The volatile constituents of the EOs oils were determined using a Hewlett-Packard 6890 gas chromatograph, equipped with a HP-5975 mass selective detector and HP-5MS capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.25 μm diameter). GC and GC–MS were carried out using split (1:30) injection, with injector temperature set at 220°C, column at 60°C, a heating ramp of 3°C min−1 to a final temperature of 240°C, and the MS and FID detectors set at 250°C. Helium was used as the carrier gas at 1 mL min−1. The GC–MS electron ionization system was set at 70 eV. A sample of the EO was dissolved in ethyl acetate for the analyses. Retention indices (RI) relative to n- alkanes were calculated by linear interpolation. Oils components were identified by comparision of experimental RI with reference data [18], by maching mass spectra with NIST software 05® reference spectra and by injection of authentic standards, when available.

I LOVE this article!! I have a diploma in aromatherapy from a NAHA approved school and working towards a degree in applied science in CAM specializing in aromatherapy; so much of this information is important and those YL and DT people simply don't get it. I'm pleased to see that contraindications, metabolism, and debunking the grades are all addressed. Thank you again for this!!
I’m sensitive to many sources and when my acupuncturist applied peppermint oil to an aching shoulder it sent me right into orbit. Anxiety and blood pressure were out of control for several days. I have always been able to eat peppermint with no problem but the oil while applied to the skin was way too intense. Now just the scent of it sets me off. Be careful.
Recently, there was an article from Vanderbuilt Medical Center stating that the Tennessee Poison Center reported a doubling of children and essential oils exposure in recent years. The article did not state an increase in hospitalizations or side effects. Furthermore, I couldn’t find a source for actual numbers. (The full original article can be found here). Therefore, as soon as I read the press release and did my unsuccessful search, I contacted the reporter.
Essential oils can have multiple benefits - and multiple oils can benefit similar conditions - so it may be easier to start with a pre-made blend, experts said. Many companies - including Elizabeth's Essentials (available locally at Earth Savers) and Young Living essential oils - offer a variety of blends of oils specifically formulated to treat a broad range of conditions ranging from arthritis to sleep to anxiety.
I’m a newbie to essential oils. My daughter-in-law became a consultant for YL oils in the fall. I’m just now researching essential oils and noticed a huge difference in YL oils and others I’ve found online. My question is how do I know when cheaper is just as good, cheaper is the same quality or you get what you pay for, cheap equals cheap quality. Also what is a good carrier for rubbing oils? Thank you for your help.

I have bought dozens of essential oils from Piping Rock. Their prices are simply the best, especially considering the free shipping and “Crazy Deals” they offer and change almost daily. You can get 15 ml of 100% neroli oil for about $15, and it’s lovely! They also have a 15 ml bottle of 100% West Indian sandalwood for $39.95, and it smells GREAT. A 15 ml bottle of 100% pure cistus oil is about $13 or $14. It can’t be beat! Many of the normally cheaper oils (peppermint, orange, cedarwood, tangerine, tea tree, pine etc.) are wonderfully priced too -almost a steal. Their rose, jasmine and tuberose blends did not disappoint scent-wise (they weren’t too weak at all). Their oils come in glass bottles with stoppers and pretty labels. I was scared at first because of how cheap their prices are, but I’m glad I took the chance. On top of the great products, they ship SUPER FAST, package well, and my orders are always complete and correct. So happy with this company. Lastly, by signing up with the http://www.mrrebates.com website (it’s free), and accessing piping rock from there, you will get a %10 discount on your purchase, which you eventually receive as a refund in cash that you can have added to your PayPal account. I’ve earned over $50 in refunds! I’ve seen this % go up and down by a little from time to time, but the average is 10% (which it is as of today, 5/8/14). Maybe wait for a “free shipping day” and try some of the cheaper oils to test the waters first. Even when you have to pay for shipping (for orders under $40), the shipping is a flat $3.95 rate!

