I apologize for not responding to the new comments on this post from 2009 and hadn’t realized they had been submitted. Obviously this subject has come up again and people are searching the net looking for answers. Tim, I’ve been working on that blog post; it’s languishing as other priorities have pushed it further down the to-do pile. Tammy, you are right that it is complicated and not an easy task to simplify for the person who has not studied . . . both aromatherapy and the aspects surrounding the essential oil trade. I will get it closer to the top of the list now that I see how desirable this information might be to many of you. Karen, I’m glad you enjoyed our products. My intent is not to “bash” any one company, but I will continue to interject facts as I know them that might be helpful to those I believe are being misled. Danika, you make a very good point that the MLM business model is not necessarily the culprit itself when it comes to unethical business practices. I happen to believe it isn’t the best business model, but that’s another discussion . . . thanks to all of you for taking the time to share your thoughts.
Clearly this company is misleading people by claiming that they have a designation and approval provided to them by the FDA that in my expert opinion simply does not exist.  Stay tuned for part II of this series which will focus on FDA regulations that actually apply to essential oils and the part III will provide you with questions to ask a supplier that will ascertain their knowledge of essential oils and expertise in the industry.  
Eco-Control is an inspection agency and a certification authority for ecological products and quality assurance system in the non-food area. They certify and control standards for natural and organic cosmetic. Part of it are e.g. NaTrue, ICADA, Demeter and the BDIH standard. The Eco-Control developed their own seal for ecological raw materials and quality assurance systems for producers of raw materials and natural cosmetic. The ecological quality of a product is certified, e.g. essential oils. They are pursuant to “EG BIO” and pursuant to ISO 9235 or aroma regulation proved with regard to the manufacturing process.

In the United States, herbal products are considered dietary supplements, and unlike drugs they do not need approval by the Food and Drug Administration before they come to market. However, the FDA can take action to recall a product if it is found to be unsafe after it hits the market. (in other words, THAT is how companies can put other things in herbal supplements without telling you)
TAOASIS works close with local manufacturer together which produce with loving handwork scent flowers, scent woods and vases. Especially products from german manufacturers are successful on the market at home and abroad. More and more customers are looking for a special quality, appreciate the transparent production process and the possibility to receive individual certificates.
Anyways… people often shy away from the idea of limiting their meat consumption or giving it up entirely because they believe that in order to be strong and lean they absolutely need protein from animal sources. Fortunately, for the sake of the animals and our health, this actually couldn’t be farther from the truth. There are plenty of vegan bodybuilders and athletes, many of which have claimed that their performance actually enhanced after cutting out animals and animal products from their diets. Here are the top 10 vegan bodybuilders.
Susie, yes, I have seen most of the Do Terra essential oils, and yes, it’s almost all hype. There are many suppliers to the aromatherapy community, who provide essential oils that are at least as good as Do Terra, and often cost less because they don’t have the whole multi-level marketing structure to finance. I think it’s very sad that the MLM companies find it necessary to resort to negative marketing in order to sell their essential oils.
Frankincense calms the digestive and nervous systems, and relieves anxiety and emotional upsets, just rub a few drops behind your ears and on wrists to ease stress. Use a diffuser in your room to uplift your mood. Frankincense is a great essential oil to help heal burns, scrapes, cuts, and oozing sores. Just add a few drops to a base such as coconut oil and rub into the broken skin. Add a few drops to a handkerchief and inhale to relieve nasal congestion.

