Because standards for quality control of essential oils do not currently exist in the United States, it is important to find reputable sources that sell good quality essential oils if you are planning to use them for health-related purposes. Whether you buy essential oils in a store, from an individual, or from the internet, be sure to read any information provided on the label or website, or ask questions about quality.

Contrary to what several essential oil companies recommend, the oils generally should not be swallowed, Power says. The body absorbs more this way, boosting the chance that they will interact with medications or cause an allergic or toxic reaction. Even continued exposure to small amounts (a few drops a day in a water bottle) can lead to fatigue and headaches. Taking in larger amounts of certain oils -- like tea tree oil, wintergreen, and camphor -- can lead to throat swelling, a racing heart, vomiting, and even seizures, says the Tennessee Poison Center, which saw the number of toxic essential oil exposures double from 2011 to 2015.
The current and most deceptive problems are with “organic” oils. Aside from organic certification not regulating quality and not preventing adulteration, is that “organic” clouds the issue of essential oil safety. The naturally occurring toxic constituents of an essential oil are the same in “organic” oils as non-organic oils. Knowledge of what is in the oil is more important for the safe use of essential oils.

This is the first time I've smelled this oil. I recall someone in a bookstore telling me once that this was the smell they used in that store but this oil does not smell like that too me. Perhaps it's not the exact oil as there seems to be 3 variations that I've read so far. But none the less it does not stink or have a heavy soap smell like most oils and I am happy to add it to mu collection. It seems like a very thin oil which will come in handy. It also arrived quickly and packaged well so I do recommend this seller. As to the actual quality of the oil, I have no clue as I'm no expert but happy to have it and look forward to using it more...