Hi. I’m hearing conflicting opinions regarding using lavender oil on my children. I have a 10 yr. old son & 7 yr. old daughter. I love to use the lavender with peppermint & lemon for my son’s allergies. I will also rub some on his temples for a headache. I will also apply to my daughter’s temples for a headache or put a couple drops in her bath. Is this OK? I’ve heard especially in boys that you should not use lavender because it has estrogen in it.


The method employed for biofilm studies was carried out according to described in the antimicrobial assays (MIC) with modifications. The inocula from cultures were prepared at 107 cells/mL for bacteria and 105 cells/mL for C. albicans in BHI or SDB media, respectively, enriched with 2% sucrose. The cultures were incubated at 36°C for 72 h under appropriate atmosphere in order to promote microbial adherence to the bottom of the wells. Subsequently, MIC values were confirmed and to determine MBC/MFC, each adhered biofilm was transferred by swab technique to the surface of blood agar or SDA agar in petri dishes and incubated at 30°C for until five days according to oxygen microorganisms requirements [19, 20]. The MIC/MBC/MFC values were used to determine the MBC:MIC or MFC:MIC ratio, as previously proposed by Hafidh et al. [21] to establish the nature of antimicrobial effect, regard to inhibition or killing of the tested microorganisms.
Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us. I’m researching essential oils for treatment of an ear infection in my little one, and I wondered about “pharmaceutical grade” vs. other types, and your posts here have given me my answer. Your well-written responses to other people above have given me some great insight. I’ll do my due diligence before using anything on my daughter. You’ve done a great job of underscoring the need to know in order to have a safe and desirable outcome. Thank you.
All absolutes are prepared by first extracting the oil from the plant matter using the solvent hexane. This solvent is then evaporated and removed via a stripping distillation process to typically less than one part per million (ppm) remaining, producing what is called a concrete. This concrete is a combination of the plant’s essential oil as well as co-extracted plant waxes. The essential oil is separated from the concrete by ethanol, leaving behind the plant waxes. The ethanol is then actively removed from the remaining material in a second evaporation process, separating the essential oil portion, which is now called an “absolute.” Residual ethanol is typically less than 1 ppm in the absolute material.
Wondering how those great smelling essential oils are made? Turns out, essential oils aren’t “made” at all. They ARE “extracted” from plants, herbs and spices. But just because they are extracted from plants doesn’t mean the way they’re sourced is all the same. In fact, the way they’re extracted from the plant or herb can have a big impact on the quality. Here’s a quick rundown of the two primary ways essential oils are extracted from the plants.
The pinecone has, for centuries, been associated with the pineal gland and spiritual expansion.  The cone can be seen in Vatican City, as well as in ancient art from many cultures, and generally is said to symbolize spiritual enlightenment, divine wisdom and immortality.  These essences are excellent for meditation, amplifying intention or prayer, and for brain balance and health.

The hesitation you feel the first time a sales representative tells you to drop an essential oil straight from the bottle onto your tongue (or even your skin) is the result of having a healthy respect for the power of nature. It is ok to feel nervous about ingesting essential oils, as the dangers of doing so have been studied, verified, and reported on by the world's most reputable aromatherapy organizations.
In the article above this blog there is a link that will take you to 19 essential oils that can be used on babies and children. I looked at it, and the URL is http://www.abundanthealth4u.com Everything I have read about using essential oils on children stresses the importance of proper dilution. Be careful if you decide you want to do this. The word “therapeutic” is tossed around like pizza dough, and it really doesn’t have a scientific meaning when applied to EO’s.
First, their bottles didn’t come with the little plastic dripper caps that cover the mouth of the bottle (aka. orifice reducer), they just had a simple screw cap. Without the orifice reducers you either have to pour the oil out and make a mess or dip an eye dropper into the oil which can potentially contaminate the product if you’re not careful. Plus if oil gets into the little rubber bulb of the eye dropper it can get stuck in there and go bad, further contaminating the oil.
Hannah, all the multi-level-marketing companies say that theirs are the only true and pure essential oils. But, they all buy from the same distillers and wholesale suppliers as every other aromatherapy business. (And notice how they will spin stories that make it sound as if they buy all their oils from unique sources…) Somehow they have to justify their much higher prices, which are needed to support the MLM business model. Their products are similarly priced. Great quality, but you can get the same great quality from many other sources, with less hype, and less mark-up.

