I am confused on your list of EOs to avoid while nursing or pregnant. Many of these oils I have never heard being issues. I use Lemon oil regularly and ginger as well, as a nursing mother. Could you perhaps list effects of each oil for breastfeeding mothers ? I know peppermint reduces production but confused on most of the others…. you listed ” Aniseed, cedarwood, chamomile, cinnamon, clary sage, clove, ginger, jasmine, lemon, nutmeg, rosemary, sage” I use several on this list currently and was about to put in a YL order for clary sage

The current and most deceptive problems are with “organic” oils. Aside from organic certification not regulating quality and not preventing adulteration, is that “organic” clouds the issue of essential oil safety. The naturally occurring toxic constituents of an essential oil are the same in “organic” oils as non-organic oils. Knowledge of what is in the oil is more important for the safe use of essential oils.
Continuing: Environmental factors, like mold or dust, can trigger sinus infections. It's also a possibility, however small, that maybe the trigger of your sinus infection was removed from your home. Or another reason. We kicked sinus troubles here with apple cider vinegar in water. Holistic medicine utilizes a wide array of natural products, including fruits and vegetables, grains, vinegars, fatty oils like olive and coconut, decoctions, poultices, and infusions like herbal teas that can be both gentle and effective - essential oils are just a small, potent part of supporting your well-being naturally, and pose the risk of some side effects some of your other options here don't. They are not the only cure.
This course will show exactly how to build a successful essential oil business — one that could potentially generate $1,000, $5,000, $10,000 per month in side income.The strategies you’ll learn helped me grow my business to 1.8+ million Facebook fans, 12 million monthly website readers, 1.7 million email subscribers and millions of dollars in essential oil sales.

After four long years, CHD Board Member, Dr. Brian Hooker‘sreanalysis of the CDC’s MMR-autism data from the original DeStefano et al. 2004 Pediatrics paper has been republished in the Winter 2018 Edition of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons. The data, when properly analyzed, using the CDC’s own study protocol, show a strong, statistically significant relationship between the timing of the first MMR vaccine and autism, specifically in African American males. In addition, a relationship also exists in the timing of the MMR vaccine and those individuals who were diagnosed with autism without mental retardation. These relationships call into question the conclusion of the original DeStefano et al. 2004 paper which dismissed a connection between the MMR vaccine and autism.

I tested grapefruit oil from Eden’s Garden, tea tree oil from Tea Tree Therapy, and vetiver oil from Nature’s Kiss brand (I think the tea tree oil I bought in a natural food store and the other brands from Amazon?), all on the same strip of yellow construction paper. After 20 minutes, there is a huge oily spot from the Nature’s Kiss oil (and looking at the label, I can see now it is embarrassingly low quality production as it looks sort of cheaply homemade- don’t recommend ever buying that brand if you see it). The Tea Tree Therapy spot is smaller and a little lighter, but still definitely an oily stain. The smallest, lightest one is the Eden’s Garden grapefruit spot, which I’m sort of glad about considering most of my oils are that brand, but I can still definitely see where it was dropped. I can’t really imagine an oil not leaving any spot behind at all, but if I ever find one that does, I would be very impressed.

I just want to add a note here on behalf of those companies like NOW and Aura Cacia and all the others from the health food store I’ve tried. They may have all good intentions. They may or may not be testing their oils, anyone can give a test. The mass spectrometry test will pass with a very high amounts of filler oils and chemicals from extraction in it. These issues may not necessarily be from the owners of companies that get oils out there, it may be from the farmers selling the oils and trying to get an extra buck or from somewhere else in the line of business people it goes through before it gets to our shelves. Our world is very focused on money so who knows where the fault really falls. If you’re wondering what brand you should use, I would recommend the three above… doTerra, TRUessence, Young Living… however, I think its better for people to decide for themselves, so maybe do your own smell test. I’ve also been told that if an oil says “not for internal consumption” then there’s a pretty high chance that it is not as pure as it should be to be safe (at least if its is on the FDA’s GRAS list). I know this is long, but hey you asked right? And anyhow, education brings true freedom.