Aromatherapy is a form of alternative medicine in which healing effects are ascribed to the aromatic compounds in essential oils and other plant extracts. Aromatherapy may be useful to induce relaxation, but there is not sufficient evidence that essential oils can effectively treat any condition.[23] Essential oils should not be interpreted to be cures for chronic disease, or other illnesses, as scientific research does not support this.[24] Much of the research on the use of essential oils for health purposes has serious methodological errors. In a systemic review of 201 published studies on essential oils as alternative medicines, only 10 were found to be of acceptable methodological quality, and even these 10 were still weak in reference to scientific standards.[25] Use of essential oils may cause harm including allergic reactions and skin irritation; there has been at least one case of death.[26] As such, the use of essential oils as an alternative medicine should be approached with caution.
The MOA will conduct various tests on each batch of oil. These tests will include Gas Chromatography having a column length 50 or 60 meters in order to accurately determine the oil constituents according to their certification process. This is not the only method that will be used due to the fact that creative chemical engineers can sneak synthetic ingredients into oils that GC equipment alone cannot pick up. However, using other methods, we will be able to determine whether or not an oil has been adulterated.
It's a hard breakthrough to make, but just consider that while EOs have their place in the realm of individual well-being, not all companies selling them do. I disagree that my issues with these companies are my own to deal with, implying they should be kept to myself, a common affiliated statement to make. I feel rather the false and risky use information being promoted in order to use up product and increase sales for these companies are a public health hazard that needs to be brought to light. You do not have to agree, but I will not be visiting your articles to tell you you shouldn't be writing them.
"Untrained lay people, especially in the multilevel marketing (MLM) business, will say anything to make a sale," Trattner explains. Some folks, especially MLM bloggers—and even some big companies—suggest methods for essential oil use, without informing people of the dangers of using essential oils incorrectly. They’ll say that you can use them anytime, anywhere. In demonstrations, they might dab some on their wrist or talk about how oils can be used in capsules.
I’m a newbie to essential oils. My daughter-in-law became a consultant for YL oils in the fall. I’m just now researching essential oils and noticed a huge difference in YL oils and others I’ve found online. My question is how do I know when cheaper is just as good, cheaper is the same quality or you get what you pay for, cheap equals cheap quality. Also what is a good carrier for rubbing oils? Thank you for your help.
Thank you for writing your article. It is honestly one of the few I've read that really does not seem biased one way or the other. I certainly don't like finding article after article written by company reps about how safe their product is for this use or that use, they are hardly an objective source. A lot of other articles really seem to have a personal vendetta against one specific company as opposed to taking issue with the actual product usage, that sends off alarm bells for me too. You nicely balanced the line between potential benefit vs. potential harm & I thank you for that. While I do rep for a company I do advocate against some of their advice adamantly (drinking eo's in water? doesn't anyone remember the saying "they mix like oil & water" meaning they don't). I'm a big believer in doing your own research no matter what & if you don't feel comfortable doing or using something then trust your gut, at the end of the day it is your body not mine or that rep's. You can still reap the benefits without following x companies "regimen" to the letter. As far as dilution, I'm amazed at some of the stories I've read about people using copious amounts of oils neat that I can barely stand smelling 1 drop off heavily diluted. Whether some of it is people just assuming if a little is good more must be better & of course there are the reps who gloss right over the importance of dilution, some of the stories just make my brain come to a halt. I still double check my prescription bottles every time I use them, it seems so crazy to me how many people don't bother to even read the label right on the side of the bottle. I do wish these companies (the one I rep for included) would spend more time & effort on making sure reps understand the importance of dilution & potential adverse effects from intenal use & that just because one person can use an oil safely one way does not automatically mean everyone can. I also wish they would provide more info about how to identify signs of potential overdose, especially on kids & animals whose liver functions may be different or aren't fully developed, perhaps if nothing else to encourage responsible use & self education. I look forward to reading more of your articles. I'd be curious to hear your thoughts on the softgel supplements that the companies have added to their product lines, there seems to be very little out there regarding those specifically.
The Lime Essential Oil has a fresh, sharp citrusy scent that revitalizes the atmosphere, and is popular in facial cleansers, toners and splashes wherein it acts as an astringent and can be used on oily skin. Key Lime is less sweet and is frequently used in many products, whereas the Tahiti/Persian Lime variety has a uniquely spicy fragrance and is commonly used in aromatherapy.

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A Clinical Aromatherapist IS a healthcare practitioner. They are trained in chemistry, anatomy, diagnostics, physiology, formulation guidelines and safety issues regarding each specific internal route (oral, vaginal or rectal). Taking them internally can have serious health effects if you don’t know what you are doing. Other countries have a culture of using EOs and therefore know how to use them appropriately and safely. We do not have that here. I’ve known several people who have listened to their Young Living or doTerra Reps and taken EOs internally and ended up with serious health problems.
What you could do is use one of the safer mint essential oils as a flavoring. I have a great recipe for peppermint brownies and just made homemade ranch with Basil EO. If you have a highly tested pure oil than the therapeutic benefits are really great for using certain ones as flavoring in food or water. Always use a very pure oil that says safe for internal use on the bottle and that is on the FDA’s GRAS list. Peppermint is a great one to replace Wintergreen but Spearmint would also really work and has a more gentle effect in regard to its therapeutic properties.
Hi Jean. The issue this particular article addresses isn't about simply using essential oils, but rather ingesting them undiluted. Eating oils straight from the bottle as promoted by sales reps like Young Living is an unsafe practice that carries with it at least the potential for side effects and has been well documented as causing mild to severe injuries over the past several years, including esophagus burning/scarring and death. Dropping the oil in water does not help dilute it, as oil and water don't mix. That's why the oil floats to the top. As a folk herbalist I use EOs in aromatherapy sprays, scented oils, bug sprays and sanitizers, but as the potent, concentrated extracted oil from literally pounds of plant material, I don't eat them. They're not for that. Besides, when you eat them, you forgo the most likely benefit of them - their vapors. Aromatherapy is wonderful, natural, and beneficial, no need to use the oils recklessly. Be well.
Carrier oils are used to dilute essential oils when they are being used topically; they help to carry the essential oils into the skin. Many lotions and skin care products are made with carrier oils, which are vegetable oils derived from the fatty portion of the plant, such as the nuts, kernels or seeds. Unlike essential oils, carrier oils do not evaporate easily and do not give off strong aromas.