Inside the living plant, essential oils serve several purposes, one of which is defense. Acting like the plant’s immune system, the oils help it fight off fungus or bacterial infection, and protect it from insects and animals. Another purpose is reproduction; the pleasing aromas attract pollinating insects like bees and butterflies. We’re not the only animals who like the smell of flowers.

The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? Its important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by the company themselves and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgements about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.
Bergamot Essential Oil has a fresh and delightful citrus aroma with strong citrus notes and a hint of the exotic, and has been made popular by Earl Grey Tea. This refreshing essential oil is suited for aromatherapy and induces a more relaxed and happy feeling, while reducing oiliness of the skin. Widely used in the perfume industry, it is also used in cleansers and toners.
Examples of these types of essence include:  Cajeput (White Tea Tree), Cedar Leaf, Cinnamon Leaf, Eucalyptus Blue Gum, Eucalyptus Blue Mallee, Eucalyptus (Mint), True Eucalyptus, Laurel Leaf (pictured), Tea Tree, Mandarin Petitgrain,  Lime Petitgrain, Orange Petitgrain, Manuka, Magnolia Leaf, Niaouli, Nerolina, Rosalina, Purple Sage and White Sage.

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THE NEW AGE OF ESSENTIAL OILS. Feel the transformation with our standardized, 100% ISO certified, and Medicinal Oil Association approved essential oils. Essential oils are the power of mother nature in the palm of your hand. Only the purest of sources can give you an abundance of natural healing phytochemicals. Only ZEVA brings you the pure medicinal power of Mother Nature, giving you a truly unique experience that you won’t find from any other source. You’ll feel the difference with true medicinal grade essential oils from ZEVA- the new age of essential oils.

The only types of essential oils that should EVER be used are THERAPEUTIC GRADE essential oils. Otherwise, all the benefits of the essential oils are lost to the SYNTHETIC PETROCHEMICALS that are in MOST essential oils (even the ones you get at the health food store… I wont name brands)There are only two name brands that I know of that sell therapeutic grade essential oils.(there could be more) Those brands are Young Living ( Which I highly recommend) and Doterra. More expensive does mean better. Young Living does not sell any of its oils to any other company. There are only a handful of distilleries in the world that’s why most E.O’s are poor imitators. They are not all getting the oils from the same place. They are made in a lab instead.
An essential oil that exhibits this quality will cause burning or skin pigmentation changes, such as tanning, on exposure to sun or similar light (ultraviolet rays). Reactions can range from a mild color change through to deep weeping burns. Do not use or recommend the use of photosensitizing essential oils prior to going into a sun tanning booth or the sun. Recommend that the client stay out of the sun or sun tanning booth for at least twenty-four hours after treatment if photosensitizing essential oils were applied to the skin. Certain drugs, such as tetracycline, increase the photosensitivity of the skin, thus increasing the harmful effects of photosensitizing essential oils under the necessary conditions. Table 3 lists some common essential oils considered to be photosensitizers.
I can understand why the media is often critical of therapies that tout “quick-fix cures” for serious conditions such as cancer. Unfortunately, the media tends to mock or criticize the entire aromatherapy industry for this, not just the companies making outrageous claims. I do believe that aromatherapy organisations need to be more active to ensure that the true holistic benefits of aromatherapy are responsibly communicated to the community. This certainly will be a topic for future discussion.

An absolute is a fragrant liquid that is extracted from the plants using chemical solvents, like alcohol. Though the solvents are removed after the extraction process, there still remains a tiny amount of the chemical in the final product. Absolutes are much thicker and more concentrated than essential oils, and because of this they are often used in skin care products and lotions.


