One of the keys to producing the highest quality essential oils is to have the highest quality growing conditions for the plants prior to extraction. For that reason, ZEVA focuses on sourcing our plants from indigenous regions where the growing conditions are ideal for the plants, rather than trying to force them to grow in a non-native, less hospitable environment. Our team works with suppliers from around the world to find the highest quality ingredients to go into every essential oil we produce.
A few preliminary studies have suggested that peppermint oil may help with irritable bowel syndrome. Although the oil is touted for working as a decongestant and reliving headaches and muscle pain, "there is no clear-cut evidence to support the use of peppermint oil for other health conditions," the NIH says on its website. Capsules of peppermint oil may cause heartburn.

To answer your questions I have to answer #2 first. Jena is right – there are a limited number of distilleries, D. Gary Young owns 1/3 of them. The products distilled to make EOs are like the contents of tea – they can be distilled multiple times but each time you do so the product you get is progressively weaker. Companies like doTERRA and Young Living only take the 1st distillation which is the strongest and most pure. They label their product therapeutic grade and 100% pure because they have run it through a mass spectrometer and have calculated the constituents in each bottle. Young Living actually refuses to sell any bottle of EO that does not meet their requirements for purity. Less expensive companies use the 2nd, 3rd, and even 5th and 6th distillation. They also dilute their products before marketing them. So it is important to know about the company you are buying from and what distillation they use. Not all distillations are equal.
Storage: Once they receive their shipments directly from the distiller (no middlemen) they immediately pour them into amber-colored bottles, then they remove the oxygen by filling the remaining space in the bottles with nitrogen before placing them in cold storage; this drastically reduces oxidation and greatly enhances the shelf-life and vibrancy of the oils. And if that weren’t special enough, Joy and Cynthia literally hand-pour every bottle to order. What this means is, the essential oil stays in cold storage, with nitrogen, until you place your order, only then will the oil be poured custom into the tiny 15mL amber bottle, just for you! No one else takes such pride and care.
I have been using, ingesting and inhaling these oils for 10 years, and have had arthritis pain minimized, cholesterol levels lowered, my husband’s BP lowered in 20 minutes, been able to sleep without taking a drug, had excruciating reflux diminished and often eliminated in minutes. I don’t know what they can do for you…each person is different, you have to “play” with them until you find what works for your body chemistry. God created the plants for healing, not pharmaceutical companies. Sometimes there may be a need for a pharmaceutical for a limited time, but mostly…I’LL STICK WITH MY OILS and herbs thank you!
very interesting. I am just a stay at home mama trying to do the best for my family. We use EO’s everyday, I clean with them, I diffuse them and I ingest them. If my throat is sore, I have a mixture of straight oils that I take, I’m not endorsing a brand, but I have several mixtures that have cured my asthma and my sons, we both put them directly in our chest. I’ve been to my natural path and he doesn’t endorse this particular brand but he tested the oils in is and to,d us which ones were beneficial to each of us. If you have access to a certified herbalist who can do energy testing it is very helpful to find out what works for you- if you can get passed the cost 😉
I just want to add a note here on behalf of those companies like NOW and Aura Cacia and all the others from the health food store I’ve tried. They may have all good intentions. They may or may not be testing their oils, anyone can give a test. The mass spectrometry test will pass with a very high amounts of filler oils and chemicals from extraction in it. These issues may not necessarily be from the owners of companies that get oils out there, it may be from the farmers selling the oils and trying to get an extra buck or from somewhere else in the line of business people it goes through before it gets to our shelves. Our world is very focused on money so who knows where the fault really falls. If you’re wondering what brand you should use, I would recommend the three above… doTerra, TRUessence, Young Living… however, I think its better for people to decide for themselves, so maybe do your own smell test. I’ve also been told that if an oil says “not for internal consumption” then there’s a pretty high chance that it is not as pure as it should be to be safe (at least if its is on the FDA’s GRAS list). I know this is long, but hey you asked right? And anyhow, education brings true freedom.
Based on the MIC results 10 μL of the cells suspension from the wells showing no visible microbial growth and from three wells above them were subcultured in Petri dishes containing Sabouraud Dextrose Agar medium (SDA- Merck®) for yeasts and Tryptic Soy Agar (TSA-Difco®) or Blood Agar media for bacteria. The plates were incubated at 36°C until five days in aerobic, microaerophilic or anaerobic conditions. The MBC/MFC was defined as the lowest sample concentration showing no cell growth on the inoculated agar surface. The tests were performed in three independent experiments, each one in triplicate [19, 20]. The EOs and fractions antimicrobial activity was classified in strong, moderate or weak according to Duarte et al. [17].
This actually dates from May 2010, but judging from the related comments, has only recently been noticed. The statement that “Clary sage is the essential oil that is most widely used to treat vision problems” is not true, since there are no essential oils commonly used to treat vision problems. The only evidence for any essential oil treating any eye problem relates to tea tree oil and eyelash mites (see below). The reference to clary sage probably derives from 17th century European herbalists, but this refers to using clary sage seeds, or mucilage made from them, and not to clary sage essential oil: “The seed put into the eyes clears them from motes and such like things gotten within the lids to offend them, and it also clears them from any white and red spots which may be on them” (Culpeper 1652). Another common name for clary sage (Salvia sclarea) was “clear eye” because of this common use of the seeds, which probably pre-dated Culpeper by many years. “Clary” may derive from “clear-eye.”

