can do no harm. I really appreciate a scientist’s take on all of this.
Essential oils on the market were analyzed using GC-MS and the main ingredients of each essential oil were quantified. Analysis of the essential oil of Lavandula officinalis (lavender oil) showed that each sample had a different ratio of the contents of main ingredients, such as linalool, linalyl acetate, and camphor. In addition, some commercial lavender oils were analyzed by GC-MS for comparison with the Lavandula flagrans (lavandin oil) and the reference standard. As a result of this analysis, although the components of almost all commercial lavender oils were approximately the same as those of the reference standard, there were a few products that contained more than 0.5% of the amount of camphor in lavandin oil. This suggests that some lavender oil samples are mixed with lavandin oil to lower the price. Commercial essential oils of Melaleuca alternifolia (teatree oil) and Mentha piperita (peppermint oil) were also analyzed by GC-MS. Each of the peppermint oil samples had a different ratio in the content of its main ingredient. With respect to teatree oils, the amount of terpinens in each sample differed. These results led to concern about the efficacy of essential oils. For achieve the expected efficacy of essential oils, correct information on their ingredients should be available and quality control using instrumental analysis should be introduced.

I, too, bought my EOs from piping rock and have had no issues (I have extremely sensitive skin due to being a natural red head). I have not had any reactions and am 100% satisfied with the quality of these oils (I do plan on doing the “test” above). But I was unable to justify paying 100’s of dollars on the “essential” EOs and got them all for about $40 from piping rock. I also use coconut oil for a carrier and recommend EVERYONE to do the same! Coconut oil is “miracle oil” in my book!!
Now, I don't sell essential oils, so I don't have a vested interest in where you get your oils from. I do sell products I blend myself from essential oils, like sprays and perfumes, but not the straight oils themselves. I was just taught to never eat them straight, and I want to assure you that your hesitation about ingesting essential oils is rational, sound, and safe.
Think about this for a moment – the aromatherapy industry is not the only user of essential oils. In fact, aromatherapy accounts for a very small percentage. The majority of essential oils produced end up in food flavouring, pharmaceutical, perfumery and personal care and these essential oils are usually modified to meet the standards required for each of these industries.
“The first data set used by DeStefano et.al represents a huge lost opportunity to understand any role between the timing of the first MMR vaccine and autism. The re-analysis presented here elucidates effects that should at least merit further investigation. Specifically, increased risks of earlier vaccination are observed for African-American males and among cases of autism without MR. Both phenomena deserve additional study that could yield important clues regarding the current enormous increase in autism.”
A few more questions...do you use any spices in your cooking? Do you use any lemon peel in bundt cakes or the drizzle for frosting? Do you realize these contain essential oils? Do you remove the essential oils first before using or consuming them? You have cherry picked articles that feed what you were taught in your herbalist teachings. You pick articles that are written by government agencies and supported by big Pharma. Of course Big Pharma doesn't want you to consume the oils, that is a given. You definitely have the right to have an opinion, but what you are stating is not "fact" other than to the person who wrote the article. Those of use who disagree can find articles that completely disagree with what you have reported. So while I do respect your right to write your article and link to the "facts" that support your thoughts, just know that anyone can do the same thing. I'm not doing it in rebuttal because I've done the research for myself and think that others should do the same. Talk to people, for real, who do use them on their skin and who do use them internally. Also, if you are true to your own thoughts, you should recommend that no one use any arthritis aid or any type of muscle ache creams....they have essential oils. GASP!