When people recommend EO ingestion, I wonder "what happened to herbal teas?" Infused vinegars even? Not only does steeping the whole plant in water give you enough active ingredient to be effective, but it also gives you all the buffers and synergists the plant has to offer that helps the body gently, properly, and completely process the active ingredient. If you're going to advocate ingesting the potent extract of EOs, you might as well advocate the potent extracts of active plant ingredients packaged and sold as pharmaceuticals. Same idea - taking a super concentrated dose of only active ingredient to target an ailment doesn't help the body restore the balance it needs to support its own health - the wisdom of traditional herbalism.
I’m not hear to debate semantics on the exact meanings behind doTERRA’s CPTG rating on their oils. Weather it’s a “trademark” or “certification” in the legal sense does not concern me. What I learned is that the tests are being done and they are extensive. Because of that the company can then give you their promise that they are what they say. There really are extensive test, and they are being done by companies other than doTERRA. I trust the oils because of this and the miraculous results I’ve experienced with them. I DO NOT claim that these are the only pure oils on the market. I believe what I’m reading from other bloggers who stand behind oils that give them amazing results. I think that’s wonderful and I for one hope the market for pure oils will continue to grow. I’ve found that things progress much better when “we all get along”. Working together for the highest, healthiest, outcomes is always going to go a lot further than wasting time on hostilities. The oils on the market that are not pure will eventually weed themselves out among those who use EO’s because they simply do not supply the needed results. For those of you who are new at EO’s, take the time to find ones that work, because the good ones DO work wonders. I prefer to talk about amazing, positive progress in natural health care. I do no care to argue about things that have many issues that have many sides that we may have only partial information about. Natural selection will take care of most of the problems. I will not get caught up in the blogging hostilities that pit this company against that company. I want to spend my time on the positive.
Use the tips within AromaWeb's How to Buy Essential Oils article to guide you on what to look for when considering suppliers. Companies that use the terms "therapeutic grade" and "aromatherapy grade" may simply be trying to quickly convey to you that their oils were carefully chosen and tested for use by those practicing holistic aromatherapy. Some companies still have no idea that these terms are confusing.
Mountain Rose Herbs also holds quite a few certifications and awards pertaining to their product sourcing, including non-GMO project certification, and the 2013 Best Green Business’s To Work For In Oregon. Overall, this company is making quite a few awesome commitments to better, green business practices and if you like this ideology, this is your company to support.
you said eo’s should not be taken internally, yet I have been using doterra’s GX Assist for my 33 year old handicapped daughter who has a lot of trouble with yeast and bacteria and GI problems ( all typical of her handicap which is 22q13 deletion syndrome) I’m only giving her one capsule a day and even though it’s a 10 day course I may continue with this for a while as I am seeing a calmer happier person that meds just haven’t been able to achieve…any advise? I am new to eo’s and want to learn all I can and use them wisely as I suspect I have found something much better for her than all the stuff that has been prescribed by her good doctors over the years.
We would never recommend the internal use of EOs without the advice from a qualified Aromatherapist or similar as our policy. We also never advise using them neat on the skin as the oils are so potent and so easily absorbed. Whilst EOs are indeed a wonderful product provided by nature, they must be treated with respect and sense, a trait often lacking in general public when faced with their own health issue (if one drop was good, then two or three will cure me) attitudes which have been demonstrated many times in our store.
Vibrational energy in molecules refers to the the vibration of bound atoms within a particular molecule. For example, if we look at a very simple molecule like carbon dioxide, we can measure the vibration or frequency of what is referred to the carbonyl stretch (the stretching motion of the double bond between the carbon and the oxygen atoms). The larger the molecule is the more vibrational motions it will have. Molecules in essential oils would have many different bond vibrations going on because even the smaller molecules (monoterpenes) consist of 10 carbon atoms and 16 hydrogen atoms. Thus all essential oil molecules would have many different vibrations going on simultaneously and each different type of vibrational motion in each different bond would have its own characteristic frequency. These vibrational frequencies in molecules are measured using infrared (IR) spectroscopy because energy in the IR range of the electromagnetic spectrum is what is required to cause these vibrations. The magnitude of Infrared radiation is in the 10,000,000,000,000 to 400,000,000,000,000 Hertz range!
To give you an example the perfume industry requires a standardised scent profile for most of the oils that it uses so that the perfume that they manufacture has a reliable scent.  So  the oils supplied to the perfume industry are usually standardised accordingly. Lavender 40/42 is  where two of the main constituents in lavender oil, linalool and linalyl acetate, are added to the oil to make up 40/42% of the oil.
"Why do bulls and horses turn up their nostrils when excited by love?" Darwin pondered deep in one of his unpublished notebooks.  Scientists long ago documented a rich array of animal pheromones, everything from seal, fox and civet, various rodents, boars, beavers, musk deer . . . even the effluence discharged by whales.  Discovering biochemical […]
Hi there, I just started using an e,extranio cigarette, read that if you make your own e liquids, (there’s a few kits out there) you can get read of the only scientifically detected ingredient that might pose a threat to health, this is not nicotine it’s called propylene glycol. I want to make my own liquid using just vegetable glycerin and for the aroma, I thought I could use a tiny amount of essential oils. My doubt is, a Swiss just bottle of lets say thyme, is it a 100% the me extracted oil? Or is there any other ingredient? Do you think for vaping essential oils are ok?
Great article! I like the way everything is explained in detail. I love essential oils and use few kinds for aromatherapy, but the thing I always wanted to do is to include essential oils in my homemade cleaning solutions. In your article I found all the information and advices I needed, so now I already can use essential oils for cleaning too. Thank you for the hints!
The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? It’s important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by companies selling oils and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgments about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.
I just made some really nice cleaner using a spray bottle of 1/2 vinegar, 1/2 water and 6 drops citrus oil and a few peppermint oil (DoTerra). Cleaned the bathroom & under the sink areas (reorganizing day). It smells wonderful in there! And I really appreciate not having the chemicals in the house. Little by little I’m getting there. Wishing you well.