Think about this for a moment – the aromatherapy industry is not the only user of essential oils. In fact, aromatherapy accounts for a very small percentage. The majority of essential oils produced end up in food flavouring, pharmaceutical, perfumery and personal care and these essential oils are usually modified to meet the standards required for each of these industries.
Thank you for this wonderful information! I have been inundated with the numerous brands of essential oils on the market. I have read reviews, but by far your information has helped me the most. I have been using oils for my Chronic pain & Neurosarcoidosis, always worried if the oils we’re harvested safely. This information will now allow me to make better decisions on my therapeutic treatment in the future! Thank you for your lengthy research!

The most highly prized Lavender, Lavandula angustifolia, commonly called English Lavender, is also sometimes referred to as “True Lavender”. This unfortunately leads some to conclude that the other 38 Lavandula species are not real lavenders. That is false. All Lavandula species are real lavenders. Lavender 40/42 is 100% real Lavender oil, but it is not 100% Lavandula angustifolia. This may be dissatisfying to some natural perfumers, who can contend that only Lavandula angustifolia is suitable in perfumes as well as some aromatherapists who can contend that only Lavandula angustifolia is adequate for aromatherapy. I am also a purist in some ways, but I think the superiority of Lavandula angustifolia can be just slightly exaggeratted at times.
Essential oils are the fragrant soul of a plant. They are the characteristic scent or odor of a plant. Many chemical constituents make up this volatile oil. Peppermint essential oil (Mentha x piperita), for example is made up of menthol, menthyl acetate, menthone, cineole, pulegone, limonene, phellandrene, pinene, beta-bisabolene & beta-caryophyllene. It is these chemicals, in a combination determined by nature, which produce the scent of Peppermint.
This kind of statement has always left me scratching my head. Sometimes it is also stated as “….EOs are the most OXYGENATED substances on earth.” Whether its meant to be OXYGENATING or OXYGENATED the statement is just plain wrong. Yes essential oils contain oxygen but that doesn’t equate to be “oxygenating” or the “most oxygenated.” Those of you taking my Chemistry of Essential Oils course already know that, 99+% of the time, when we are talking about essential oil molecules, we are concerned only with 3 elements of the periodic table: Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen. The molecules in essential oils are mainly mono and sesquiterpenes and their oxygenated derivatives. Essential oils are volatile organic liquids. There are absolutely NO HORMONES (at least not human hormones) OR VITAMINS in essential oils. In addition, of these 3 most common EO elements, Oxygen is the LEAST frequently occurring. If you are just counting types of atoms in the essential oil molecules, Hydrogen is the most prevalent atom followed by Carbon, then Oxygen (again just counting numbers of atoms, not a weight comparison). A large percentage of all essential oil molecules are hydrocarbons (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) and don’t even contain Oxygen at all. When the molecules do contain Oxygen, the ratio typically ranges from 1 or 2 atoms of Oxygen to say 10 to 17 atoms of Carbon and 18 to 26 atoms of Hydrogen (for the most common cases of oxygenated mono and sesquiterpenes). Furthermore, the Oxygen in essential oil molecules is BOUND OXYGEN not really available to be delivered in the form of free oxygen radical or oxygen molecules (of course there an infinitesimal amount of dissolved oxygen molecules in just about any liquid but this is insignificant) and thus not very “oxygenating.” It is still unclear to me what the basis for these claims concerning essential oils are coming from and would love to know the literature sources that the claimants are citing as their support. I could go on more about this topic but Robert Tisserand has already written an excellent response to the “Oxygenating” myth on his website, so rather than re-invent the wheel I will refer all of you to read his comments there.
Of course aromatic materials were used in Biblical times for various medicinal, religious and ceremonial purposes but these materials would not have been essential oils, at least not by todays definition of being steam distilled products. This would have been impossible given that steam distillation had not yet even been discovered! Most people attribute the discovery of true steam distillation to a Persian scientist named Avicenna (Ibn Sina) in the 11th century. There was certainly no steam distillation over 2300 years earlier in King Tut’s time. Aromatic products used during these ancient times would have been of a crude solvent extracted nature using fats and pressed oils and the like and would not have been very concentrated (not to mention that extracted products yield very different chemistry than distilled products) and therefore their use cannot really be related to how we should use the steam distilled essential oils of today.
