"When you smell an essential oil," says Tony Ferrari, Ph.D. in chemistry, "its constituents bind to receptor sites in the nose, which read the aroma molecules and send signals through the olfactory nerve to the limbic system and amygdala in the brain. There are more than 5,000 chemical compounds that make up commonly used oils, each of which binds in a different way to different receptors, so their effects can vary widely."
Hi. I have been buying my eos from a wholesaler called Bulk Apothecary at a very cheap price. They claim to be very pure and high quality, but the labels on products are pretty vague and I dont have much to compare the quality to, as I have never spent the extra money on more expensive ones. I cant. but I am a firm believer in using them, and am trying to build my collection. Do you know much about this company and their supply of eos? I would appreciate any feedback. Thank you.

Equating the safety of straight essential oil ingestion to its safe use as a flavoring agent is irresponsible! Bleach can be used to sterilize your dishes when properly diluted—the instructions are right on the bottle—and you eat off your dishes, but is ingesting undiluted bleach safe? No way! Similarly, essential oils are highly concentrated plant oils, ingested extremely diluted if at all under the care of a qualified clinical aromatherapist, and you're being instructed on how to use them by a sales representative trained with deceptive wording and usually no clinical aromatherapy training on the matter.
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Companies that do not analyze their oils and adulterate their oils are not only being deceptive but irresponsible. After all, synthetic compounds in oils such as synthetic linalyl acetate and propylene glycol are harmful to the body and place the consumer at risk. Please do not support these companies! If your company does not display the MOA logo on its website, label or brochure, do not trust it and do not support these companies.
This curated list of the top 10 best essential oil brands contains oil companies discovered by myself during my training towards becoming a Certified Aromatherapist. This is a list, not a ranking. The essential oil brand that is best for you will depend on a mix of things: how you’ll use the essential oils; how many of them you need; and how much you’re comfortable paying for your oils.
When working with children ALWAYS dilute the ois moderately to heavily. If it says 1:4 dilution meaning 1 drop of EO to 4 drops of carrier then you want to double or triple it for the child. Do your research – you can use most oils in children of all ages provided you dilute them properly. My DD had immunizations not too long ago and I used moderately diluted lavender, heavily diluted lemon, and heavily diluted peppermint to combat the fever she had and some Heavily diluted Panaway which is a YL blend to control the pain. They worked wonderfully and she was a happy camper by that evening. The next day which is typically the worst she was her normal self and you couldn’t tell that she had been given shots the day before.

I have heard you can take essential oils in water if you mix honey in first. Is this true. Also what is your though on the neat use of oils and the internal use of many oils that some MLM companies say its ok. Is it safe. Is there research showing its safe. I would really love to know this because I have heard so many different opinions. Thanks in advance. 🙂
* It’s important to note that essential oils are incredibly powerful and need to be used very very wisely. You need to know what can or can’t be put on skin directly, and only use internally under the care of someone who really knows what they are doing.  I’ve burnt myself using too many drops of certain oils in the bath and have been silly in the past putting some oils on my skin undiluted – ouch!
I’ve read the other blog about homemade deodorant and im looking to give it a shot. recently ive had painful reactions to deodorant and antiperspirant (all types and brands, even natural or organic like toms and green beaver) so im trying to get down to fewer and fewer ingredients. i have some essential tea tree oil and mixed it with some coconut oil but i still stink 🙁 . Im looking for an oil that i can use that will be strong but relatively “neutral” in smell ( im a guy so im not too interested in smelling like lavender), but it has to be able to be put on my skin without any reactions. Anyone have any suggestions?

Just wanted to take a moment to thank you. I’ve found this article and others by you to be some of the most clear and truly informative I’ve come across! I’ve used essential oils at times during my almost 12 years as a massage therapist, but I’ve recently started to use them more to benefit the well-being of my family. I’ve been hearing a lot about neat and internal use lately, and I wanted to be sure I know how to use them safely. Thanks to your information, I now feel I know how to do so. So, again, thank you for providing such good information. I truly appreciate it! It’s refreshing to read about essential oils and not feel like I have to read between the lines or cut through loads of bias to get to the truth!