Dr. Pappas is the President/Technical Director at Essential Oil University. Founded in 1999 by Dr. Robert S. Pappas, EOU is an educational/informational institution dedicated to essential oil production, chemistry and uses and has the largest online database for essential oil chemistry in the world. Dr. Pappas is also an adjunct Professor at Indiana University. Dr. Pappas work has made him a much-sought-after consultant for companies and individuals all over the world because the information he provides helps with quality assurance and with learning how an essential oil might be useful. Dr. Pappas created the Facebook page Essential Oil University which is dedicated spreading accurate information concerning essential oils and dispelling the myths that have been hyped over the years.


You won’t be required to use any oils as part of the program. But if you’re planning to get certified in essential oils, I believe that actually owning and using oils will enhance your experience and shorten the learning curve. Plus, we’ll show you what to look for in high-quality essential oils — so you know which oils to use and recommend to your clients. But you will not specifically buy any oils as you go through the training.
If you are using Firefox or Google Chrome as a browser there is an app/add-on called “adblocker plus”. Download and install it. When you see floating icons like that and they bother you, right-click over them and scroll down to “block element” or “use adblock” and click OK/Submit/Add. This will remove the floating script/image and allow for better viewing.

The truth is that while indeed the camphor should be low (less than 1%) there is almost always a little bit of camphor in true lavender oil, its basically unavoidable. I have analyzed literally thousands of samples of true lavender oil, including many samples I that have distilled myself and I can tell you, as any other analyst who knows what he is doing will tell you, that if small amounts of camphor are not present then it would be an EXTREMELY unusual exception. Honestly, I cannot even say that I have ever seen a lavender without some small amount of camphor, at least not that I can remember.