Examples of these types of essence include:  Cajeput (White Tea Tree), Cedar Leaf, Cinnamon Leaf, Eucalyptus Blue Gum, Eucalyptus Blue Mallee, Eucalyptus (Mint), True Eucalyptus, Laurel Leaf (pictured), Tea Tree, Mandarin Petitgrain,  Lime Petitgrain, Orange Petitgrain, Manuka, Magnolia Leaf, Niaouli, Nerolina, Rosalina, Purple Sage and White Sage.
Finally, if the company’s products are sold through independent sales people, then there will always be some kind of misinformation. Maybe the person who replied to your email was new. People make mistakes! We are human! We need to give people a little more room for human error and not be so quick to judge. Not sure why you are so against this company, or their products., You should really try them, the proof is in the pudding!
Diffusion: This is the healthiest, safest and most effective method of use. The fragrances from essential oils that are detected through your sense of smell actually have profound effects on your body, mood and behavior. When the oils are diffused into the air the healing properties of the essences enter your body through your nose while you appreciate the pleasant smell. The best way to achieve these benefits is by using an essential oil diffuser. We reviewed these diffusers in-depth and found the Smiley Daisy to be the best.
I kept seeing the term "therapeutic grade" or "certified therapeutic grade" in relation to essential oils.  After researching and speaking with numerous experts in the field, it became apparent that this was simply a marketing term that was coined in the 90's, and does not have any real meaning.  Essential oils are inherently therapeutic, and while there are specifications for what constitutes an essential oil, set by the International Organization for Standardization, there is not a set of specifications that would define an essential oil as "certified therapeutic" and no independent bodies that certify essential oils as such. 
Inside the living plant, essential oils serve several purposes, one of which is defense. Acting like the plant’s immune system, the oils help it fight off fungus or bacterial infection, and protect it from insects and animals. Another purpose is reproduction; the pleasing aromas attract pollinating insects like bees and butterflies. We’re not the only animals who like the smell of flowers.
100% Pure. Oils that say “pure” or “100% pure” are allowed to have as little as 51% essential oil by law! Isn’t that amazing? Therefore, “pure” on the label doesn’t really mean pure. And, even if an oil is “pure” in the sense of not being diluted, it may still be adulterated with synthetic chemicals, residual pesticides and with solvents, or it may be of mediocre medicinal quality.
The hesitation you feel the first time a sales representative tells you to drop an essential oil straight from the bottle onto your tongue (or even your skin) is the result of having a healthy respect for the power of nature. It is ok to feel nervous about ingesting essential oils, as the dangers of doing so have been studied, verified, and reported on by the world's most reputable aromatherapy organizations.
I started using oils about 3 months ago. I put a couple of drops of lemon in my water and drink it, use peppermint and citrus oils for aromatherapy energy bombs, have started using them for cleaning, and, I just found a great deoderant recipe that works for me! I’m a fairly large woman (5’10”, 300 pounds) and I sweat a lot, but this recipe works. I use 20 drops each of lemon, frankincense, and lavender in a small roller bottle topped with melted coconut oil. My pits don’t smell at all, even after a fairly hard workout. Some people like fractionated coconut oil, and others like grape seed oil. I prefer melted coconut oil because I like a slightly thicker viscosity. Plus, if it solidifies, just shake the bottle repeatedly and it will get back to normal. For those that want a spray recipe, fill your same 20 drops of each oil into a 3 oz spray bottle and then top it off with witch hazel.
I don’t know much about EOs yet…I’m just learning. However, there are some vitamin B1 patches that are sold as bug repellants. They must be put on 2 hrs before exposure. Just a thought, as you work out your recipe for repellant. A natural vitamin supplement is a gentle way to keep the bugs away. Also, anyone who is bitten will usually become sensitized to bedbug bites about 2 weeks after the first time they get bitten. After that, their skin will start to react to bites just like yours does.
I have yet to come across a YL distributor who is a qualified aromatherapist. Not saying they don’t exist, I just haven’t met one and I check at every trade fair I visit. Possible that the reason you got vague answers from them is because they are preaching the company line that they have been taught without actually knowing/understanding the answer?
We’re having a problem at our apartment that we fear may be bedbugs, and I’m following a recipe to make a topical treatment that is supposed to protect me from being bitten–since I’m one of those unlucky 30% who are sensitive to their bites–while we undergo whatever steps necessary to rid the premises of the pests. It calls for six drops each of lemongrass oil and tea tree oil, and 10 each of lavender and thyme, in a quarter cup of almond oil. I’m supposed to apply it before bed, but I’m wondering how safe it is to apply on, say, the face, since the insects target any exposed skin, and that’s one of the few areas I can’t really cover. Any knowledge on the matter would be appreciated.