Dr. Robert Pappas says, “There are a lot of companies out there selling essential oils and most of them have no ability (or in many cases no desire) to do the necessary quality control to verify what they are getting from their supplier before they pass it on to their customers.” The GC/MS test determines quality and can show evidence of adulteration, although it is not perfect. Good companies will employ other tests as well like, Organoleptic (sensory tests), or FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy).
Hi. I have been buying my eos from a wholesaler called Bulk Apothecary at a very cheap price. They claim to be very pure and high quality, but the labels on products are pretty vague and I dont have much to compare the quality to, as I have never spent the extra money on more expensive ones. I cant. but I am a firm believer in using them, and am trying to build my collection. Do you know much about this company and their supply of eos? I would appreciate any feedback. Thank you.
I am new to essential oils. I just purchased a diffuser and Callily essential oils sampler pak. I’m following all directions for the diffuser, and adding 3–5 drops of oil, but I really cannot even smell them! I was hoping to use the eucalyptus for my sinuses at night, but sadly I’m getting no benefits or noticing anything healing. Any advice from anyone? It says do not overuse oils in diffuser, but I feel like I need to add more to actually smell them in the air! Thanks for any advice!
Are they an eco-conscious company? One of the reasons I choose the essential oil (and herb) company that I use for my personal and business needs, is because of their sustainable practices. I am very passionate about being eco-friendly and when a business goes to such lengths to be a zero waste company as well as put time and money into other eco-conscious projects, I really have to take notice.

The FDA has not evaluated the statements on this website. The information presented is for educational purposes and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any diseases. Always consult with your physician before using any natural remedy or supplement. Any use of this site constitutes your agreement to our Terms of Use. Honest Essential Oils™ and HonestEssentialOils.com™ are trademarks of Embrace Health, Inc. All content, images, diagrams and logos on this website are copyright protected and may not be copied or used in any way without the express permission of Embrace Health, Inc.
Let’s re-visit one point – if distillation is too long – this can increase the toxicity of the oil. This is because there will be a greater concentration of low-boiling fractions, and sometimes these include relatively toxic substances. Yet how often have I heard that commercial distilleries “shorten” distillation times for profit reasons? That genuine, therapeutic grade essential oils have to be distilled for longer, in order to extract all the important trace constituents?
"Untrained lay people, especially in the multilevel marketing (MLM) business, will say anything to make a sale," Trattner explains. Some folks, especially MLM bloggers—and even some big companies—suggest methods for essential oil use, without informing people of the dangers of using essential oils incorrectly. They’ll say that you can use them anytime, anywhere. In demonstrations, they might dab some on their wrist or talk about how oils can be used in capsules.
The Greeks discovered the Egyptian’s methods and also used essential oils in their practices of therapeutic massage and aromatherapy. The ancient Romans also used essential oils to promote health and personal hygiene amongst their people. Chinese and Indian Ayurvedics also used aromatic herbs, and the Persians began to improve distillation methods for extracting essential oils from aromatic plants and herbs.
DoTerra and Young Living are both Multi Level Marketing companies, making the oils more expensive. All pure essential oils are therapeutic. Young Living tried to copyright the term to set them apart. DoTerra is run by people who left Young Living. These two companies, as well as many others, get their oils from the same suppliers. They make their own blends, but there are some standard blends that are very similar from company to company. Ingesting oils is not necessary because they are so easily absorbed through the skin. I get my oils from a smaller company who uses the same suppliers and I get a lot more for my money!
This is a great resource. I’ use a variety of essential oils. I have a drawer full. Some from Young Living, Simply Earth, Do Terra and Isagenix. There are many good brands but I think people get nervous about trying new brands especially when they’ve heard from well-meaning friends that only the MLM versions are safe. While I do think MLM brands are tested extensively because they are held to very high standards and don’t want to get shut down there are some non-mlm oil brands you can safely buy especially if you plan to use them in your diffuser. I wouldn’t ingest an oil unless the bottle specifically states you can. For ingesting the brands I use right now are Isagenix and Young Living (I’m sure there are others that are safe but these state they are ingestable). I’ve written many posts about how to use oils and I switch out brands depending on my needs and what I have on hand.
Rocky Mountain Oils (RMO) is a company based out of Orem, Utah, operating since 2004 and one of the leading essential oil brands available today. Not only can you buy essential oils at RMO, you’ll also find a comprehensive line-up of skin care, cleaning, wellness, body care, natural supplements, or aromatherapy blending supplies on their online shop.
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I am the "oil queen" and have been around! I love young living but felt as though there had to be good quality oils that were actually affordable. I have tried about 10-15 different oil brands and let me tell you, this is at the very top. I can smell a low quality oil from a mile away. I have researched my brains out and this company has all the right info I needed to find in an oil in order to purchase. I've also bought lavender and I thought well the smell of lavender is just lavender, but this lavender smell is heavenly!!!!!! Keep providing good quality oils at affordable price and I'm a customer for life!