Thank you so much for this. I am being bombarded by doterra reps right now. I believe in essential oils but dislike mlm companies because they are so overpriced to pay down tge food line. I do have a few purchased from some others you have mentioned above and some not. Now I have a good place to start to build my own kits and feel confudent it will be a good oil. Thank you again.


I want to let you know that I am a distributor that does NOT encourage the internal ingestion of straight essential oils and caution against the use of multiple supplements at one time. I am also not alone in my position and there are many of us that don't. I have a medical/science brain and use essential oils with a goal to improve our well-being while reducing toxins in my home and around my family. I am not a Dr nor certified health practitioner so do not prescribe or consult on what someone should be using for ailments. I do follow my country's natural health products claims regarding many of the oils I sell and encourage people to do their own research as I have done.
Now, I looked at the ingredients for Terra Greens and, all opinions and facepalming and "why don't they just grind up the whole peel and root?!" aside, the first thing that stood out to me was that the 30 mg of "proprietary blend" that include the EOs in this product list no further info than that. So the questions become, "how MUCH lemon EO" and "how MUCH ginger root EO" is actually in this, and is the rest of the 30mg a benign medium or another active ingredient? These answers are not discernible from the label, which is both useless and dangerous at the same time. You don't know how much of any of this you're intaking, or what it fully consists of. As a dry preparation of EOs, if the EOs in this product are not from actually grinding up the whole food, I assume it's EOs sprayed onto some kind of dry material (in the case of herbal extracts, usually leaves) for use. How much is sprayed on and what it is sprayed onto... ???
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

I myself have a preference for a particular company because of my own personal results and the consistent reports of my clients. I am also passionate about quality due to the way I use oils. I do stick with what has worked for me and my clients consistently. However, when reporting the information on this blog, I try to keep the facts and put my experience and company suggestions in a separate section and on a different website clearly delineated.

I personally have used essential oils as a massage therapist for over 22 years, and have used oils from many companies… Young Living, Aura Cacia, organic, no-name oils that I’ve purchased from various websites, and most recently Doterra. It doesn’t matter if a company is an MLM, mom and pop, corporation or anything else for that matter….what matters is whether or not their product is GOOD!


No, both our pure and natural essential oils and our certified organic essential oils are never diluted or watered down in any way. We do offer a variety of essential oil blends, some of which are combined with carrier oils such as jojoba, but these blends are manufactured specifically as blends and are clearly labeled as such to avoid any confusion.
Rocky Mountain Oils (RMO) is a company based out of Orem, Utah, operating since 2004 and one of the leading essential oil brands available today. Not only can you buy essential oils at RMO, you’ll also find a comprehensive line-up of skin care, cleaning, wellness, body care, natural supplements, or aromatherapy blending supplies on their online shop.

Bath: Avoid dripping your essential oil directly into the bath water; you always want to mix it first with a natural emulsifier like honey, milk, a carrier oil, or even sea salt. Doing this will help emulsify and disperse the essential oils into the water. If you don’t do this, the oils will simply sit on the surface of the water and come into direct contact with your skin, possibly causing burns and dermal toxicity.
This great information provided by all. I don’t believe the originator of this blog is stating the oils are good or bad, but stating that FDA has them approved. I have been purchasing essential oils from several companies, and before I do I find out if there are additives, water downed (yes someone told me they water down their oil to make it go further). In my research, there is NO FDA approval for internal or external use. All my companies have a disclaimer stating same whether in oils, bath salts or incense. There are standards the FDA puts out, but not ‘approvals’.