All pure essential oils have therapeutic qualities..Just because an essential oil states Do Not Consume,or does NOT state pure therapeutic grade oils does not mean it is not a 100% pure essential oil. I am in Australia and we are not by law allowed to state that essential oils can be taken orally as the above mentioned companies do.That does not make the oils I use any lesser quality than the above mentioned oils.I am a small company and to have every oil I use tested to be able to state that they are therapeutic grade oils is a large expense when anyone with an ounce of common sense knows that all essential oils have therapeutic qualities. In saying this I know that there is possibly companies that do dilute there oils and do not do the right thing so it is up to consumers to know to deal with a reputable company. These American companies mentioned by Holly sell their EOs to individuals but also by pyramid selling from what I have been told . As for Organic…you may have a farm that states they are organic, but if the farm down the road is not organic and sprays their crops…well HELLO you cannot tell me that spray does not get blown in the wind
dōTERRA essential oils was founded in 2008 by a group of health-care and business professionals, some of which used to work at Young Living. The founders all shared profound personal experiences with the life-enhancing benefits of essential oils. As per their mission statement, they strive to “bring a new standard of therapeutic-grade essential oils to the world”.
I started using oils about 3 months ago. I put a couple of drops of lemon in my water and drink it, use peppermint and citrus oils for aromatherapy energy bombs, have started using them for cleaning, and, I just found a great deoderant recipe that works for me! I’m a fairly large woman (5’10”, 300 pounds) and I sweat a lot, but this recipe works. I use 20 drops each of lemon, frankincense, and lavender in a small roller bottle topped with melted coconut oil. My pits don’t smell at all, even after a fairly hard workout. Some people like fractionated coconut oil, and others like grape seed oil. I prefer melted coconut oil because I like a slightly thicker viscosity. Plus, if it solidifies, just shake the bottle repeatedly and it will get back to normal. For those that want a spray recipe, fill your same 20 drops of each oil into a 3 oz spray bottle and then top it off with witch hazel.
Thank you for the information you shared, it is great. Although, I am wondering why the company I am going through says you can consume their oils internally, and use it on your body as it is. Furthermore, I am informed that this company sells the purest form of oil out there. I found oils on Puritan’s Pride, and they say the oils there are 100 per cent pure. I certainly love their prices. I will be checking out the list you have above. I am new to this, so I need as much information as possible, and if you can help me with the above concerns, I will be so grateful. Thank you in advance.
When people recommend EO ingestion, I wonder "what happened to herbal teas?" Infused vinegars even? Not only does steeping the whole plant in water give you enough active ingredient to be effective, but it also gives you all the buffers and synergists the plant has to offer that helps the body gently, properly, and completely process the active ingredient. If you're going to advocate ingesting the potent extract of EOs, you might as well advocate the potent extracts of active plant ingredients packaged and sold as pharmaceuticals. Same idea - taking a super concentrated dose of only active ingredient to target an ailment doesn't help the body restore the balance it needs to support its own health - the wisdom of traditional herbalism.
“today, more than 7,000 medicines are in development globally, all of which have the potential to help patients in the United States and around the world.  According to another data source, there are 3,400 medicines in development today just in the United States, an increase of 40 percent since 2005.” (http://phrma.org/pipeline#sthash.TnxVihsT.dpuf)
Tomato Leaves are toxic, never ingest them or use for skincare products. Strictly aromatic purposes are okay, like candles, however, Tomato Leaf EO or Absolute is very expensive for such a venture. The fresh leaves loose their wonderful aroma once dried, I tried it already 🙂 Best choice will be a fragrance oil if you want to really capture that smell, I know…not natural, but these are the facts. Good luck!