Any essential oil business that cares about selling only pure essential oils will have their oils tested with at least two tests, usually run simultaneously, the gas chromatography and mass spectrometry tests, or GC/MS.  Responsible essential oil vendors will run these tests on every batch of oil they receive from a distiller. Many of these vendors provide batch-specific GC/MS reports on their websites, and some others will provide them on request, sometimes for a nominal fee. Some high quality essential oil vendors do not provide these reports, but those that do are prefered by trained aromatherapists.

I have been pushed by many individuals to do my homework and research everything until I am exhausted on anything deemed "questionable" or non-quantifiable. It can serve to rationalize then, that if essential oils are made from vast volumes of plant materials, that they are in fact extremely potent, and can be dangerous, especially in the hands of those untrained in their usage. (not laying claim that I am just yet, either)I can advocate for a few of the companies you have listed, and I love your article. By the way, for Pete's sake, please do not bash this person. Individuals who ACTUALLY care about our craft, and not about making money, are the ones who suffer. It is people who believe all the marketing schemes and ploys that are causing the use of essential oils as a reliable alternative therapy to come into question. There are folks, like myself who are attempting to apply case studies and scientific logic to the art of Aromatherapy in order to achieve credibility for this craft, and now everywhere you turn, there are big companies and sales reps degrading our precious craft who don't have a clue on what exactly they are even talking about. I myself, after many years, gaining the knowledge I have am just now beginning to get into the advanced field of this craft, and it personally makes me sick to my stomach that people who have no clue recommend unsafe essential oil practices.
Low Price. When it comes to essential oils, you get what you pay for. Growing, harvesting and distilling essential oils of the highest medicinal quality requires extra time and labor, requiring methods that are frankly slower and “less efficient” than modern large commercial producers. It’s the basic law of supply and demand: a small supply of a higher quality product will always cost more than a large supply of a lower quality product.
A few preliminary studies have suggested that peppermint oil may help with irritable bowel syndrome. Although the oil is touted for working as a decongestant and reliving headaches and muscle pain, "there is no clear-cut evidence to support the use of peppermint oil for other health conditions," the NIH says on its website. Capsules of peppermint oil may cause heartburn.

