I’m trying to decide which EOs to buy, to start out with, and where to buy them from. I’ve noticed that many of doTerra’s oils are MUCH more expensive than those from Mountain Rose Herbs. Why is that? Is one vastly superior over the other one? I’m on a budget and would prefer to spend less, if possible, but don’t want to sacrifice purity or quality, either.
The oil of frankincense is an ancient remedy for infection, and recently its ability to fight cancer and support the immune system in general has begun to be studied rigorously, particularly in Europe. Scientists believe the main element in frankincense which fights cancer is a compound known as acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid, or AKBA for short. There have been many documented cases of frankincense curing cancer labeled as "incurable" by mainstream medicine, such as ovarian cancer and brain cancer. Research indicates it can prevent uterine cancer or help heal it.
^ Arenholt-Bindslev, D; Jolanki, R; Kanerva, L (2008). "Diagnosis of Side Effects of Dental Materials, with Special Emphasis on Delayed and Immediate Allergic Reactions". In Schmalz, Gottfried; Arenholt-Bindslev, Dorthe. Biocompatibility of Dental Materials. Springer. p. 352. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-77782-3_14. ISBN 9783540777823. Archived from the original on May 18, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2014.
The information provided on this Web site, through its social media networks and in supporting materials and communications is intended for basic, general educational purposes only. It does not include all possible precautions, side effects, or interactions that may occur. AromaWeb, LLC takes no responsibility for how you use the information provided. Statements contained on AromaWeb have not been evaluated by the FDA. You should conduct thorough research via multiple sources and consult with a qualified aromatherapist, doctor, medical practitioner or other qualified professional before starting any new treatment. Information on AromaWeb must not be relied upon for medical, legal or financial decisions.
The word “experiment” in the above seems appropriate. Eyesight problems are difficult to treat, and once damage has occurred, recovery is not always simple. A 3% dilution may not be sufficient to cause corneal erosion, but on the other hand there is no evidence of any benefit. One concern is that the wrong dilution may be used, and the risk of this is substantial. For example, it would be easy to confuse “tbsp” with tsp”, resulting in a dilution of about 10% instead of 3%.

I hear many of your colleagues say the same about offering sound advice for the safer uses of EOs while working for a company that does not. My experience in and intense focus on EO sales and marketing would lead me to conclude that these companies that flat out ignore risks to promote unverifiable benefits aren't just naively overlooking their safer use shortcomings. Money is the only reason for marketing and when profit's the name of the game, you'd best consider not one penny is left to chance.


Thank you for the information you shared, it is great. Although, I am wondering why the company I am going through says you can consume their oils internally, and use it on your body as it is. Furthermore, I am informed that this company sells the purest form of oil out there. I found oils on Puritan’s Pride, and they say the oils there are 100 per cent pure. I certainly love their prices. I will be checking out the list you have above. I am new to this, so I need as much information as possible, and if you can help me with the above concerns, I will be so grateful. Thank you in advance.
You see with the rise in the popularity and increasing understanding of the effectiveness of the use of essential oils in aromatherapy, several large  direct and multi-level marketing (MLM) companies have moved into the field.  As with any company of this type, they have a very real need to differentiate themselves one from others in the field as well as from traditional businesses.
Haluka is among a growing number of people turning up with chemical burns, allergic reactions, respiratory issues, and other side effects from the popular fragrant plant extracts. In the past year alone, U.S. retail sales of essential oils soared 14% to $133 million -- up from $55 million in 2015 -- according to market research firm SPINS. That’s not including tens of millions in sales from multilevel marketers who bypass retail shelves and sell directly to people via independent distributors.
Don't stress: Relaxation is only a whiff away. While there are plenty of science-backed scents for finding calm (rose, sandalwood, lavender, frankincense, and orange among them), Avery points out that in the end, you do you: "Any aroma that speaks to you and brings about a sense of calm and relaxation can be beneficial." Our favorite trick for alleviating tension in 30 seconds flat? Massage an oil blend with calming scents into your temples, which are pressure points.
I’ve seen many comments about using Lavender neat, mainly, on children. Just in case anyone is interested in this case study and research about Lavender and Tea Tree oils causing gynecomastia in boys. YL nor DoTerra could get me to even take a chance on using any oil neat after reading about this. Essential oils are great, but can be dangerous, no matter the maker. Respectfully. https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/lavender-tea-tree-oils-may-cause-breast-growth-boys
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A rash or burn from an essential oil is basically your skin screaming at you “hey, stop that and stop it now!” This is why you should always do a patch test on a small area of skin and wait a while to see what happens before you go all crazy and start bathing yourself in an essential oil that you have not used before. I know many aromatherapist recommend that you dilute the essential oils in a carrier oil for skin use. But no matter what concentration you use them at you should still do a patch test first for any new oils before moving on with the oil. Remember these are very concentrated solutions of organic molecules, let’s be safe rather than sorry.