I hate to be harsh here but what an utter load of pure NONSENSE!!! First let me say that I live in Indiana, one of the largest mint producing states in the country. I have visited mint distilleries and farms on several occasions (you can see some photos of one of my visits in the album entitled “Mint Farm in Northern Indiana”). NOBODY STEAM DISTILLS THE SAME MINT LEAVES MORE THAN ONE TIME!! The plant is distilled for basically 2 hours and its done, no more oil is coming out so they shut the still down. It’s absolutely ridiculous to think that the distiller, after watching his oil come over, seeing that his oil level is not growing, shuts the still down and then later thinks to himself “gee, I bet if I fire this still back up (wasting thousands in fuel and labor) we can get some more oil out of that spent mint leaf we distilled yesterday.” Where do people come up with this stuff!!?? Now the MINT OIL can, and often is (thank God), taken for some further redistilling and/or fractional vacuum redistilling that can take place to further improve the quality of the oil by removing nauseating components of the whole oil (just tiny amounts of very bad smelling components get removed in this process). But NOBODY distills the mint biomass a second or third time. This is generally true, not just for mint, but for essential oil distillations in general. When I tried to explain it to the person posting this rubbish she basically did not believe me because her “research” of talking to retailers of essential oils apparently was of higher credibility. If people would just use some common sense they could look at this kind of misinformation and come to the conclusion that none of it makes sense. From an energy standpoint, why would anyone plan to shut down their distilling process just to start it up again later? The amount of energy required to get massive amounts of water boiling and enough steam generating to liberate the oil from large vats of biomass is quite astonishing and costly. Why not just keep distilling and just start collecting the oil produced at the tail end of the distillation in a separate container, if you want to collect what you think might be a different quality at the end of the run than at the beginning (by the way this is done with Ylang Ylang oil which is why there are the different grades of extra, I, II, III and complete). But aside from ylang ylang most all essential oil distillations are collected in one combined lot. And the only time I have ever seen a distiller shut down his process and restart it later was because of mechanical problems, running out of fuel, or just getting too physically tired to continue (in the case of sandalwood for example the distillation can go on for more than 24 hours and oil is still in the wood). I hope that this post will finally do some damage to this myth that has been circulated for decades now and we can finally put it to bed. Please share this post with as many people as you can and firmly admonish anyone who continues to state that “my oils only come from the FIRST distillation.” Yeah right buddy, just like everybody else’s oil. LOL

Hi there, I just started using an e,extranio cigarette, read that if you make your own e liquids, (there’s a few kits out there) you can get read of the only scientifically detected ingredient that might pose a threat to health, this is not nicotine it’s called propylene glycol. I want to make my own liquid using just vegetable glycerin and for the aroma, I thought I could use a tiny amount of essential oils. My doubt is, a Swiss just bottle of lets say thyme, is it a 100% the me extracted oil? Or is there any other ingredient? Do you think for vaping essential oils are ok?
If you do your research you will find that the ISO spec for lavender lists the acceptable camphor up to 1.5% , depending on origin, and the British Pharmacopoeia lists camphor at max 1.2%. My standard at EOU is that camphor, 1,8-cineole and borneol should all be about 1% or less in true lavender essential oil. My standard is based on samples taken from all over the world as well as from many distillations that I have personally done on many different varieties of Lavandula.

In aromatherapy and perfumery, Frankincense Essential Oil is considered an exclusive and highly desirable ingredient. Since ancient times, it has been used as incense and perfume, and as an exquisite cosmetic ingredient. It is considered the most valued oil for skincare products. This oil retains the sweet, warm and woody notes of the resin from which it is extracted.
@millicent: let's make an amino acid comparison: amino acids are good and healthful, right? when attached to their proteins, yes, amino acids are good and healthful. but when separated from their proteins and ingested, they are absorbed too quickly by the body and become excitotoxins. for you to compare consuming lemon peel with consuming lemon essential oil only reveals your lack of knowledge and understanding on this topic.

Are you using it for aromatherapy? If so you should try chamomile or neroli EOs. Another thing that’s great for anxiety is taking orange blossom water (sold in glass bottles either in the import section of your grocery store, or at a store that sells middle eastern cooking supplies) and put it into a spray bottle with a few drops of lavender–they smell amazing together. Shake it up well and use it as a room spray. It can also be used on furniture and fresh laundry, and spraying down your pillows helps great for insomnia caused by anxiety. Hope that helps!
The recommended usage of many essential oils is hotly contested throughout the aromatherapy profession. The majority of oils you find in the supermarket are absolutely safe (though you should research them before using them); however, once you start digging into the world of essential oils, you’ll find that professionals – even within the same organization – debate extensively over the use of certain oils. If you’re ever unsure about an oil or its use, do the research you can, and if you still cannot make up your mind as to its safety – avoid it. But, by all means, do NOT be afraid of essential oils. Just use them with care and respect, and all will be fine.
If you're feeling confused, stick with the basics. "Lavender oil is a great EO for beginners. You can inhale it before sleeping, pour a few drops into a diffuser, or rub it onto your pressure points (neck, wrists, and other places where your pulse is most prominent). Plenty of studies have been done on lavender oil to demonstrate its efficacy," Trattner says.
“In a base of…”. Unfortunately, many companies will use an extender oil like almond or safflower oil as a base to dilute the essential oil in order to cut costs. This creates a slower acting oil, and one that is much less effective for many uses. Extender oils can also become rancid quickly, reducing how long the oil will last. Even if a high quality base oil is used, diluting the original essential oil limits how you can use the oil.
I submitted an article, which you published as a Guest Editorial on page 22 of your March 2010 issue, entitled Essential Oils: Premium Quality Yields Premium Results. On page 10, your Contents Page, this was listed as: Guest Editorial: Read about therapeutic grade essential oils in “Powerful Tools in A Small Bottle”, by Dawn-Mari Yurkovic, at www.massagemag.com/powerfultools. Don’t you agree this is a little weird? One person writes a two-page article, and a completely different person/article is listed on the Contents page of the magazine?