AFNOR (Association Francaise de Normalisation) Their "New Approach" provides directives and standards for members of the European Union states to facilitate intra-community trade. All companies wishing to exchange goods within Europe are therefore obliged to comply with their directives. For essential oils, they provide guidelines and information on various topics including determination of water content, chromatographic profiles, determination of acid value, content of phenols, etc.
The use of essential oils during pregnancy is a controversial topic and one that is yet to be fully understood. The main concern during pregnancy appears to be the risk of essential oil constituents crossing over into the placenta. According to Tisserand and Balacs, crossing the placenta does not necessarily mean that there is a risk of toxicity to the fetus; this will depend on the toxicity and the plasma concentration of the compound.9 It is probable that essential oil metabolites cross the placenta due to the intimate (but not direct) contact between maternal and embryonic or fetal blood.10
Standardized oils are those which have been altered from their naturally balanced state. They can be adulterated with all natural constituents. An example of this would be Lavender. True Lavender is Lavandula angustifolia. Most of the flowers and oil from France are actually a cross between Lavandula angustifolia and Lavandula latifolia and should more properly be referred to as Lavandin (Lavandula x intermedia). Additionally, Lavandin essential oil may be combined with chemical constituents of Lavender or other species, such as linalyl acetate from Mentha citrata, for example, to produce a Lavender 40-42 essential oil, a 40 to 42% standardization of linalyl acetate and linalool content. This oil is most widely presented as a Lavender oil but is not acceptable in the practice of Aromatherapy.
Hi Crunchy Betty, I love your blog and recently bought a whole bunch of carrier oils along with Lavender 40/42 essential oil . I didn’t realise this wasn’t the same as Lavender essential oil and used it (diluted with jojoba oil) on my face – the next morning I had tiny bumps all over my face which were red and very itchy, with slight swelling! Do you know what the difference between these two different oils are, and if the 40/42 is more dangerous to use than the other?  
Whilst the product is very nicely packaged I am very disappointed with the contents. The essential oils are awful, they smell and behave no better than those cheap £1 store ones, I don't believe that they are 100% pure as they smell so awful, cheap and synthetic. I have tried most of the oils in the box and will not be bothering with the rest as they are so bad.
This is a good starter kit, especially if you don't want to spend a fortune on something that may not be your thing. We don't use all 6 of these, so I'm glad I didn't get suckered into buying a more pricey brand. I've purchased expensive essential oils and less expensive ones like these, and these are a good value. Don't get caught up buying multi-level marketing brands like **terra, just buy what works for you and your budget and enjoy!
A friend of ours recently became associated with doTerra and invited my wife and I to a “party” where doTerra sales reps talked about the benefits of EO’s and offered to sell various package deals or individual bottles of doTerra EO’s. They talked about the independent testing that doTerra has done by outside labs that they call CPTG (Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade). I came home and have been researching doTerra and Young Living on the internet (and believe me, I am skeptical of what I read on the internet), but I am very skeptical when companies make unsubstantiated claims about their products. I read doTerra’s testing protocol, but they say nothing about using an independent laboratory to perform the tests. Apparently there are no industry standards that apply to EO. doTerra is a MLM (multilevel marketing) company, kind of what I think of as a pyramid scheme, so their products are more expensive because there are many “middle men”. I don’t have a dog in the fight, other than my dollars, so I have spent several hours trying to educated myself about equally good products for less money. I settled on a company called Organic Infusions, and ordered a few of their oils, and when they arrive, I will compare with our friend’s doTerra oils and see if we can tell any difference. As for Young Living, Gary Young seems to be of very questionable character when you read about various schemes and scams he has allegedly been involved in. You can read about him for yourself by googling Gary Young quackery. I am not recommending the company that I ordered from, as I have not tried their products yet. There is a lot of information out there, Let the buyer beware!
Analysis of the answer: Cleverly pre-scripted rebuttal meant to both reassure you in Young Living's credibility and distract you from the actual issues that concerned you in the first place and prompted you to ask the question, like sales ethics and safety practices. Notice how it never directly discusses if their company really is a reputable company. It also uses keywords, phrases, and ideas that are already familiar to you (like drug companies vs. natural remedies, and money hungry pharmaceutical companies) to overcome your objections. Yes you believe in natural remedies, and yes you believe that "big pharma" is greedy, but what about your concerns regarding this company and this product? Always keep the question you want answered in mind—maybe even write it down.

Bedwetting could be due to a number of reasons. However one, that is not commonly looked at is Breathing issues. my husband is an holistic dentist and part of treatment for early ortho is Breathing…If the child is a mouth breather often he will not be getting the right ratio of oxygen to carbon dioxide causing all sorts of developmental problems..Bedwetting is helped or completely eliminated when addressed as such…. A small piece of micropore tape over the mouth at nights works wonders. Also there are mouth guard type appliances which help (you can get these from some dentists. Hope this helps Judi
The best carrier oils for essential oils Carrier oils are used to dilute essential oils so that they do not irritate the skin of those who use them. There are many different plant-based oils that people can use, including coconut, rosehip, and jojoba oils. In this article, we look at several options and how they can be combined with essential oils. Read now
Unfortunately, there are some people that give companies like YL and similar a bad rap and thus many people feel they need to attack the companies rather than choose to address the individuals or simply provide good evidence based research on which people can make their decisions about essential oil use. We need good sound research out there of what these oils do and how to safely use them. Time spent bashing companies and their supporters is time wasted. It is projected that within the next 30 yrs cancer rates will hit a 50% incident rate. We already know toxins play a role in that, they also are contributing to decreased fertility and increased autoimmune disorders. Essential oils, and other natural health products, have the potential to replace those toxic products we use and counter damage done to our bodies. Let's put our time and energy there and work together to create healthy and well communities.

They're made from parts of certain plants like leaves, herbs, barks, and rinds. Makers use different methods to concentrate them into oils. You may add them to vegetable oils, creams, or bath gels. Or you might smell them, rub them on your skin, or put them in your bath. Some research shows that they can be helpful, if you know how to use them the right way. Always check the label and ask your doctor if you’re not sure if they’re OK for you to use.

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