Among the crunchy set, essential oils have a reputation as catch-all solutions to major health problems. Have a fever? Rub peppermint oil on your feet. Suffering from shoddy memory? Put some rosemary oil in a diffuser. It doesn’t help that woo-woo bloggers are running around the internet touting the glory of essential oils in the same breath as some pretty paranoid fantasies ("This is what Big Pharma doesn’t want you to know!!!111").
Maybe if the truth about unsafe uses doesn't discourage sales reps from continuing unethical sales for these companies, the idea that you typically don't make any money, lose credibility amongst your friends and family, and aren't covered by your company for liability issues in case your customers have an adverse reaction to your recommended usage will.
She was very kind to me and said she had been getting a lot of calls on the release due to essential oils’ popularity. She reported that the piece was meant to highlight her conversations with toxicologists on the increasing use of essential oils and exposure to children. The fact is children getting into the oils and swallowing large quantities is bad. However, this was the misuse of essential oils, not a safety issue with the proper dosing. She stated that she never meant for it to be spun and construed that essential oils were unsafe in general.

As you can see, the choice for the right essential oil brand can be very convoluted. There are so many brands on the market, it can be hard to sift through the duds to find the right ones. The key is taking a step back and listening to what the companies are saying. You should also make sure to read the labels, your essential oil label should say 100% pure and not “blend” or “with jojoba/almond” as that means they are already diluted and not just pure essential oil. According to The East-West School For Herbal and Aromatic Studies, some of the qualities that you want to look for in an essential oil supplier are:

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One very public example of this came in September of 2014 when the FDA cited both dōTERRA and Young Living, multi-level marketing essential oil companies. FDA agents found clear evidence that some of Young Living and dōTERRA reps were making claims that their oils could prevent and cure Ebola and many other illnesses! The situation was quickly remedied.

doTERRA wanted to create a purity level that goes above and beyond organic. So they created an internal standard called Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade that is verified by 3rd party testing laboratories. They test their oils 7 different ways to make sure that they are pure and safe for therapeutic use. Even though doTERRA essential oils are not “certified organic“(read why in next paragraph), you can be assured that they are a step above organic.


I found your article via pinterest, very informative, thank you!! I am motivated to get started but overwhelmed not knowing where start. I checked out a few of the websites from some of the brands promoted as the highest quality in the comments section of your article. it seems the prices will start at around 20 dollars per bottle. As someone just starting out, this will be quite the investment if I want to have a variety of oils to use. My question is do you know of any higher quality brands that offer a bundle or sampler package for people like me who are just starting out and will have to purchase maybe five to ten bottles at the same time?
We got rid of a bad bedbug infestation in the house with, well it was either Tea Tree oil or Lavender oil, mixed into spray bottles with 91% alcohol. We weren’t shy about it either, our 1st experience with EOs. We burned through 2oz bottles of each and the bugs vaporized and were gone in two days! They really don’t much like the air that clean and fresh.
A reputable company will test the oil to meet the standard of the plant species. “Ideally, purchase your oil from a company or manufacturer who performs gas chromatography and mass spectrometry testing,” says Dr. Axe. This kind of testing measures the mass within the oil samples and identifies the compounds. Read the company’s website or call the customer service line to find out about its testing before you purchase the essentials oils.

Any essential oil business that cares about selling only pure essential oils will have their oils tested with at least two tests, usually run simultaneously, the gas chromatography and mass spectrometry tests, or GC/MS.  Responsible essential oil vendors will run these tests on every batch of oil they receive from a distiller. Many of these vendors provide batch-specific GC/MS reports on their websites, and some others will provide them on request, sometimes for a nominal fee. Some high quality essential oil vendors do not provide these reports, but those that do are prefered by trained aromatherapists.
I am trying to make up my own mixture of Deep Blue for my cousin who is 70 years old, and who is not on any type of medication as well as for a lady who is 80 after they suffered from a nasty bout of a virus from a mosquito in the caribbean which cause inflammation and joint pains – I have bought all the ingredients, including wintergreen, which you said is poisonous – could you tell me the dosage of the different oils being used namely wintergreen, camphor; peppermint; blue tansy; german chamomile; helichrysum and osmanthus – in the synergistic mix – how many drops of all these oils to make up the mix? I will make up the mix and the post it in a 10 ml bottle to my cousin with specific instructions. I should appreciate your advise.