I am most likely going to piss off some people with this post, but the information that I found was too good to keep to myself and keep you guys in the dark. As always, you should do your own research and question everything (even me!!). I ALMOST fell for the ploy. I got really excited because I felt like I was about to embark on a journey into the world of “top quality essential oils”. I thought that the lines I was being fed about these oils being “Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade” (or “CPTG”), “100% pure therapeutic grade”, and “therapeutic quality” meant that these essential oils HAD TO BE THE BEST. I was about to find out that all of these descriptions meant nothing in the eyes of the FDA and the aromatherapy world; they were just that, descriptions.
Galvão LCC, Furletti VF, Bersan SMF, Cunha MG, Ruiz ALTG, Carvalho JE, Sartoratto A, Rehder VLG, Figueira GM, Duarte MCT, Ikegaki M, Alencar SM, Rosalen PL: Antimicrobial activity of essential oils against streptococcus mutans and their antiproliferative effects. J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med. 2012, 40: 1-12.http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/751435,View ArticleGoogle Scholar

Kendra Kirkham wrote a really great article a few years ago for the IFPA Journal “In Essence” about the lack of any formal essential oil “grading” system for aromatherapy and provided clear information about the topic, as well as explain the use of the words “therapeutic grade” as a marketing tool for a certain MLM essential oil company. It’s a shame that many others now elect to coin the bogus term. I understand the thought is to express that their oils may be of higher quality or perhaps used in clinical settings, but use of such terms only adds to consumer confusion. Thanks for bringing this to the attention of the masses.

Recently, terms such as “therapeutic grade” or “clinical grade” have been used by essential oil suppliers to claim the superiority of their oils over other suppliers’ oils. These terms are not standardized and mean whatever the supplier using them wants them to mean. These suppliers are not necessarily being misleading about their essential oils, yet the terms they are using are not standardized within the industry to meet any specific criteria.
"Oral ingestion results in ten times the amount of absorption into the bloodstream of an essential oil compared to topical application," Ferrari says. "This type of application is usually used for short-term treatment of more serious ailments, like bacterial infections (some essential oils are effective against the MRSA bacteria, for example), viral infections, and even cancer."

