” Essential oils are wholly natural and cannot be patented; which means that you’ll never see an essential oil in a pharmaceutical drug. As such, you can expect that the vast majority of mainstream healthcare practitioners will never recommend essential oils as therapeutic alternatives to drugs. More importantly, because essential oils cannot be patented, drug companies will not waste money studying them. This limits our scientific knowledge of essential oils GREATLY, and the majority of what we know about them are things that have been passed down through thousands of years of personal use and experimentation.” So how can any claim to be “therapeutic”….? WE all know they work but….
A great many essences are produced from the flowering tops of medicinal plants.  While these are not as homogeneous in their healing properties as other categories of oil source, literally all are anti-bacterial, and many are excellent for digestion, stress reduction, headaches, hormonal balance and colds/flu.  They help us get or stay in harmony, and are often purifying in nature.

In looking at your map, it would only be fair to mention that Young Living oils are multi-level marketed (as are DoTerra). I feel this explains their dominance. I’m sure the quality is there, but those are two brands I refuse to purchase because I feel they are WAY overpriced and over-pushed. I have read many essential oil blogs and narrowed my purchases mainly to Mountain Rose Herbs and a few Rocky Mountain Oils. I live in Tennessee and have them shipped to me. I have run into Whole Foods and bought a couple NOW oils in a pinch and would also purchase Edens Garden or Plant Therapy oils locally, in a pinch. Thank you for your research and sharing!
As far as I can tell, ‘wintergreen oil’ is not listed anywhere by the FDA. Methyl salicylate IS permitted by the FDA as an indirect food additive, when is is a constituent of an adhesive. It is not on their ‘regular’ indirect food additive list – only the one that applies to adhesives. But I can’t see it on any negative list, and I can’t see a maximum permitted amount.
Lisse essential oils purchases their products from distributors around the globe. Sourcing essential oils from foreign countries is common practice in today’s essential oil marketplace. It allows each plant to grow and flourish in its natural environment before it is harvested. Lavender originates in the Mediterranean, Myrrh is sourced best from the Middle East or Africa, and Sandalwood is originally from India. True essential oils have to come from their country of origin to be their most original variety. Lisse essential oils are 100% pure and routinely tested for quality. You can request test results on their website.
Samantha has a popular health and fitness blog called Jacked on the Beanstalk where she shares her secrets to success, including fitness, meal plans coaching and why she decided to adopt a vegan lifestyle and how it has helped her become so successful. Samantha was awarded her pro card in July 2014 after winning first place in the overall bikini title at the 2014 INBF South Western Natural Championships in Austin Texas. This put her on the map as the first-ever VEGAN WNBF bikini pro.
I myself have to wonder about a company who will register a trademark of “Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade” for no other reason than to imply that they have been certified in some way. Not knowing anything else at all about the company, that alone would make me suspicious. The unsuspecting public will take them at their word, when that particular word is meaningless, since they “certified” themselves. If their oils were as good as they say, why wouldn’t they just allow 3rd parties to prove it for them, instead of stooping to questionable marketing?
The information provided on this Web site, through its social media networks and in supporting materials and communications is intended for basic, general educational purposes only. It does not include all possible precautions, side effects, or interactions that may occur. AromaWeb, LLC takes no responsibility for how you use the information provided. Statements contained on AromaWeb have not been evaluated by the FDA. You should conduct thorough research via multiple sources and consult with a qualified aromatherapist, doctor, medical practitioner or other qualified professional before starting any new treatment. Information on AromaWeb must not be relied upon for medical, legal or financial decisions.

Cosmetics and drugs are regulated very differently. Although a few researchers have obtained FDA approval to conduct research on essential oils used therapeutically (as drugs), most essential oils are not considered drugs by official agencies. Thus, they are available to anyone without a prescription and questions of quality are handled as for cosmetics, foods, and flavoring agents.
Janice – no, it’s not at all junk science, and this is what ISO standards are all about – the maximum and minimum ranges of key constituents. This does of course vary with different chemotypes, as well as different species, and it can also vary with geographical origin. So there is an ISO standard for peppermint oil from the USA, and a different one for the rest of the world. (this is not elitism – ISO standards are not US-based.)

I strongly encourage you to get a copy of Higley’s book “Reference Guide to Essential Oils” as it will help you learn about what oils you can and cannot use with children, which oils have been noted to help with which conditions and which oils are considered Generally Regarded as Safe for ingestion. There are other books out there, lots of testimonials by users of EOs, and lots of suggestions on pinterest. Please do not let naysayers like Jena frighten you away from EOs and do your research, learn all that you can. Also bear in mind that each person responds to and smells the oils differently so take time to get to know your response to each oil and how much carrier you need to prevent skin irritation. This is a learning experience that can positively change your life if you let it!