Thank you for your thoughtful comment. For you to call this article fair and balanced is a huge compliment to the part of me that writes purely from inspiration. No amount of experience or education in this craft give me any idea how I'd instruct another writer to pull that off while calling out a specific company over and over again hahaha! It's been an intense week, week and a half - well, couple months I guess now, and being called back here to where this all began for me to read the comments from you two ladies is really awesome - a welcome break from brainbusting research and timely reporting on EO related matters. I'll also say it's quite a relief. This gets brutal. Thank you both for taking the time - it keeps me going.

Yes you can mix Tea Tree and Rosemary EOS (essential oils). And while using less expensive brands for cleaning might make sense to some,they will not disinfectant the way pure oils will. I would only use a proven pure EO on my body internally and externally. Anything you put on your skin goes into your body in 26 seconds. Young Living owns their own farms, everything is beyond organic, they distill in their own distilleries which are open along with the farms world wide for any member to visit and learn from. The oils are 3rd party tested. By law an EO manufacturer can put 100% pure on their bottles and only have 5% pure EO, they don’t have to say what the other 95% is. My recommendation… Do your homework!
Your friendly Young Living representative, a reputable and trusting mild-mannered friend you've probably known all your life, repeats the lessons she has learned from her Multi-Level Marketing superiors. All she knows is what she's been taught - it sounds credible, it's been (deceptively) linked to scientific research, and it's very convincing. What's more, any questions she has about the product will be answered the same way she is eventually taught to rebut concerns from her customers. Her rebuttal will be full of empty wording that sounds official, using phrases like "Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade", "generally regarded as safe" and "approved by the FDA" as she's taught to turn your negatives into her positives in order to get that sale!
It is not the only credible-looking article of its kind, just a good example of the types of articles, studies, and books you will find while trying to do your own independent research. As the title of my article here points out, all of the articles I have found claiming safe ingestion of straight essential oils have turned out to be written by Young Living representatives, and they are not in short supply.
Thank you so much for this article. I have been a skeptic of the YL craze and worried when I see people applying the oils to their babies and little ones!! It is so hard to find any information on the internet that hasn't been written by YL themselves!! This is a great article; now I need to figure out how to nicely share it with some of my family/ friends.
Twenty medicinal and aromatic species choose for this study were belonging to “Collection of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants” - CPMA of the Research Center for Chemistry, Biology and Agriculture (CPQBA), University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP, Brazil (http://www.cpqba.unicamp.br/), with the vouchers numbers indicated in Table 1. Samples were collected in spring/summer from November 2009 to January 2011, in the morning after dew point. The exsiccates from plant material used in this study are deposited in the herbarium of the Institute of Biology at UNICAMP - UEC and were identified by Dr. Washington Marcondes Ferreira Neto (curator). The species were deposited in the.
I especially wanted to research what the sales rep claimed about the FDA approval. She absolutely said that they had some sort of FDA approval for internal use – theraputic grade. I have it right here in my notes. I was skeptical… I also raised my hand and asked about allergies and reactions and internal use. Since I am a doula and have been told by aromatherapists that unless I become certified I really shouldn’t be using aromatherapy I was interested in their view on this. The sales rep said she had no idea about possible reactions and since their products were pure then there shouldn’t be any reactions and they can absolutely be used internally where indicated. In fact during the presentation she encouraged us all to try several things internally and wiped almost every other oil on our skin.
The quality of essential oils can vary widely. As a consumer (and even as an aromatherapist), it is difficult to assess quality. Essential oils come from all over the world, and suppliers or companies usually obtain oils from farmers or wholesalers whose practices and integrity they have come to trust over time. The end consumer would not be aware of (or have the capability to assess) those relationships and practices. For those interested in learning more about regulating bodies and certifying organizations, some information and links are provided below.