Thanks for this article! I’m glad that there are balancing voices out there to educate people about what is right and what is wrong. I’ve heard of too many BS from people who don’t do their research before spreading and sharing any advises, and most of them don’t care about the fact that they don’t even have the most basic training or education on aromatherapy! That’s simply irresponsible to me.
Is the information in these Young Living articles trustworthy, sound, and rational as it relates to the proper use of essential oils? Why are sales reps giving medical advice? And how do they convince us that eating the pure, undiluted essential oil of a plant—as warned against by clinical aromatherapists and aromatherapy organizations—is perfectly safe?
You sound so anti-DoTerra that you lose all credibility. You sound like you’ve invested so much in time and effort in bashing DoTerra, that you’d keep bashing them no matter what research was done on their oils. I don’t really care what your background is, you’ve lost all credibility by the way that you’ve vehemently bashed the DoTerra company completely. Do you know what Medical Doctor’s do as research? They try out things, and look at the results. My results in using DoTerra oils compared with other oils is that they have worked better. I haven’t used all the different brands, but out of the ones I’ve used, DoTerra have given me the best results. It’s not unsafe to ingest certain essential oils, at all. It’s like saying that it’s unsafe to ingest tylenol, or ibuprofen. It’s not unsafe when done in the proper quantities. You’re ignorant by denouncing a companies’ product just because of the way that they’ve chosen to market it. By the way, DoTerra has grown into a company with more than 100 million dollars in sales per year in just 6 years, marketing the way that they do. I think they’ve made wise business decisions up to this point by marketing the way that they have. I don’t sell DoTerra, because I’m not interested in doing sales, at all. But, their oils work really well, and I personally have seen great benefits from using them.
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A few more questions...do you use any spices in your cooking? Do you use any lemon peel in bundt cakes or the drizzle for frosting? Do you realize these contain essential oils? Do you remove the essential oils first before using or consuming them? You have cherry picked articles that feed what you were taught in your herbalist teachings. You pick articles that are written by government agencies and supported by big Pharma. Of course Big Pharma doesn't want you to consume the oils, that is a given. You definitely have the right to have an opinion, but what you are stating is not "fact" other than to the person who wrote the article. Those of use who disagree can find articles that completely disagree with what you have reported. So while I do respect your right to write your article and link to the "facts" that support your thoughts, just know that anyone can do the same thing. I'm not doing it in rebuttal because I've done the research for myself and think that others should do the same. Talk to people, for real, who do use them on their skin and who do use them internally. Also, if you are true to your own thoughts, you should recommend that no one use any arthritis aid or any type of muscle ache creams....they have essential oils. GASP!
Thank you so much for posting this. I had a reaction to my pure, therapeutic grade Frankincense on my skin and it left me with an itchy rash for over a week. It left me really wondering about the claims the MLM supporters make. I have had great experience in using my oils, but it is foolish to claim they can do no harm. I really appreciate a scientist’s take on all of this.
A few can be used on cats, but in general I’d go with the advice of Doing Research On Everything First. If my boys don’t like the smell of something (like my fingers after using an oil and before I can get to washing up…funny story there from when my boys were young) there is no way I’ll us it on them. But there’s also the fact that their systems do react differently.
Organic certification only applies to the growing method for the plants used to make the essential oil. It does not carry any guarantee of purity or potency beyond that. On the other hand, many companies (including doTERRA) very carefully source their oils and even though they may not come from certified organic operations (which is expensive and cost-prohibitive) the oils produced are very pure and potent. Check out LearnEssentialOils.com for a free guide to finding high-quality essential oils. Good luck!
Janice – no, it’s not at all junk science, and this is what ISO standards are all about – the maximum and minimum ranges of key constituents. This does of course vary with different chemotypes, as well as different species, and it can also vary with geographical origin. So there is an ISO standard for peppermint oil from the USA, and a different one for the rest of the world. (this is not elitism – ISO standards are not US-based.)