CBD is short for cannabidiol which is a compound found in the marijuana plant. The other compound that most people are more familiar with is THC, which is what classifies marijuana as a psychoactive drug. CBD DOES NOT contain the side effects of THC. For years, the effect of CBD oil for inflammation, fibromyalgia, and depression has been studied by medical experts. Though CBD ointment for pain has been used for centuries, studies have shown that the chemical compound found in cannabidiol can benefit those suffering from many different ailments.
Thank you Holly! I’m happy to see someone stand up and clarify the fact that doTerra does stand behind their oils. To state such a statement of an oil to 100% certified pure therapeutic grade does mean something….especially is you consider using them internally or for cooking. If you are considering using essential oils instead of over the counter drugs, which contain many chemical ingredients (by the way, they use the same plants to create their drugs only they change them chemically and add other things), why not go all the way and eliminate ALL toxic and chemical additions to your body?? My suggestion, do your homework and research! Don’t take someone’s word for it in a comment. Buy a few bottles of the same oil (I hope you’ll consider doTerra) and compare how you feel.
We carry several varieties of Chamomile Essential Oil. The German variety is considered to be the most popular of all the Chamomiles and has an impeccable reputation among holistic practitioners. The German Chamomile is believed to be one of the most highly reputed oils for topical use. Chamomile Essential Oil contains azulene, which gives the oil a beautiful deep blue color. The scent of this oil is mild and sweet, similar to apples, and often has a medicinal aroma with very faint bittersweet notes.
I’m newbie to EO. I’ve purchased Peppermint, Wild Orange, Lavender, Clove from Doterra to start with (quite pricey) and then I discovered a nice selection of EO in Marshalls (!). There i purchased Pine, Lemon and Eucalyptus from Plantlife ‘100 % pure aromatherapy grade’ at a fraction of the cost. Firstly, can you please explain the difference of quality with Doterra and Plantlife? And secondly, you say when rubbed onto the skin, the oils need to be diluted – but with what? And where do I find this? (Trader Joe’s perhaps?) What is the safest ‘dilution’ for someone in the journey of starting of a family? My acupuncturist made up a Doterra rollerball ‘Fertility blend’ with Cary Sage. Thanking you kindly.
I use Piping Rock EO and I love them. They do everything that any other brand does advice tried the more expensive ones like DoTerra and I find that Piping Rock is a great product with great results and one that I can easily afford. Sorry but those marketing companies are just about money. I love Essential Oils and how they have helped my family in so many ways with pain and other ailments. I also do not trust anyone who says to ingest the oils and unless a professional medical expert says it’s ok I think you are asking for trouble. You don’t have to pay ridiculous prices for good 100% pure Essential Oils.
I am a Young Living member. Young Living are the purest. They own their own farms, plant their own seeds, harvest the product, distill it, test it, and seal it. We are the only EO that can claim “seed to seal”. That is why it costs more. With YL you can be sure nothing hidden has been added. Other companies state to not ingest the oils. YL are completely safe for ingesting, for pets and children. I would rather pay more being I know where the oil comes from and how it is produced. If you would like to be a member you can get 24% off by signing up. My member #1904120
I have enjoyed reading the continued conversation on this thread. Thank you, Lindalu for your comment about YL not training their people in aromatherapy–but just their version. I have been frustrated about the same thing, as I am beginning to realize that there are a bunch of rookies all around me (myself included), that are almost mindlessly using YL essential oils–even in potentially harmful ways–without having a clue as to what makes them tick!

There are several variables when growing plants for essential oils—weather, altitude, the time of year the plant was harvested, and even the time of day the plant was harvested. However, Dr. Burke says the processing of the oil is at least, if not more, important than growing the plant. There are specific processing procedures, depending on the species of plant. Steam distillation is the most common for extracting essential oils. “The expression method (or cold-pressing) is used to extract oils from citrus fruits because the heat from steam distillation damages the citrus oils,” explains Dr. Axe. A newer method growing in popularity is the carbon dioxide extraction, which uses carbon dioxide to carry the oil away from the plant. This method is used for oils such ginger, clover, turmeric, frankincense, and myrrh.