Young Living frequently cites GC/MS testing to verify both the purity of their essential oils and to verify their claims of the existence of impure oils on the market. Their reps educate consumers about inferior quality oils by noting the price of the oil, and conjuring up the frightening idea that some oils could be intentionally adulterated with toxic additives and then mislabeled as pure. These two reasons are then used to reassure nervous customers that the straight consumption of essential oil is safe, but only if they are Young Living's high priced, "therapeutic grade" oils.
Thank you for all you are doing to educate all of us about essential oils. My question is this: I noticed earlier in this thread that one of your recommended sources of essential oils was a company called Appalachian Valley in Maryland. But I noticed later on that when you listed your recommended suppliers, Appalachian Valley is not on the list. Did you leave them off of your newer list for any particular reason? I would like to get some oils from them, but when I saw that your new list didn’t include them, I wondered whether I should rethink my potential purchase. So, does Appalachan Valley still pass muster, or no?
I was recently introduced to EO's through a friend who had just signed up to be a rep for Young Living. I went to one of her parties and I am such a skeptic by nature that I delved into searching the internet. I've decided that I will definitely be staying away from the MLM companies. Native American Nutritionals (on your list above of ethical, trustworthy companies) was highly recommended on several blogs so I decided to give them a shot. After ordering from them, I learned they had merged with Rocky Mountain Oils (not on your list). Does that mean NAN is no longer trustworthy or does that mean Rocky Mountain is now considered trustworthy? Oy, now I'm back to square one of research. Any recommendations? I am currently using NAN's Immune Strength diluted in coconut oil on my children's feet (6 years old and 4 years old). I also have peppermint and lavender and only use them diluted on myself and the kids. Do you have any advice to help narrow down the options for which company to pick? Or am I okay sticking with NAN? And don't worry, we will never ingest any oils!
I love do terra oils. I have been usining the oils and suppliments internally, neat, and with carriers for over 5 years now. I haven’t died yet, nor my kids or extended family. Network marketing is a great way to market essential oils, because you want to talk to people face to face about the oils and how to use them. There are several companies that I’m sure offer quality essential oils, for me , Doterra has been sufficient for my needs, and I trust the company.
The quality of essential oils can vary widely. As a consumer (and even as an aromatherapist), it is difficult to assess quality. Essential oils come from all over the world, and suppliers or companies usually obtain oils from farmers or wholesalers whose practices and integrity they have come to trust over time. The end consumer would not be aware of (or have the capability to assess) those relationships and practices. For those interested in learning more about regulating bodies and certifying organizations, some information and links are provided below.
Essential oils can have complex biochemical interactions in the human body, she says—and different essential oils can create different reactions in our enzymes and hormones. One of the active ingredients in tea tree oil, for example, is Terpinen-4-ol, which was shown in studies to kill ectoparasites found on human skin and kill infectious amoebas that cause eye infections.
“No vaccine manufacturer shall be liable…for damages arising from a vaccine-related injury or death.” – President Ronald Wilson Reagan, as he signed The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA) of 1986, absolving drug companies from all medico-legal liability when children die, become chronically ill with vaccine-induced autoimmune disorders or are otherwise disabled from vaccine injuries. (That law has led directly to an expected reckless, liability-free development of scores of new, over-priced, potential block-buster vaccines, now numbering over 250. The question that must be asked of Big Medicine’s practitioners: How will the CDC, the AMA, the AAFP and the American Academy of Pediatrics fit any more potentially neurotoxic vaccines into the current well-baby over-vaccination schedule?)
This actually dates from May 2010, but judging from the related comments, has only recently been noticed. The statement that “Clary sage is the essential oil that is most widely used to treat vision problems” is not true, since there are no essential oils commonly used to treat vision problems. The only evidence for any essential oil treating any eye problem relates to tea tree oil and eyelash mites (see below). The reference to clary sage probably derives from 17th century European herbalists, but this refers to using clary sage seeds, or mucilage made from them, and not to clary sage essential oil: “The seed put into the eyes clears them from motes and such like things gotten within the lids to offend them, and it also clears them from any white and red spots which may be on them” (Culpeper 1652). Another common name for clary sage (Salvia sclarea) was “clear eye” because of this common use of the seeds, which probably pre-dated Culpeper by many years. “Clary” may derive from “clear-eye.”