Essential oils can have complex biochemical interactions in the human body, she says—and different essential oils can create different reactions in our enzymes and hormones. One of the active ingredients in tea tree oil, for example, is Terpinen-4-ol, which was shown in studies to kill ectoparasites found on human skin and kill infectious amoebas that cause eye infections.


DoTerra and Young Living are both Multi Level Marketing companies, making the oils more expensive. All pure essential oils are therapeutic. Young Living tried to copyright the term to set them apart. DoTerra is run by people who left Young Living. These two companies, as well as many others, get their oils from the same suppliers. They make their own blends, but there are some standard blends that are very similar from company to company. Ingesting oils is not necessary because they are so easily absorbed through the skin. I get my oils from a smaller company who uses the same suppliers and I get a lot more for my money!
I used the NOW brand along with many others that I picked up easily at my local health food store for years. I would use what you bought. I say this with caution though, because when using oil that has not undergone testing to prove its purity and that has been held to a high standard, you risk synthetic chemicals, fillers, and less potency. With so many companies out there using unethical practices to extend their oils it can be scary and even toxic to the user. This is why I have now switched to a new provider. I researched about 50 companies thoroughly and only found 3 that I would actually feel fully safe using for both me and my kids. I chose the one I felt like was the best for me and I have been so excited to see how much quicker and more effectively they do their work to help my families bodies in all kinds of situations. I still have some of my old oils like the NOW brand and I will use them until they are gone, but I have switched to not using them directly on my body, and instead just use them for when I am making homemade cleaning products. Examples would be my floor cleaner, my laundry, etc. Never use any NOW oils internally (it says so on the packaging) but if you’re not worried about extra toxins then using a small amount in a diffuser or on trouble areas is something I did with some positive results (though those results were not as pronounced or quick as the results I see now).
Here is a list from one hospital of what they use the oils for:We regularly treat gout, neuropathy, carpel tunnel, sinusitis, headaches, abdominal pain, kidney stone pain, neuralgia, tennis elbow, arthritis, back pain, leg cramps, post-op hip and knee pain and whatever else comes our way. Each patient’s need, including which Young Living Essential Oils were used, is documented in our electronic charting so we can track their outcomes. We always have a good stock of Young Living lavender, peppermint, Peace and Calming, lemongrass, Thieves and plenty of single oils to make blends for gout.
~ I still worry a little about the internal and undiluted use of the oils but due to their purity I am less worried and have not seen or heard about any adverse events associated with these uses. doTERRA does encourage dilution for specific oils such as Wintergreen and Oregano and using the oils on the bottom of the feet, especially for children and the elderly or frail, since the skin is tougher there. Also, many of the people with doTERRA are very experienced using essential oils and because of this experience can say with a good deal of confidence that the oils are not dangerous to any particular group of people, including pregnant women and their babies. They also support valid scientific research on essential oils. I have checked their information with my professional aromatherapy texts and they are accurate.
I especially wanted to research what the sales rep claimed about the FDA approval. She absolutely said that they had some sort of FDA approval for internal use – theraputic grade. I have it right here in my notes. I was skeptical… I also raised my hand and asked about allergies and reactions and internal use. Since I am a doula and have been told by aromatherapists that unless I become certified I really shouldn’t be using aromatherapy I was interested in their view on this. The sales rep said she had no idea about possible reactions and since their products were pure then there shouldn’t be any reactions and they can absolutely be used internally where indicated. In fact during the presentation she encouraged us all to try several things internally and wiped almost every other oil on our skin.