I’m sensitive to many sources and when my acupuncturist applied peppermint oil to an aching shoulder it sent me right into orbit. Anxiety and blood pressure were out of control for several days. I have always been able to eat peppermint with no problem but the oil while applied to the skin was way too intense. Now just the scent of it sets me off. Be careful.
Thank you so much for this article! I am not really an EO user, I use a little to make soaps and cleaning products but nothing that would make me well educated on the subject. I have seen YL oils all over my Facebook newsfeed lately and my BS flag has gone off more than once after reading some of the advice, claims, and "testimonials". I don't debunk aromatherapy, I think it can be wonderful for some things, but the way this stuff is being pushed reminds me of the traveling medicine shows that sold snake oils and tonics. The reason I found you is one claim they are making is they have an oil/set of oils to "treat" Autism and as a parent of three Autistic kids with a basic grasp of physiology and pathology I know there is no science that can support that claim. The Autistic community is beginning to be the new "group to dupe" and I was working on a post for my blog as a warning for other parents and came across this. It so thoughtfully explains everything I could want to say that I would never have the time to research as thoroughly as you have. I am linking this post to the one on my blog. Also, I didn't know that you should not use them internally or undiluted. There is a whole lot of that going on with someone I know and I have been saying for some time that I don't know exactly what the dangers are but I know this is unsafe. Thank you again for the science and the information!
Many essential oils companies sell their EOs undiluted, so you’ll have to dilute them yourself (NAHA provides some guidelines on safe dilution). Adults should dilute an essential oil anywhere from 2.5 to 10 percent; for a 10 percent dilution, for example, you'd use 60 drops of essential oil per ounce of carrier. Some of the most common carrier oils are jojoba, coconut, and sesame oil.
*In accordance with the the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, students enrolled in the Essential Oil Institute must provide an official transcript, in English, demonstrating completion of a high school education, college education, or equivalency, by emailing the transcript to EOI@draxe.com. This email must be sent to EOI@draxe.com within 60 days of purchasing the Essential Oil Institute. If a customer fails to provide the requested transcript within 60 days of purchasing, the customer will be refunded of their purchase and no longer have access to the online course.
There is a Cinnamon essential oil, however the flavoring kind you get at a grocery store is not an essential oil in that it isn’t therapeutic grade so it has no therapeutic benefits. Many of these are made with synthetic oils (though not all of them) that just taste like what you want and all of these kind of oils have lots of filler oil like the sunflower oil. This does make it ok that you are using so much though. 🙂 If it were real therapeutic grade essential oil that much of it would be such a strongly concentrated flavor that you’d cut back to a drop or two really quick. It also would be an unsafe health choice to take such a large dose of any therapeutic grade oil no matter the type, source, or purity. I do hope that it helps anyway, but I can vouch for the pure therapeutic grade cinnamon along with lemon EO helping control my blood sugar levels. I love essential oils. Aren’t they great?
I’m familiar with EO at one time I used YL the only problem with that is they were to expensive in my opinion. So I quit for awhile. I deal on a daily basis with fibromylgia,osteoarthritis and anxiety. Due to all this my doctor took me off of a sleeping pill said I was sleeping to much in the day plus I went to the library for a free class about sleeping patterns and I was told to get off the OTC sleeping meds. Wow want to talk about a withdraw plus the lack of sleep I was getting. I was like an owl still sleeping in the day up at night. I had to do something. My sister told me about piping rock that’s where she’d been getting her essential oils. So I got my Lavender and Bergamont and at reasonable prices.Their great I sleep well now.

Lavandula angustifolia has definitely become the gold standard for Lavender in modern times, but this seems to have had the effect of reducing the other 38 species of Lavender to “second rate” status, even when it is reluctantly conceeded that they aren’t adulterated or synthetic. The belief that Lavender 40/42 is low quality, unsuitable for aromatherapy or perfumery and only good enough for soap or candle making is an unaccountable viewpoint that seems not to take into consideration how highly valued all these different species of Lavender have been to diverse cultures throughout the ages. It is the Lavandula genus in general that has been so important to the history of perfumery and natural medicine, and in no way Lavandula angustifolia in particular. The celebration of so-called “True Lavender” is a relatively new fad in the very long history of natural medicine and aromatic art. Even if Lavandula angustifolia is the finest Lavender, and it may very well be so, why Lavender 40/42, which is really just a blend of these wonderful Lavender oils from around the world should be so scorned, I cannot say. 