If you dilute an essential oil with a carrier oil to do the “patch test” to see if you are sensitive to the essential oil, and you get a reaction, you could be reacting to the carrier oil. Whatever essential oils you use, you should follow the information that comes with it. If it doesn’t come with any guidelines on the label, I would not use it at all. Some are safe to ingest, some are not. Some need to be diluted, some do not (except on babies and small children, when you should dilute).
Thank you for asking this question! I have spent countless hours researching this very question, and have even contacted Young Living to get their response, all to no avail! I feel like someone is not being honest, and while I want to just go with YL, the fact that at first they didn’t respond and when the finally did (through a consultant who was on a live chat), the response was vague. It just makes me question if there is corruption in the EO industry like so many others. Would LOVE for someone to respond to this question!
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HOWEVER, I am bombarded on all sides by YL folks (or doTerra folks, etc.) who emphatically state that I will be poisoning my body if I use anyone else’s oils TOPICALLY or INTERNALLY–even if these smaller companies claim high, organic, rigidly tested standards. I am no chemist or scientist and I am at the mercy of believing (or not believing) what all these essential oil companies tell me.
“No vaccine manufacturer shall be liable…for damages arising from a vaccine-related injury or death.” – President Ronald Wilson Reagan, as he signed The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA) of 1986, absolving drug companies from all medico-legal liability when children die, become chronically ill with vaccine-induced autoimmune disorders or are otherwise disabled from vaccine injuries. (That law has led directly to an expected reckless, liability-free development of scores of new, over-priced, potential block-buster vaccines, now numbering over 250. The question that must be asked of Big Medicine’s practitioners: How will the CDC, the AMA, the AAFP and the American Academy of Pediatrics fit any more potentially neurotoxic vaccines into the current well-baby over-vaccination schedule?)

Based on easily verifiable info on FDA.gov the FDA does not define the term essential oil. Therefore, a company could create a completely synthetic product and legally call it 100% Pure Essential Oil. The FDA also allows "incidental ingredients" in a product to not be disclosed on a label. This could be a chemical that is used during processing. Also YL reps are prohibited from making medical claims and YL has enforced this when they see noncompliant info online. I know someone who had gotten a warning and needed to remove content even though she was a certified aromatherapist and was speaking within the scope of her training. When I pass around peppermint at a YL essential oils class, it is diluted in carrier oil. That is how I was trained and that's what the instructions say to do right on the bottle! I do not condone casual internal use except for as a flavoring in food with a high fat content, which is safe. The fact Robert Tisserand recommends working with a trained aromatherapist before consuming (although I've read even more liberal writings of his on this) suggests that there is a place for safe internal use. EOs are powerful and like any other supplement (if you are using as such) should be used with caution. I wouldn't walk into a health food store and just pick up random bottles of supplements without doing research. That doesn't mean these supplements aren't helpful. YL's vitality line is approved by the FDA as a dietary supplement and is labeled as such. I appreciate wanting people to use caution. I'm just sick of all of the hype and making blanket statements about MLM companies and their reps.
I happily only use Young Living Essential Oils! Not that there aren’t other ethical companies that produce a superior product that produces amazing therapeutic results, I am sure there are– for me, my alignment is with YL. I completely trust the oils the I put in and on my body, undiluted a lot of the time, by the way. 🙂 Also, the direct marketing/business plan is an awesome one, sound, powerful and effective. Do some research, check ’em out, see what works for you. Good luck!
Lavandula angustifolia has definitely become the gold standard for Lavender in modern times, but this seems to have had the effect of reducing the other 38 species of Lavender to “second rate” status, even when it is reluctantly conceeded that they aren’t adulterated or synthetic. The belief that Lavender 40/42 is low quality, unsuitable for aromatherapy or perfumery and only good enough for soap or candle making is an unaccountable viewpoint that seems not to take into consideration how highly valued all these different species of Lavender have been to diverse cultures throughout the ages. It is the Lavandula genus in general that has been so important to the history of perfumery and natural medicine, and in no way Lavandula angustifolia in particular. The celebration of so-called “True Lavender” is a relatively new fad in the very long history of natural medicine and aromatic art. Even if Lavandula angustifolia is the finest Lavender, and it may very well be so, why Lavender 40/42, which is really just a blend of these wonderful Lavender oils from around the world should be so scorned, I cannot say. 
The products that ZEVA Essential Oils offers are 100% ISO certified essential oils derived from plant sources, and manufactured to contain active phytochemicals from plants without fillers or chemicals. ZEVA only uses oils certified by the Medicinal Oil Association, and we source our plants from quality suppliers throughout the world. However, because of the differences in organic certification from country to country, and even from one state to another in the U.S., it is not possible to acquire raw materials that are all certified organic. We do check our plant supplies for chemical residues in the form of solvents, herbicides, pesticides, and extenders so we can offer products that are as pure as possible, often exceeding the standards for certified organic products.