Quality Standards & Control: Proprietary “Seed to Seal®” production process. Subjected to strict requirements set forth in the CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade® quality protocol. “Source to You” production process. Third-party tested and all test results are fully disclosed on their website. GC/MS Testing, plus their proprietary S.A.A.F.E. Promise™. E.D.E.N.S Guarantee.
The primary constituents are listed, but not in any proportion and I haven’t the foggiest what specific gravity, refractive index, or optical rotation levels are appropriate for what I’m doing (natural perfumery). Steffen Arctander’s “Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin” is a big help overall, but I was wondering if you could comment on this.
In order to know if an essential oil is pure and true it must be tested in a chemistry lab. The Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) test is a standard in the industry. This test separates and analyzes the chemical compounds while confirming the elemental composition within a sample, helping chemists to determine whether or not the essential oil has been tainted. Good companies will have third-party GC/MS reports for every batch of oil available for you to read.
Thank you so much for this excellent distillation! I’m just beginning to use EO’s, and have had such excellent results that I am encouraged to try more — thank you for helping me find reputable companies to purchase from. The pricing comparison was especially helpful. My only issue so far is with Aura Cacia — the lids are so hard to get off the bottles — my 71 year old hands just can’t exert that much pressure any more — I emailed the company thru their website, and was sent alternative bottle caps, that didn’t even fit the bottles. Alas, not buying from them any more, which is unfortunate, since they are readily available in local stores. However, online ordering is easy and quick. Thank you once again!
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We apologize if one of our consultants has mislead you in anyway (sic).  All of our oils are FDA approved as being Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade (CPTG). DoTERRA’s, CPTG essential oils are 100% pure natural aromatic compounds carefully extracted from plants.  They do not contain fillers or artificial ingredients that would dilute their active qualities and are free of contaminants such as pesticides or other chemical residues.  All of our products are taken through a series of tests including  AFNOR and ISO standards for purity, and all of our manufactures must maintain a GMP certification.  Therefore, we are passing government regulations.  The FDA has provided us with the label of CPTG. We hope we have resolved your concern.
Standardized oils are not always clearly marked as such. Additionally, some essential oils are tampered with, also known as adulterated, in order to give the illusion that the oil is of an higher quality than it is, or to extend more costly oils in order to make more money on the sale of the oil. For example, the pricey Japanese citrus Yuzu Essential Oil resembles a combination of grapefruit and mandarin essential oils. Some sellers may be tempted to blend grapefruit and mandarin essential oils together and market the blend as the more expensive Yuzu Essential Oil. Patchouli Essential Oil is sometimes extended with the addition of less costly balsams or cedarwood. Lavender Essential Oil is sometimes adulterated by the addition of more linalyl acetate.
Essential oils are also known as volatile oils because they evaporate quickly after coming in contact with oxygen. An essential oil is, simply put, the "essence" of a plant, obtained by water or steam distillation, or by cold pressing (for citrus peel oils). Through this process, the oils inside a plant can be extracted into a highly concentrated form.