Your on-line group will probably find quite a bit of information regarding the medical properties of plants by looking at sites/books about botony as well. I'm always amused when I tell people who ask how I got interested in this particular topic that it stems from reading a group of fictional books by Jean M. Auel called the Earth Children series (it starts with Clan of the Cave Bear) and other similar novels. I've always kinda wondered if I shouldn't have pursued botony as a career :) since it fascinated me so.
No, both our pure and natural essential oils and our certified organic essential oils are never diluted or watered down in any way. We do offer a variety of essential oil blends, some of which are combined with carrier oils such as jojoba, but these blends are manufactured specifically as blends and are clearly labeled as such to avoid any confusion.
Bergamot, another essential oil with "multitasking" capabilities, is often used as part of a treatment for depression because of its ability to reduce stress responses. When inserted into oil diffusers, it helped create a positive mood in patients. Besides its uplifting effect on mood, it can also be used as an antibacterial and antifungal agent against E. coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus.

You start your article out by bashing on Young Living specifically but later on mention other companies. I suspect you didn't research how other countries utilize EO for this wordy "article". Also, the FDA just approved a few products from YL as "medicine".... Do you know what that means? Do you realize almost all medicine came from plants and herbs to begin with. If someome choices, makes a personal choice to ingest EO after doing their own research who are you going to blame? I agree with another commentor that I've never seen anyone say Take 10 drops or some asinine amount Internally. 1-2 drop per 2 liter. Medicine and prescription drug overdoses have seriously hurt, damaged and killed many more people than natural medicine ever has. Have you visited the Young Living farms? Actually seen how the oils are picked and distilled? Know that the farms and seeds are organic (by at least 10 years if not more). Do you know anyone who actually uses used oils from YL or DT? Do you know where these companies get their ingriedents and why it eould make a difference of Owning the farms versus buying from a third party? Do you look up to big pharma when they make asthma drugs that cause aggression and suicidal ideations in children? Or antidepressants that could cause suicidal or homicidal thoughts in adults? You think the people who get thode side effects shouldn't have any other options? Where does your hate come from? How have you been harmed personally? Please share your agenda instead of scaring people away from a natural alternative.


The Young Living Speech you give is completely inaccurate and part of the genius marketing used by YL. Oils that have “do not consume” are protecting themselves from lawsuits, it’s a reasonable label statement. I am an educator at a major US University teaching essential oil studies. I have worked in production and quality control of essential oils.

Thank you so much for this article! I am not really an EO user, I use a little to make soaps and cleaning products but nothing that would make me well educated on the subject. I have seen YL oils all over my Facebook newsfeed lately and my BS flag has gone off more than once after reading some of the advice, claims, and "testimonials". I don't debunk aromatherapy, I think it can be wonderful for some things, but the way this stuff is being pushed reminds me of the traveling medicine shows that sold snake oils and tonics. The reason I found you is one claim they are making is they have an oil/set of oils to "treat" Autism and as a parent of three Autistic kids with a basic grasp of physiology and pathology I know there is no science that can support that claim. The Autistic community is beginning to be the new "group to dupe" and I was working on a post for my blog as a warning for other parents and came across this. It so thoughtfully explains everything I could want to say that I would never have the time to research as thoroughly as you have. I am linking this post to the one on my blog. Also, I didn't know that you should not use them internally or undiluted. There is a whole lot of that going on with someone I know and I have been saying for some time that I don't know exactly what the dangers are but I know this is unsafe. Thank you again for the science and the information!