The truth is that while indeed the camphor should be low (less than 1%) there is almost always a little bit of camphor in true lavender oil, its basically unavoidable. I have analyzed literally thousands of samples of true lavender oil, including many samples I that have distilled myself and I can tell you, as any other analyst who knows what he is doing will tell you, that if small amounts of camphor are not present then it would be an EXTREMELY unusual exception. Honestly, I cannot even say that I have ever seen a lavender without some small amount of camphor, at least not that I can remember.
This is the first time I've smelled this oil. I recall someone in a bookstore telling me once that this was the smell they used in that store but this oil does not smell like that too me. Perhaps it's not the exact oil as there seems to be 3 variations that I've read so far. But none the less it does not stink or have a heavy soap smell like most oils and I am happy to add it to mu collection. It seems like a very thin oil which will come in handy. It also arrived quickly and packaged well so I do recommend this seller. As to the actual quality of the oil, I have no clue as I'm no expert but happy to have it and look forward to using it more...
Mountain Rose Herbs – (This is the brand that I use for my business and my home) All organic & pesticide-free, wild-crafted (if available), a wonderful company with great smelling essential oils, for really decent prices. This company strives to help the environment in every way and is a zero waste company. They are certified organic by OTCO and they source their essential oils from reputable distillers that they know personally and trust.
For aromatherapy reasons I've always been satisfied with Mountain Rose Herbs's organic essential oils for quality, selection, ethics, and price (mountainroseherbs.com). Others speak highly of Nature's Gift Aromatherapy for the same reasons (www.naturesgift.com). Both have awesome information listed for their oils for traditional and safe uses. Maybe checking out these two could help get you back on track? Good luck!
By the time I first learned about holistic aromatherapy, a number of companies, including those that I otherwise find highly reputable, were also using the terms therapeutic grade and/or aromatherapy grade. I didn't see anything malicious with these terms and the terms seemed to act as a way to quickly convey to consumers that the seller's essential oils were carefully sourced specifically for use by those seeking oils for holistic aromatherapy use.
Other essential oil manufacturers/distributors sell certified organic oils; DoTerra does not. other essential oil manufacturers do not use MLM scams to sell their products; DoTerra does. Other essential oil companies tell people up front that the FDA has not “approved this” info; DoTerra does not. Other companies warn people, as the association for aromatherapists does, that these oils should NEVER be ingested: DoTerra tells people to ingest them (BTW, there IS no “safe dose”; the “safe dose” is “none”). Other companies do not pretend to have scientific evidence when there isn’t any. Other companies don’t make up fake “certifications”. Your ridiculous comparison of tylenol or ibuprofen is just that: those are MADE to be ingested, and essential oils are NEVER meant to be ingested.
Hi Clint, the Aura Cacia oregano oil is not solvent extracted. In fact, no essential oils are extracted with solvents. Only absolutes like Jasmine and Rose are solvent extracted, and absolutes are not essential oils. Oregano oil is safe to ingest, so long as you take care to avoid mucous membrane irritation by only taking it in capsules that also contain a vegetable oil.
Cosmetics and drugs are regulated very differently. Although a few researchers have obtained FDA approval to conduct research on essential oils used therapeutically (as drugs), most essential oils are not considered drugs by official agencies. Thus, they are available to anyone without a prescription and questions of quality are handled as for cosmetics, foods, and flavoring agents.
This is a general summary for people who are using essential oils on a casual basis. 🙂 I didn’t want to muddy the waters here. However, I would gladly revise my statement if the oils were taken internally under the care of a naturopath or other professional. I just don’t think people should, willy nilly, run around taking them internally, due to their potency.
I personally have a number of Aura Cacia's oils that I bought prior to really digging into oils.  I can't say anything except for my personal experience which is that they don't smell as potent as some of the other oils that I have.  I do like the company and I purchase from Frontier Co op regularly, but I'm not choosing to get my oils from them.   That being said, I think that they have a lot of great information about oils and their use.

In the holistic use of essential oils, the focus is on bringing the body back into natural balance and harmony. Disease is seen as merely an outward symptom of a deeper, underlying imbalance in the body, mind and spirit. Holistic medicine sees the body as a self-healing mechanism. The body is capable of healing itself of disease by bringing the whole person back into balance. Therefore, the holistic use of therapeutic essential oils focuses on restoring balance in the body, mind and spirit. Success is gauged equally on the relief of symptoms and the improvement of overall wellness, vitality and happiness.