The current and most deceptive problems are with “organic” oils. Aside from organic certification not regulating quality and not preventing adulteration, is that “organic” clouds the issue of essential oil safety. The naturally occurring toxic constituents of an essential oil are the same in “organic” oils as non-organic oils. Knowledge of what is in the oil is more important for the safe use of essential oils.
A friend of ours recently became associated with doTerra and invited my wife and I to a “party” where doTerra sales reps talked about the benefits of EO’s and offered to sell various package deals or individual bottles of doTerra EO’s. They talked about the independent testing that doTerra has done by outside labs that they call CPTG (Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade). I came home and have been researching doTerra and Young Living on the internet (and believe me, I am skeptical of what I read on the internet), but I am very skeptical when companies make unsubstantiated claims about their products. I read doTerra’s testing protocol, but they say nothing about using an independent laboratory to perform the tests. Apparently there are no industry standards that apply to EO. doTerra is a MLM (multilevel marketing) company, kind of what I think of as a pyramid scheme, so their products are more expensive because there are many “middle men”. I don’t have a dog in the fight, other than my dollars, so I have spent several hours trying to educated myself about equally good products for less money. I settled on a company called Organic Infusions, and ordered a few of their oils, and when they arrive, I will compare with our friend’s doTerra oils and see if we can tell any difference. As for Young Living, Gary Young seems to be of very questionable character when you read about various schemes and scams he has allegedly been involved in. You can read about him for yourself by googling Gary Young quackery. I am not recommending the company that I ordered from, as I have not tried their products yet. There is a lot of information out there, Let the buyer beware!

"Essential oils are highly concentrated, volatile plant extracts," explains Avery. "We obtain essential oils through a few different extraction methods, and the part of the plant we get the essential oil from can be different depending on the oil but is typically the most aromatic part. Rose oil, for example, comes from the petals of the rose, while citrus oils come from the rind."

Those distributors, and a higher demand for over-the counter “natural” remedies free of the side effects that can come with prescription drugs, has fueled a surge of interest in essential oils among people who use either alternative or conventional medicine. Once available only at natural product stores, they’re now easily found at Walmart and Target.


Young Living is a legit company, though their founder has been in a bit of trouble and maybe isn’t of the best moral character, thus Dr. Pappas’ last comments on oil myth #10. (The story is out there. It may take a bit of searching to find it if interested) Young Living has spent a lot of their energy bashing your favorite brand in hopes to destroy their reputation, also speaking volumes about the character of the company and many of their reps.
“This study is a re-analysis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data pertaining to the relationship of autism incidence and the age at which children got their first measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Statistically significant relationships were observed when African-American males were considered separately while looking at those individuals who were vaccinated prior to and after a 36-month age cut-off. CDC officials observed very similar relationships as early as November 2001, but failed to report them in their final publication. In addition, a relationship is seen when specifically considering children who received a diagnosis of autism without mental retardation. Although this was reported in the original 2004 paper, it was not discussed, nor was any follow-up study conducted. Preliminary results also suggest the possibility of a synergism between thimerosal exposure and MMR timing leading to a greater risk of autism.”