Hi Francis – Food grade oils are approved for use as food flavorings, though it’s a mistake to believe that they are therefore also approved as internal medicines. They are known by the designation FCC (Food Chemicals Codex). Pharmaceutical grade oils are usually known by the designation BP (British Pharmacopoeia) or USP (U.S Pharmacopeia). The two standards are the same. None of the grades particularly applies to the use of essential oils in aromatherapy, and many pharmaceutical grade oils are only approved as flavorings – to make a medicine taste better. Therapeutic grade is a great idea, it just doesn’t exist yet!
Industries that use EOs in for-sale products have safety guidelines established to protect consumers from harmful formulations. These organizations often invest their resources in scientific study to be able to accurately determine safe amount guidelines for producers. A list of some can be found in "The Library" at EssentialInfo . weebly . com, though I just discovered a lot of the text turned tiny when I wasn't looking - I'll be sure to fix that really soon.
Much of my frustration comes from mlm companies proclaiming that THEIR oils are the best and that therapeutic grade means everything. Because there are not alot of distilleries around the world, many of us are getting our oils from the exact same places. Yet MLM’s tend to jack their prices up to over double in some cases, and use their claims as being the best to fortify the price increase. I do feel for consumers though. It is hard to know who to trust. I know of quite a few wonderful companies out there, besides mine that have wonderful, well priced oils. Yes, as you said, you will also pay for quality, but you need to trust who that supplier is. MLM’s will always have higher prices because of their structure. While that bothers me, it is their exclusivity that bothers me more, especially when I know we are sourcing from the same places.
"Untrained lay people, especially in the multilevel marketing (MLM) business, will say anything to make a sale," Trattner explains. Some folks, especially MLM bloggers—and even some big companies—suggest methods for essential oil use, without informing people of the dangers of using essential oils incorrectly. They’ll say that you can use them anytime, anywhere. In demonstrations, they might dab some on their wrist or talk about how oils can be used in capsules.
You said that YL and other MLM companies buy some of their oils from other suppliers. YL’s promotional DVDs and literature make viewers believe that everything in their bottles is in their control from “seed to seal.” However, upon closer inspection of one of their manuals, I do see references to their purchases from other distillers (upon whom they put high standards). YL stresses the importance of such things as the precise timing of harvesting plants (even to the time of day), and the timing in distilling plants (and heat/pressure used). They deem all these things as absolutely vital to making a high quality, “therepeutic” essential oil.
Essential oil purity and quality is vital to essential oil therapy and should be the highest priority in using essential oils in treatment. Adulterated and low quality essential oils are an ever-increasing problem as demand outpaces supply. Using bad oils on a client, at best, results in a lower than expected curative effect, but worse, they may actually have a negative or toxic reaction in both the practitioner and client. Using pure and high quality oils are good for your client, business, and reduces your exposure to liability.

I started using oils about 3 months ago. I put a couple of drops of lemon in my water and drink it, use peppermint and citrus oils for aromatherapy energy bombs, have started using them for cleaning, and, I just found a great deoderant recipe that works for me! I’m a fairly large woman (5’10”, 300 pounds) and I sweat a lot, but this recipe works. I use 20 drops each of lemon, frankincense, and lavender in a small roller bottle topped with melted coconut oil. My pits don’t smell at all, even after a fairly hard workout. Some people like fractionated coconut oil, and others like grape seed oil. I prefer melted coconut oil because I like a slightly thicker viscosity. Plus, if it solidifies, just shake the bottle repeatedly and it will get back to normal. For those that want a spray recipe, fill your same 20 drops of each oil into a 3 oz spray bottle and then top it off with witch hazel.
~ doTERRA essential oils are not produced in Taiwan as Jacquie states. Genlight just resells doTERRA products and similar products. doTERRA oils are produced in numerous locales where the botanical source has traditionally been grown–such as Frankincense from Oman, Lavender from France, Peppermint from Oregon. They are sourced from very reputable growers and distillers who are experts and know their business. Yet, every batch of oil they send to doTERRA is tested numerous times in independent labs (not in-house) to assure purity and potency and is sent back if it does not meet the accepted standard for that particular oil.
^ Arenholt-Bindslev, D; Jolanki, R; Kanerva, L (2008). "Diagnosis of Side Effects of Dental Materials, with Special Emphasis on Delayed and Immediate Allergic Reactions". In Schmalz, Gottfried; Arenholt-Bindslev, Dorthe. Biocompatibility of Dental Materials. Springer. p. 352. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-77782-3_14. ISBN 9783540777823. Archived from the original on May 18, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2014.
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