How do you know which are the best essential oil brands? After all, this is an industry that isn’t regulated by the FDA. Oil quality can vary based on the distillation process. It also matters if the manufacturer dilutes the pure plant oil with bases or additives. But many of the most popular companies do rigorous testing to prove their oils’ purity.
The MOA will conduct various tests on each batch of oil. These tests will include Gas Chromatography having a column length 50 or 60 meters in order to accurately determine the oil constituents according to their certification process. This is not the only method that will be used due to the fact that creative chemical engineers can sneak synthetic ingredients into oils that GC equipment alone cannot pick up. However, using other methods, we will be able to determine whether or not an oil has been adulterated.
Certified Organic: Not officially certified because sourcing happens across a wide variety of countries that don’t all have US matching quality control standards. Same as with the Young Living Oils, they’re not US “certified organic” because of all the rules in the different source countries. Yes – Some of their product line-up is USDA certified organic. Not all of their oils are. 6 out of their 150 essential oils are USDA certified organic. Edens Garden offers both a certified organic line of essential oils, and a conventionally sourced lineup.Both an in-house laboratory and independent labs and consultants perform analyses for product quality.
Parents and grandparents of children need to be aware of the fact that many of these new vaccines will be containing contaminants (such as unfilterable viral particles, bacterial particles, monkey kidney cell fragments, human fetal cells, squalene (in anthrax and some experimental swine flu vaccines), peanut oil (a likely cause of the epidemic of peanut allergies), formaldehyde and even foreign DNA fragments) as well as known neurotoxic additives such as formaldehyde and aluminum (and perhaps even mercury), all of which are known genetic toxins and known causes of  (sometimes subtle and sometimes not-so-subtle – but always preventable) brain damage, vaccine-induced epilepsy, autoimmune disorders, the so-called, but erroneously labeled “shaken baby syndrome” (now increasingly understood to represent a vaccine-induced encephalitis), SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome), dementia, autism spectrum disorders, mitochondrial toxicity, damage to the brain’s microglial and astroglial cells (the brain’s immune system), etc.

Thanks for the informative article on essential oils! I want to know if there are any essential oils that can be applied on my skin (face) just before my skin is exposed to direct sunlight? I know that the skin where citrus oils are applied should not be exposed to direct sunlight for few hours after application. That’s the only question that I am concerned with because I am very interested in concocting a facial oil moisturizer after reading an article of yours that is about making a “3-ingredient facial oil moisturizer”.


Thank you so much for this article. I have been a skeptic of the YL craze and worried when I see people applying the oils to their babies and little ones!! It is so hard to find any information on the internet that hasn't been written by YL themselves!! This is a great article; now I need to figure out how to nicely share it with some of my family/ friends.
Recently, terms such as “therapeutic grade” or “clinical grade” have been used by essential oil suppliers to claim the superiority of their oils over other suppliers’ oils. These terms are not standardized and mean whatever the supplier using them wants them to mean. These suppliers are not necessarily being misleading about their essential oils, yet the terms they are using are not standardized within the industry to meet any specific criteria.
As far back as A.D. 1000, healers used mechanical presses or steam to extract essential oils from fragrant plants. Today, practitioners can rub oil-infused lotions on the skin, where the compounds are absorbed into the bloodstream. Or they can diffuse them into the air where, once inhaled, they bind to smell receptors and stimulate the central nervous system, says Joie Power, PhD, a neuropsychologist and aromatherapist who has taught nurses how to use the oils for decades.
Aromatherapy is an ancient practice of natural healing and plant medicine that has been documented in human civilizations around the world for over 6,000 years. The use of prescribing aromatic plant extracts for massage, for bathing and for mental, emotional and spiritual imbalances has proven benefits through both practical and scientific evidence.
No, it’s not true that “other” essential oils are harmful, and should not be used internally or externally! Has someone told you that there is something impure about certified organic essential oils? Both Young Living and Do Terra buy many of their essential oils from the same industry suppliers that some of the companies listed above buy from. How do I know? Because I have been in the industry since 1974, and suppliers talk. And anyway, there are only so many producers of certain oils.
Used the right way, they can help you feel better with few side effects. For example, you may feel less nauseated from chemotherapy cancer treatment if you breathe in ginger vapors. You may be able to fight certain bacterial or fungal infections, including the dangerous MRSA bacteria, with tea tree oil. In one study, tea tree oil was as effective as a prescription antifungal cream in easing symptoms of a fungal foot infection.
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