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Kendra Kirkham wrote a really great article a few years ago for the IFPA Journal “In Essence” about the lack of any formal essential oil “grading” system for aromatherapy and provided clear information about the topic, as well as explain the use of the words “therapeutic grade” as a marketing tool for a certain MLM essential oil company. It’s a shame that many others now elect to coin the bogus term. I understand the thought is to express that their oils may be of higher quality or perhaps used in clinical settings, but use of such terms only adds to consumer confusion. Thanks for bringing this to the attention of the masses.
Great article! I like the way everything is explained in detail. I love essential oils and use few kinds for aromatherapy, but the thing I always wanted to do is to include essential oils in my homemade cleaning solutions. In your article I found all the information and advices I needed, so now I already can use essential oils for cleaning too. Thank you for the hints!
I’ve used YL and DōTERRA and a few other unheard of brands of essential oils and you have got to check out Ameo Essential oils! It’s a brand new company and I’ve been very impressed with the quality of their oils. Another neat thing they do is show results of the testing of every batch of their oils to prove that they are the same high quality, pure, clinical standard oil as used in research and testing. The scientific research is just amazing with these oils.
If a bottle states not for ingestion or internal use, you should put the bottle down and walk away because there are toxic chemicals in it. You CAN and SHOULD be able to ingest your oils and is exactly why you should ONLY use therapeutic grade E.O’s. Things that go on your skin become absorbed into your bloodstream just the same as if you take it internally but it by passes the digestion process which means its even more important to make sure whatever you put on your skin is pesticide free, chemical free and natural.
I personally do not believe EVERYTHING written by companies regarding their products. I research, and sometimes try things out myself, for the truth. I too, have heard and read online the issues regarding YL and doTerra products. As others have mentioned, YL founder has been through the legal system regarding the claims of his products. ( At the same time, our government does not seem to be happy that many are finding alternatives to modern medicine, and would rather everyone was on drugs… so). And that doTerra was started by three former employees of YL.
I’ve also been plagued with terrible leg cramps for about 3 years now. So bad at times i couldn’t go up or down steps without cramping. They started like yours at night while I was trying to sleep. They would wake me from a sound sleep with excruciating pain and I couldn’t even move to get out of bed to try to relieve them. Drs could not give me any help they only prescribed muscle relaxers which I didn’t take.

So when the "Tastefully Simple" rep meets the "Young Living" rep, they assume their training is much the same. They both have a product they are pumped up to believe in, are trained by their supervisors in marketing and sales methods, and are sent out to sell. But while the sales representatives of some MLM companies are just trying to find sales, what the Young Living rep is doing is two-fold both dangerous and manipulative to the customer. Here's why:
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Yes we all agree that there is no independent standard forTherapeutic Grade that is universally recognized. And while you may not like the promotion ofTherapeutic Grade by various companies, it’s not really correct to say that “thereis no such thing as Therapeutic Grade.” Ithink a better response to those promoting such an idea would be to say”while many companies promote their own therapeutic grade standard, oneshould be aware that there is no universally accepted independent body thatcertifies essential oils as therapeutic grade.” That is a fairstatement that is factually correct that nobody can disagree with and will notcause dialog to shut down between those in the direct marketing companies andthose on the more traditional side of aromatherapy.
The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? Its important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by the company themselves and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgements about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.
People who are new to the world of essential oils typically find it easier to use oils medicinally, at least at first. The idea of using a particular essential oil because it supports the body to relieve a particular symptom is fairly straightforward and familiar to most people. The medicinal use of oils is familiar, comfortable and easy to understand because it fits into the same simplistic cause and effect model as does mainstream, Western medicine.
A few more questions...do you use any spices in your cooking? Do you use any lemon peel in bundt cakes or the drizzle for frosting? Do you realize these contain essential oils? Do you remove the essential oils first before using or consuming them? You have cherry picked articles that feed what you were taught in your herbalist teachings. You pick articles that are written by government agencies and supported by big Pharma. Of course Big Pharma doesn't want you to consume the oils, that is a given. You definitely have the right to have an opinion, but what you are stating is not "fact" other than to the person who wrote the article. Those of use who disagree can find articles that completely disagree with what you have reported. So while I do respect your right to write your article and link to the "facts" that support your thoughts, just know that anyone can do the same thing. I'm not doing it in rebuttal because I've done the research for myself and think that others should do the same. Talk to people, for real, who do use them on their skin and who do use them internally. Also, if you are true to your own thoughts, you should recommend that no one use any arthritis aid or any type of muscle ache creams....they have essential oils. GASP!
Mass Spectrometry is used together with Gas Chromatography to further determine the composition of an essential oil. In Mass Spectrometry, the constituents previously separated by GC are ionized and sent through a series of magnetic fields. Using molecular weight and charge, the amount of each constituent can be identified, providing additional insights into the potency of the essential oil.
So if your Essential Oil Sales Representative is telling you all the wonderful health benefits of an oil, you can spot an unverified claim if he or she happens to directly name an ailment or disease. While it is alright to advertise that a substance can help "promote relaxation", it is not a justified claim to say the same substance can help "relieve anxiety", because anxiety is the name of an ailment. So while a sales rep may be trying to sell you products that promote well-being, remember, a sales rep is usually not a medical practitioner, which means they are not equipped to diagnose nor to treat a disease professionally.
The products that ZEVA Essential Oils offers are 100% ISO certified essential oils derived from plant sources, and manufactured to contain active phytochemicals from plants without fillers or chemicals. ZEVA only uses oils certified by the Medicinal Oil Association, and we source our plants from quality suppliers throughout the world. However, because of the differences in organic certification from country to country, and even from one state to another in the U.S., it is not possible to acquire raw materials that are all certified organic. We do check our plant supplies for chemical residues in the form of solvents, herbicides, pesticides, and extenders so we can offer products that are as pure as possible, often exceeding the standards for certified organic products.