The world of essential oils is vast, intriguing, and honestly, a tad confusing. Are these plant extracts actually that powerful? (Yes.) Do I need to be the DIY-loving, crunchy type to use and enjoy them? (Not at all!) Can I just dab a few drops on my skin and call it a day? (Nope—please don't.) What the heck do I use all these different scents for? (We'll tell you!)
I have a question about allergies. I am not actually allergic to any food but I have oral allergy syndrome from having hay fever. Certain fresh veggies and fruits cause burning and itching in my mouth and sometimes other worse symptoms. I can’t eat avocados. Generally when these foods are slightly cooked or overly ripe I can have them. I’ve been wondering about using essential oils with avocado oil. I’ve had weird reactions with raw almonds but not roasted. It’s so weird! I’m weary of using almond or avocado carrier oils but I like the skin benefits of them. Any advice?
Recently, there was an article from Vanderbuilt Medical Center stating that the Tennessee Poison Center reported a doubling of children and essential oils exposure in recent years. The article did not state an increase in hospitalizations or side effects. Furthermore, I couldn’t find a source for actual numbers. (The full original article can be found here). Therefore, as soon as I read the press release and did my unsuccessful search, I contacted the reporter.
There is a lot of misinformation on the web, in books and by word of mouth, about the use of essential oils. No matter the brand that you choose to go with, using essential oils safely is the most important factor. ALL essential oils (no matter their brand) can be dangerous if not used with caution and care. To learn more about how to SAFELY use essential oils you can read my latest post: Introduction to Essential Oil Safety
The Mountain Rose Herbs essential oil company strives to sell the absolute finest quality of essential oils. All of their products are certified organic, and an attitude of “People and Planet before Profit” runs through their whole company. Their sustainability principles range from Zero Waste Certification to an Energy Efficiency operations program that helps reduce their company’s carbon footprint.
Price can be an indication that an oil is synthetically reproduced or extended. Chemically reconstructed oils called “Nature Identical” are much cheaper but seldom include all the trace chemicals which might be found in any given specimen of a certain plant material. Used mostly by an industry which accepts a standard of between 51 – 96% accuracy, chemically reconstructed oils are not suitable for therapeutic use.
I put this section here so that you can see the different brands of essential oils that I have used. This is not my list of essential oils to go buy. I make it clear who MY personal favorite essential oil company is, but as I stated before, using your own judgment and doing your research is very important in finding the company that you personally want to stand behind.
I just started using EO’s, several of my friends sell YL EO’s and that is all they recommend, however, doing my own research I’ve settled on Mountain Rose Herb. The EO’s are great quality and are resonable. I’ve bought twice as much for half the price. I like MRH because it is organic, sustainable and fair trade. Use your own judgement and choose what you think is best. I will say this, everytime I’m on facebook and some one asks about EO’s I do recommend MRH with no sales pitch, just “try MRH” and almost the next post is a marketing speech telling the same person about YL and why they are the only ones to go with. So like I said, do your research and I’d say “try MRH”
The reason why is that the ISO standard was developed as a very narrow qualification test for the fragrance industry, keeping "undesirable" but naturally occurring compounds such as camphor low because they're not ideal in ingredients used specifically for formulating expensive perfumes, where purer scent notes are more useful than more complex ones. However, the original cultivars of lavender actually had considerably more camphor - and other complex components - than the two cultivars that ISO recommends for perfume industry use. For example, the presence of more naturally occurring camphor, 1,8-cineole, and/or boreal is expected in a blend of the four major cultivars, but not in the two cultivars preferred by perfumers and reflected in the ISO standard prepared for that industry. Perhaps these very compounds in higher amounts may be at least partially responsible for the historical uses and good reputation of lavender oil.
Essential oils are often used for aromatherapy, a form of alternative medicine in which healing effects are ascribed to aromatic compounds. Aromatherapy may be useful to induce relaxation, but there is not sufficient evidence that essential oils can effectively treat any condition.[3] Improper use of essential oils may cause harm including allergic reactions and skin irritation, and children may be particularly susceptible to the toxic effects of improper use.[4][5]
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