Typical research studies involve testing two groups-one group gets an experimental substance and another group gets a placebo substance (this group is referred to as the "control" group). When using aromatic substances, it is very difficult to conduct a blinded study. Some researchers have used masks or other barriers to blind participants. Other researchers have used alternate scents assumed to have no therapeutic properties as controls. These approaches are problematic, however, because people associate smells with past experiences. Thus, it is difficult to account for individual variation in how essential oils affect people.
Anjou Top 12 Essential Oils Set is an aromatherapy medicine chest and beauty box in one. Lavender, Sweet Orange, Tea Tree, Eucalyptus, Lemongrass, Peppermint, Bergamot, Frankincense, Lemon, Rosemary, Cinnamon, and Ylang-Ylang Essentials Oils can be used with a carrier oil for soothing, healing skin and hair, digestion, headache and congestion relief, and massage therapy. Used with a diffuser or humidifier, the calming or invigorating fragrances create stress-relieving home and office atmospheres
So, where 1 teaspoon of dried herbs, or 2 to 4 teaspoons of fresh herbs, usually supplies enough plant oil to flavor an entire recipe, it takes 16 pounds of the fresh peppermint leaf to produce one ounce of essential oil! When's the last time you picked up a leaf? There's not much weight to one, really. Its been reported that a single drop of pure essential oil straight out of the bottle is the equivalent of up to 75 cups of herbal tea.
The brain plays an important role in the modulation of many symptoms and side effects, such as nausea, pain and stress. Aromatherapy can help patients cope with these problems. In fact, the Massage Therapy Team at Nationwide Children’s Hospital uses several essential oils, including lavender, sweet orange, peppermint and lemon/lime to support the well-being of patients. I’m taking advantage of the mind-body connection right now, diffusing a mixture of spearmint and a proprietary blend called “Breathe” as I write this post. I’m not sure it’s really keeping me on task, but I sure do enjoy the smell.
Marcia, I have enjoyed the comments on this site. I would also like to state that I have been doing research on the subject of Doterra’s purity. I have found that they don’t state that their oils are certified therapuetic by the FDA. They state they are certified pure, that is why the C&P is highlighted. Each and every batch is tested and certified pure by 2 independent labs. I also have sampled many other “pure essential oils” and found them all to be more oily and less impactful than doterra’s oils. My concern is that since essential oils are transdermal and most “pure essential oils” on the market today are in reality impure. People all over the world are being inadvertantly poisoned by the toxins in those oils. Doterra appears to have taken every effort to be transparent in their business practices and their oils are the most potent that I have experienced. I have not found that Doterra is trying to hide anything or deceive anyone. I am curious that if you feel so strongly the other way, why don’t you set up a meeting to talk to the owners of Doterra and compare their oils. Thank you again for providing this blog.

I had bedbugs (yikes!) in my hotel room at the Rodeway Inn when I was in Salt Lake City last year for the doTERRA convention. What a place to pose that question – everyone was so helpful! One gal gave me cedarwood oil, another a glass spray bottle so I could mix up cedarwood, peppermint and water to spritz my suitcases with, I sprayed them down before I relocated rooms, dried all of my clothes at high heat through the industrial dryers and the diffused Cedarwood and On Guard in the new room for the rest of the week using a Sprite Diffuser that I had purchased at a great discount from one of the vendor booths at the event.
I'm alarmed to see a business wrecklessly endanger your health and well-being. But what's more, I'm frustrated to see such an irresponsible practice in the world of holistic medicine. The recent surge in popularity of natural remedies has the potential to disarm the strangle hold pharmaceutical companies have on offering relief to what ails us with harsh synthetic derivatives at sensationalized prices. With such irresponsible and unverified instructions regarding the safe use of essential oils internally, the entire practice of using them is vulnerable to attack and public scrutiny. Online backlash already includes articles questioning if all essential oils are just a scam.
Thank you for the information you shared, it is great. Although, I am wondering why the company I am going through says you can consume their oils internally, and use it on your body as it is. Furthermore, I am informed that this company sells the purest form of oil out there. I found oils on Puritan’s Pride, and they say the oils there are 100 per cent pure. I certainly love their prices. I will be checking out the list you have above. I am new to this, so I need as much information as possible, and if you can help me with the above concerns, I will be so grateful. Thank you in advance.

If it is possible for you to give me any of the documented information from which you have been speaking, or direct me to those sources, I would be grateful. I do not doubt what you are telling me, but I’m sure you would agree that telling others “Robert Tisserand says…” may not be as convincing as “Robert Tisserand provided this documented evidence that says…”
Kendra Kirkham wrote a really great article a few years ago for the IFPA Journal “In Essence” about the lack of any formal essential oil “grading” system for aromatherapy and provided clear information about the topic, as well as explain the use of the words “therapeutic grade” as a marketing tool for a certain MLM essential oil company. It’s a shame that many others now elect to coin the bogus term. I understand the thought is to express that their oils may be of higher quality or perhaps used in clinical settings, but use of such terms only adds to consumer confusion. Thanks for bringing this to the attention of the masses.
Some essential oils qualify as GRAS flavoring agents for use in foods, beverages, and confectioneries according to strict Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and flavorist standards.[48] Pharmacopoeia standards for medicinal oils should be heeded. Some oils can be toxic to some domestic animals, cats in particular.[49] The internal use of essential oils can pose hazards to pregnant women, as some can be abortifacients in dose 0.5–10 mL, and thus should not be used during pregnancy.[citation needed]
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