"Therapeutic Grade" or anything along these lines is another common term used to describe "top quality oils". It sounds legit, but it is a marketing term that I am guilty of having used myself in the past when talking about oils. I thought it meant something. There isn't a therapeutic standard for essential oils so the name and any emblem associated with it is virtually meaningless. It's a self-regulated claim like many other healthwashing terms. Cropwatch explains here.
The Accociation of International Aromatherapists (one of the top organization for setting quality & professional standards for the aromaatherapy industry) notes, “AIA does not endorse internal therapeutic use (oral, vaginal or rectal) of essential oils unless recommended by a health care practitioner trained at an appropriate clinical level. An appropriate level of training must include chemistry, anatomy, diagnostics, physiology, formulation guidelines and safety issues regarding each specific internal route (oral, vaginal or rectal).” If you haven’t talked to someone with this training before taking oils internally, you could do yourself real harm.
A Clinical Aromatherapist IS a healthcare practitioner. They are trained in chemistry, anatomy, diagnostics, physiology, formulation guidelines and safety issues regarding each specific internal route (oral, vaginal or rectal). Taking them internally can have serious health effects if you don’t know what you are doing. Other countries have a culture of using EOs and therefore know how to use them appropriately and safely. We do not have that here. I’ve known several people who have listened to their Young Living or doTerra Reps and taken EOs internally and ended up with serious health problems.
In short: DO NOT TAKE ESSENTIAL OILS INTERNALLY unless they have been prescribed to you individually by a qualified and clinically-trained medical professional or Clinical Registered Aromatherapist. When working with essential oils you are ultimately playing with chemistry; if you do not know the specific chemistry of the specific oils, and what that specific collection of chemical constituents in that oil can do to your body, then avoid internal administration and stick with the aromatic processes.
Just to give anyone interested a typical example analysis, the picture below is of a certified organic lavender that I recently analyzed for a customer. As you can see the peak at 26.435 shows camphor present at 0.25%. Also, if you want peer reviewed literature references showing that camphor should indeed be in lavender, just login to my EO Chemical Reference database and you will see plenty of detailed reports, with journal citations, confirming exactly what I am talking about.
Hi, danelle. I have a daughter name danielle, but anyway, I’m marilyn. I love your post. I am a EO user for 3 yrs now. Learning more and more about this world of EO’s and loving them. I too, suffer now with degenerative problems and excruciating pain at time. My question, did u have a daily routine and what oils were u using. I’m trying to get away from conventional meds unless extreme situations. EO’s are absolutely amazing! Thank you.

Hi Dave, So sorry to hear about the medical issues your family is facing. There is quite a bit written about using essential oils for cancer though I don’t have the info at my finger tips. I would be happy to see if I can find more info on where to direct you if you haven’t already found it. If you have an email or Facebook or some other way to be reached it might be a better way to converse. But either way one place you can go to get some ideas about other peoples experiences with various oils is oil-testimonials.com you can sign up for the free membership and then do searches on whatever you would like.”leukemia” “child leukemia” “Crohns” etc. It was formed for people using YL oils to share so some of the blends mentioned will be YL but it doesn’t mean you have to use YL to get the results. High quality oils are high quality oils, that said quality is so important especially when talking about treating something as major as the things you are and in my experience YL does produce high quality oils. I myself have treated Tertiary Chronic Lyme and having used both traditional antibiotics (IV, pills, suspension and sometimes all at the same time) and essential oils and can attest to the oils working as well as any other protocol I have been on without the side effects…well you probably see where I’m going. That doesn’t mean Young Living is the only company producing oils of that quality, they aren’t, nor does it mean I’m advocating the MLM approach, signing up was worth while for me to receive the discount since I order so many oils and I will sometimes order for other people at my discount but I have never pursued the business end of it. I also have and do use other companies oils and think investigating and having several sources is wise for various reasons. Anyway, sorry to go on so much your situation just struck a nerve. Feel free to contact me if you would like.
I was wondering if you had any blends you recommend for his bottom? He has has staph before as well. I have researched a LOT and soo many pages referrals to the brand Young living primarily, their RC blend, lemongrass, and Theives Oils to help kill bacteria. However, there are so many indepented distributors.. I have no idea what I am reading is real or just another marketing scam….. so my question is if you heard of that particular brand? or better yet own any?
I have friends who have had great results using Young Living oils for anxiety and insomnia. I agree with you, too, something from nature rather than something from the lab is going to be actually healing rather than masking symptoms– I ONLY use Young Living. When I have anxiety, I often use a beautiful blend called Joy. It sort of depends on where the anxiety comes from though, so I use a variety of oils depending on what’s going on. Sandalwood is great for old fear and terror coming up– better out than in! For insomnia, lavender on the pillow, on the feet, diffussed; RutaVela is a blend of rue, valerian and lavender and is great great great. Peace and Calming, Stress Away… So many wonderful options. I am happy to help, contact me or use my Young Living #1112524.