Knowing the average cost of a good quality oil needs to be taken into consideration when purchasing from large companies with large marketing agendas. Marketing costs a lot of money, as do quality essential oils, so be certain that every dollar of your hard-earned money is going fully into the quality of the essential oil rather than its promotion, advertising and salespeople.
I think everyone should check out NYROrganic because it truly is the MOST ethical company I have discovered. It has had a thriving store in covenant gardens in the UK for over 30 years. They own their own farms and distilleries. It is a family owned and operated company with all organic herbs and plants. The prices are the most reasonable I have seen for it’s quality. They brought it to the US 3 years ago as a direct sales company and because of the European standards vs the US standards or lack there of I have 110% trust in the products. I am not here to argue but just a suggestion to check it out.

I am all new to this, so don’t judge to hard. I am wondering if ESSENTIAL OILS HELP WITH PAIN/SORENESS? For example, getting leg cramps in the middle of the night where it wakes you up from a dead sleep and all you can think of doing is walking it off and then the aftermath soreness is still there gets quite aggravating after about the first two times. Being a semi non believer in pills, I’m looking for alternatives. Would essential oils be something that would help in this particular situation? If so, any recommendations? THANKS IN ADVANCE!
I’m a distributor with Young Living Essential Oils – have been for 4 years. I’ve always used the oils NEAT and my children and I ingest them daily without problem. You’re being very narrow minded with your comment, as you should know (as an aromoatherapist student) that there are a number of different aromatherapy methods out there to which aromatherapist follow…these methods include:
As far as a hard copy, we won’t have one with the course, specifically. We may do that down the road, and it’s good to know people, like you, would benefit from it. But since I know this is important to many of you, here’s what I’ve done. I’m going to provide transcripts, PDF downloads and worksheets of every portion of the course. That way you can print off ANY of the sections you want to and go through the physical slides, transcripts or readings on paper.

Hi. I have been buying my eos from a wholesaler called Bulk Apothecary at a very cheap price. They claim to be very pure and high quality, but the labels on products are pretty vague and I dont have much to compare the quality to, as I have never spent the extra money on more expensive ones. I cant. but I am a firm believer in using them, and am trying to build my collection. Do you know much about this company and their supply of eos? I would appreciate any feedback. Thank you.
When taken orally, essential oils are broken down by the liver into what are generally referred to phytochemicals, compounds that could affect health. If too many of these phytochemicals accumulate in the liver before the liver can properly process them, they could reach toxic levels. This is a potential side effect of essential oils MLM companies like Young Living and doTerra commonly recommend for oral use, like peppermint.

Use the tips within AromaWeb's How to Buy Essential Oils article to guide you on what to look for when considering suppliers. Companies that use the terms "therapeutic grade" and "aromatherapy grade" may simply be trying to quickly convey to you that their oils were carefully chosen and tested for use by those practicing holistic aromatherapy. Some companies still have no idea that these terms are confusing.
Hi, I was wondering if you have heard of White Lotus Aromatics? If so what are your thoughts on them? I’m somewhat new to the essential oil life, I just bought a couple of oils from Rocky Mountain Essential Oils, but I’m going further down the rabbit hole in my research for the best essential oils out there. I’ve been reading a lot on White Lotus, but will also be checking out Native Americans.
I just started using EO’s, several of my friends sell YL EO’s and that is all they recommend, however, doing my own research I’ve settled on Mountain Rose Herb. The EO’s are great quality and are resonable. I’ve bought twice as much for half the price. I like MRH because it is organic, sustainable and fair trade. Use your own judgement and choose what you think is best. I will say this, everytime I’m on facebook and some one asks about EO’s I do recommend MRH with no sales pitch, just “try MRH” and almost the next post is a marketing speech telling the same person about YL and why they are the only ones to go with. So like I said, do your research and I’d say “try MRH”
Do not use essential oils internally unless directed by a qualified practitioner or using a professionally formulated blend labeled for internal use. Safety Guidelines for dilution and use must be followed. Any essential oils used must be pure and genuine. NAHA recommends purchasing from a reputable supplier who analyzes their oils by GC/MS. Please visit NAHA's approved schools to explore education in aromatherapy.
Do they sell essential oils of plants that are endangered? There are quite a few companies that are harvesting and using essential oils of plants that are endangered. You should be asking where your essential oil has come from; is it “endangered” and is the supplier trying to sell you an inferior/substituted product in its place, claiming that it is the same “quality” and standard.  If it is extracted from an endangered plant species, what is the current level of threat to that plant species? Finally, is there an alternative essential oil, with similar chemical components and properties that you could be using? You can keep track of current endangered aromatic species on cropwatch.org

Ryan is an athlete, animal lover and vegan food fanatic! Ryan is also a sponsored Posha Green super-heavyweight bodybuilder. Ryan aims to inspire others to set and achieve their goals in the weight room the classroom, sports and in real life. Ryan stands as a testament to the health benefits of a healthy vegan diet! On his website he offers online coaching and nutrition programs. Check it out!
Wondering how those great smelling essential oils are made? Turns out, essential oils aren’t “made” at all. They ARE “extracted” from plants, herbs and spices. But just because they are extracted from plants doesn’t mean the way they’re sourced is all the same. In fact, the way they’re extracted from the plant or herb can have a big impact on the quality. Here’s a quick rundown of the two primary ways essential oils are extracted from the plants.
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