For example- as an EMT-Routes of Entry are : Ingestion, Injection, Absorption, and Inhalation. If that holds true for recognized EMT practice, it holds true for Oils. These are recognized means of entry. Yes, they are different methods and means, and reactions on the body are different. I am proud of Mindy for letting that customer know that it isn't safe to ingest oils, regardless of what she has heard. So Kudos. Be safe everyone. Any other questions are welcome, and myself and Lee would be glad to assist for any reason. Any contrary reasoning on my explanations are welcomed, I'd be glad to expand on my viewpoints. They are based on sound practice, I would love to talk about it if need be.

Floracopeia is another small, independently-owned company with very ethical roots. Started in 2004 in Grass Valley, CA by David and Sara Crow, Floracopeia is our second-best essential oil company. Like Stillpoint, they have strong personal relationships with their distillers; they will even get their hands dirty as they help harvest the plants for extraction when they visit.
People who are new to the world of essential oils typically find it easier to use oils medicinally, at least at first. The idea of using a particular essential oil because it supports the body to relieve a particular symptom is fairly straightforward and familiar to most people. The medicinal use of oils is familiar, comfortable and easy to understand because it fits into the same simplistic cause and effect model as does mainstream, Western medicine.
Most common essential oils such as lavender, peppermint, tea tree oil, patchouli, and eucalyptus are distilled. Raw plant material, consisting of the flowers, leaves, wood, bark, roots, seeds, or peel, is put into an alembic (distillation apparatus) over water. As the water is heated, the steam passes through the plant material, vaporizing the volatile compounds. The vapors flow through a coil, where they condense back to liquid, which is then collected in the receiving vessel.
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