Those like myself involved in related holistic fields leave those kinds of diagnoses and preparations to producers who must adhere to their industry's self-regulatory safety standards and have the proper training to perform this service, like studies in anatomy, biology, pharmacology, physiology, pharmakonetics, and industry-related ethics and safety.


Essential oils are all the rage. You know the ones I’m talking about. In fact, you’ve probably been invited to a product party where little vials with expensive price tags promise a wide range of health benefits. You’ve also heard the stories. Essential oils cure warts and ear infections. They soothe rashes and bellyaches. They reduce fever and fight the common cold. Virtually any ailment you suffer has a corresponding dose of liquid magic.
"Synthetic essential oils may seem like a bargain," says Rupinder Mangat, CEO of Mevei. "It can be difficult to tell the difference between a synthetic oil or a real one. But be careful—chemically reconstructed oils seldom include all the trace chemicals that are found in the real plant. Price can be an indication that an oil is synthetically reproduced or extended."
Topical applications: massage oils, and bath and skin care products are absorbed through the skin. Massaging the area where the oil is to be applied can boost circulation and increase absorption. Some argue that areas that are richer in sweat glands and hair follicles, such as the head or the palms of the hand, may absorb the oils more effectively.

We would never recommend the internal use of EOs without the advice from a qualified Aromatherapist or similar as our policy. We also never advise using them neat on the skin as the oils are so potent and so easily absorbed. Whilst EOs are indeed a wonderful product provided by nature, they must be treated with respect and sense, a trait often lacking in general public when faced with their own health issue (if one drop was good, then two or three will cure me) attitudes which have been demonstrated many times in our store.


Have you ever wondered, “What are the best essential oil brands”? Who should you buy your essential oils from and why? Those are very good questions! There are variations in quality, standards of production, company culture, price, and product selection among many of the popular essential oil brands available today. I want to highlight what sets apart one essential oil company over another, and which ones would be the best essential oil brands to start buying from.

Thank you so much for all of your information that you share. It seems like when I google something about essential oils, I frequently end up on your site. I am new to essential oils and not sure what to expect. It seems like when I use them in lotion, roll-on, or even a eucalyptus steam the scent dissipates relatively quickly. I am not sure if I am not adding enough essential oils, if I am buying lower quality essential oils, or if I am expecting too much. For instance, a 8 oz batch of lotion (I used 30 drops total of essential oil)that I made last week no longer has a scent to it (at least to me). Any insight on this?
Now, I don't sell essential oils, so I don't have a vested interest in where you get your oils from. I do sell products I blend myself from essential oils, like sprays and perfumes, but not the straight oils themselves. I was just taught to never eat them straight, and I want to assure you that your hesitation about ingesting essential oils is rational, sound, and safe.
I had psoriasis for years & kept on getting different creams & lotions from the GP but none of them worked. So 1 day I read up fully on the EO’s I had for cleaning & making face masks. I made myself a blend of oils, carrier oils, butters, vit E & I mixed that with some bees wax to make a balm. I couldn’t believe it within a week it had started to work. I thought I might of just been me getting less stressed so it es going on its own but I’ve since given the blend to 2 friends who suffer from psoriasis badly whom also couldn’t get any help from the GP. Now they both call it a miracle oil & have told me I should sell it. However I would like to do an aromatherapy course first so I could make other blends to help people & I have no idea on selling my products, so I’d have to look into that as well.
Thank you, Marcia!!! A friend asked me just this morning about the “Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade” oils she had seen, and my first question was “Certified by whom?” Mr. Wolfert may be correct in saying that the phrase is trademarked, and not to be interpreted that the OILS are certified by anyone, but the so-called “average user” is not going to know that. They are going to assume, wrongfully, that SOME official body has certified that DoTerra has the world’s most perfect oils. Somewhere on TV I saw the phrase “puffery”… Shame on any organization who has to stoop to such deliberately misleading marketing tactics to sell their product. Obviously the truth isn’t enough, some folks have to embellish and mislead.