Kendra Kirkham wrote a really great article a few years ago for the IFPA Journal “In Essence” about the lack of any formal essential oil “grading” system for aromatherapy and provided clear information about the topic, as well as explain the use of the words “therapeutic grade” as a marketing tool for a certain MLM essential oil company. It’s a shame that many others now elect to coin the bogus term. I understand the thought is to express that their oils may be of higher quality or perhaps used in clinical settings, but use of such terms only adds to consumer confusion. Thanks for bringing this to the attention of the masses.
But microbiome damaging effects aside, is it safe to be ingesting an extract of the essential oils from a plant? Many oils are irritant and known to cause skin sensitivity in some people, however, MLM reps are recommending you ‘add 1-2 drops to a glass of water’ and drink it. It is not fully known how essential oils are metabolised. The essential oils are the most potent substance in the plant and should be treated with far more respect. The only cases of serious harm from essential oil use have been when it has been consumed internally. On poisons.org a clinical toxicologist states that the internal use of both eucalyptus and sage oil has caused seizures.

I believe that the reason some (not necessarily all) E.O.’s are not ok to ingest is that some are extracted by means of chemicals as they are difficult to extract otherwise. You can find this out, or SHOULD be able to find this out via the source of your EO’s. Mountain Rose Herbs lists the extraction method and country of origin on each and every EO they sell. I like MRH as they are a local business here in Oregon and I like to support local business. They have also been wonderful about helping answer questions regarding their products, and are wonderful people as I have met them personally while picking up my orders. (NOT affiliated, just a huge fan!)
When people recommend EO ingestion, I wonder "what happened to herbal teas?" Infused vinegars even? Not only does steeping the whole plant in water give you enough active ingredient to be effective, but it also gives you all the buffers and synergists the plant has to offer that helps the body gently, properly, and completely process the active ingredient. If you're going to advocate ingesting the potent extract of EOs, you might as well advocate the potent extracts of active plant ingredients packaged and sold as pharmaceuticals. Same idea - taking a super concentrated dose of only active ingredient to target an ailment doesn't help the body restore the balance it needs to support its own health - the wisdom of traditional herbalism.
Most citrus peel oils are expressed mechanically or cold-pressed (similar to olive oil extraction).[citation needed] Due to the relatively large quantities of oil in citrus peel and low cost to grow and harvest the raw materials, citrus-fruit oils are cheaper than most other essential oils. Lemon or sweet orange oils are obtained as byproducts of the citrus industry.
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