It appears your confusion likely arises from the conflicts in logic created by citing statements from my article that aren't found in it. I DO however state in this piece that I don't fault the reps, and I have no issue examining the reprocussions a for-profit business inflicts upon individuals, ESPECIALLY those companies causing harm and injury to actual people who've agreed to pay them for holistic health and wellness. Just a simple matter of business ethics, nothing personal, because businesses are not people.
I hope this helps to clarify doTERRA’s official position on the matter. In summary, d?TERRA has not and does not claim any certification, registration or approval of its essential oils by the FDA, AFNOR, ISO, or any other regulatory body. We do believe that the CTPG standard supports d?TERRA’s effort to bring to market only the most pure essential oils.
On your comment on liability - I think that is one thing they can get around. To my understanding, each person in MLM runs their own business. Their up-line connection is a separate business entity and isn't liable for anything illegal a different company does. You have to prove that the illegitimate practice is pushed from the parent. This is often associated with written and verbal training materials and information that differ in content.
Beyond their story, though, I really like the MLM way of getting the word out. I firmly believe that every household should know about and have essential oils on hand and word of mouth marketing and education just works…most of the time. I am also aware that I can attend an educational event with a friend and come away with different “information” than he or she did. I’m really fortunate to live in New Mexico where we have a large but tight-knit doTERRA community. If we hear someone making statements that are obviously misinterpretations or misrepresentations of the company and/or the product, someone will reel them in. Likewise, they will be reeled in if they’re heard to be prescribing what someone should use.
The method employed for biofilm studies was carried out according to described in the antimicrobial assays (MIC) with modifications. The inocula from cultures were prepared at 107 cells/mL for bacteria and 105 cells/mL for C. albicans in BHI or SDB media, respectively, enriched with 2% sucrose. The cultures were incubated at 36°C for 72 h under appropriate atmosphere in order to promote microbial adherence to the bottom of the wells. Subsequently, MIC values were confirmed and to determine MBC/MFC, each adhered biofilm was transferred by swab technique to the surface of blood agar or SDA agar in petri dishes and incubated at 30°C for until five days according to oxygen microorganisms requirements [19, 20]. The MIC/MBC/MFC values were used to determine the MBC:MIC or MFC:MIC ratio, as previously proposed by Hafidh et al. [21] to establish the nature of antimicrobial effect, regard to inhibition or killing of the tested microorganisms.
Rebecca – Wintergreen oil is 96-99% methyl salicylate, and neither the oil nor the compound is listed under GRAS (generally recognized as safe) or FA (permitted food additive). However, it is on a list of indirect food additives (substances that are permitted to be present in trace amounts only, and not added intentionally), as a constituent of adhesives used in food packaging.
This course will show exactly how to build a successful essential oil business — one that could potentially generate $1,000, $5,000, $10,000 per month in side income.The strategies you’ll learn helped me grow my business to 1.8+ million Facebook fans, 12 million monthly website readers, 1.7 million email subscribers and millions of dollars in essential oil sales.
Exposure to essential oils may cause a contact dermatitis.[20][21][22] Essential oils can be aggressive toward rubbers and plastics, so care must be taken in choosing the correct handling equipment. Glass syringes are often used, but have coarse volumetric graduations. Chemistry syringes are ideal, as they resist essential oils, are long enough to enter deep vessels, and have fine graduations, facilitating quality control. Unlike traditional pipettes, which have difficulty handling viscous fluids, the chemistry syringe, also known as a positive displacement pipette, has a seal and piston arrangement which slides inside the pipette, wiping the essential oil off the pipette wall.
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