In answer to your daughters eczema problem, I am a first time mother of an 8 month old. I just took her to an herbalist because I thought she had a rash and he told me it was eczema. She started out with it on her leg and within a couple weeks in spread all over her torso. He suggested I start giving her “Kali sulph” It is a homeopathic remedy used for various skin conditions. He recommended I give her two tablets three times per day. That was two weeks ago and there has been a significant change in her eczema! I do not know much about essential oils though I full heartedly believe they work but I am just a mom wanting to help another mom. I hope you find something for your daughter.
The number of online articles and print books published by Young Living representatives is growing, making it harder for you to discover the truth about the potential hazards of eating essential oils straight. It seems however that all are designed to convince you to buy THEIR product, instead of educate you on the benefits of essential oils overall. Researcher, be aware.
Lavender oil is claimed to have a slew of a health benefits, with aromatherapy practitioners using it for anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, depression, headache, upset stomach and hair loss. Some small studies on using lavender for anxiety have yielded mixed results, and some studies suggest the oil may work in combination with other oils to fight a hair-loss condition called alopecia areata, according to the NIH. However, "there is little scientific evidence of lavender's effectiveness for most health uses," the NIH says.
“Fractioning” or re-distilling which takes place at low pressure and can isolate certain constituents or produce, for instance, a terpeneless oil. Some terpenes oxidize rapidly, which changes the aroma, longevity and solubility of the oil. One should take care when encountering these terpeneless oils because the natural synergy of the oil has been changed. It now has a higher percentage of the other constituents.
Hi Francis – Food grade oils are approved for use as food flavorings, though it’s a mistake to believe that they are therefore also approved as internal medicines. They are known by the designation FCC (Food Chemicals Codex). Pharmaceutical grade oils are usually known by the designation BP (British Pharmacopoeia) or USP (U.S Pharmacopeia). The two standards are the same. None of the grades particularly applies to the use of essential oils in aromatherapy, and many pharmaceutical grade oils are only approved as flavorings – to make a medicine taste better. Therapeutic grade is a great idea, it just doesn’t exist yet!

I really think i would’ve enjoyed reading your article and i think i may have gotten a lot out of it. However, trying to read around the block with “FOLLOW and icons for Facebook, Twitter etc.,” was infuriating!! I attempted to read your site on two different occasions and soon gave up both times. The second time i tried to get rid of the more than bothersome block by clicking on ea icon and choosing one of the actions to just get it out of my way, but no luck.


Examples of these types of essence include:  Cajeput (White Tea Tree), Cedar Leaf, Cinnamon Leaf, Eucalyptus Blue Gum, Eucalyptus Blue Mallee, Eucalyptus (Mint), True Eucalyptus, Laurel Leaf (pictured), Tea Tree, Mandarin Petitgrain,  Lime Petitgrain, Orange Petitgrain, Manuka, Magnolia Leaf, Niaouli, Nerolina, Rosalina, Purple Sage and White Sage.
To date, there has been no company or organization that certifies essential oils. The MOA was established to fill this need. Companies who wish to have an independent organization test the quality of their oils for ISO compliance can contact the MOA to conduct independent testing and certification. Companies who pass these tests can then proudly state that their essential oil is of ISO quality and therefore is a true “Medicinal Grade” oil. Ethical companies will use this standard in their marketing literature. Oils produced only for fragrance need not apply.

In conclusion, the crude oil from C. articulatus exhibited the best results of antimicrobial activity e ability to control biofilm formation. The chemical analysis showed the presence of terpenes and monoterpenes such as a-pinene, a-bulnesene and copaene. The reduction of biofilms formation was confirmed from SEM images. The results of this research shows a great potential from the plants studied as new antimicrobial sources.
Taken by mouth, many essential oils can be dangerous in high concentrations. Typical effects begin with a burning feeling, followed by salivation. In the stomach, the effect is carminative, relaxing the gastric sphincter and encouraging eructation (belching). Further down the gut, the effect typically is antispasmodic.[14] Typical ingredients for such applications include eucalyptus oils, menthol, capsaicin, anise, and camphor.[citation needed]
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