General safety guidelines include: avoid application of known dermal irritant essential oils on any inflammatory or allergic skin condition; avoid undiluted application; avoid application on open or damaged skin; and dilute known dermal irritants with appropriate vegetable oil or other carrier. If you suspect a client has sensitive skin, perform a skin patch test. Table 1 lists some common essential oils considered to be dermal irritants.

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I see a lot of comments on here that advise unsafe practices on ingesting essential oils and using them undiluted. Essential oils should never be ingested unless under the care of a doctor or naturopath. In France, only a doctor can prescribe injestion and in Britain they don’t advise it at all. There are many cases of individuals being harmed by this practice. Essential oils are highly concentrated and do not need to be ingested in order to be effective. Also, essential oils should not be used on children, or anyone else, undiluted. Peppermint oil, in particular, has been shown to slow breathing in infants and shouldn’t be used on or diffused around them. I suggest that anyone using essential oils educate themselves on their effectiveness and dangers. There are many great resources, including Dr. Tisserand’s book “Essential Oil Safety”. Education should go beyond that of what a particular company tells you or trains you to do.

Hi. I have been buying my eos from a wholesaler called Bulk Apothecary at a very cheap price. They claim to be very pure and high quality, but the labels on products are pretty vague and I dont have much to compare the quality to, as I have never spent the extra money on more expensive ones. I cant. but I am a firm believer in using them, and am trying to build my collection. Do you know much about this company and their supply of eos? I would appreciate any feedback. Thank you.


I would highly recommend that anyone who is interested in essential oil toxicity to read this article regarding safety, including ingestion or neat application. I found it to be very helpful. It is a comprehensive article that was also published in an aromatherapy journal. Ron Guba, the author, is a well known Australian aromatherapist. http://www.agoraindex.org/Frag_Dem/toxicitymyths.html
These 10 myths vs facts might be too difficult for a lot of people who are currently using essential oils heavily, like when you mention ‘first pressing’ ‘first distillation’, i’m sure a lot of people don’t even know the few methods to produce essential oils! That said, it’s good to give another lens to any oil advocates who are simply brainwashed by all those MLM reps.
Analysis of the answer: A triple-layered confusing response that also does not answer the question asked. Let's break this down into its separate parts. First, it would make more sense to simply learn about the safety of ingesting peppermint oil before eating peppermint oil, let alone instruct others to do the same. Next, drugging children has nothing to do with the question at hand. That's fear mongering - associating a completely unrelated and disproportionately devastating idea to disrupt logical, rational thinking. Finally, nature also provides nightshade, oleander, daffodil bulbs and jasmine berries, and if you're ready to eat a big salad of all that, you should at least take a basic botany class.
Are you using it for aromatherapy? If so you should try chamomile or neroli EOs. Another thing that’s great for anxiety is taking orange blossom water (sold in glass bottles either in the import section of your grocery store, or at a store that sells middle eastern cooking supplies) and put it into a spray bottle with a few drops of lavender–they smell amazing together. Shake it up well and use it as a room spray. It can also be used on furniture and fresh laundry, and spraying down your pillows helps great for insomnia caused by anxiety. Hope that helps!
One of the keys to producing the highest quality essential oils is to have the highest quality growing conditions for the plants prior to extraction. For that reason, ZEVA focuses on sourcing our plants from indigenous regions where the growing conditions are ideal for the plants, rather than trying to force them to grow in a non-native, less hospitable environment. Our team works with suppliers from around the world to find the highest quality ingredients to go into every essential oil we produce.
I am still confused about this whole internal taking thing. how can several companies say their eos are 100% and yet some be safe to take internally and others not. also, I have been using NOW eos for a couple of years. you state that they are ok for cleaning but not for therapeutic reasons. can you explain this further? they say they are 100% pure and they seem to be working. would these other companies eos work better or differently? thanks
Retailers may also indicate other affiliations and memberships that show they care about essential oils and the essential oil industry. Some sources may partner with distilleries or growers to form cooperatives or other sustainability initiatives. (Keep your eyes on this website for an upcoming article addressing the critical issues regarding sustainability and the essential oil industry.)

Chemical constituents of Boswellia sacra essential oil fractions were dependent on duration and temperature of hydrodistillation. For example, when essential oils collected from 0–2 h (Fraction I), 8–10 h (Fraction II), and 11–12 h (Fraction III) at 78°C were compared, longer distillation produced higher percentages of sesquiterpenes, between alpha-copaene and caryophyllene oxide (Table? 1). All three fractions were primarily composed of monoterpenes (82.77-90.67%), including alpha-thujene, beta-pinene, and myrcene. Among the monoterpenes, alpha-pinene was the major compound present in all essential oil fractions, ranging from 65.49% to 78.45%. As anticipated, the abundance of alpha-pinene decreased with longer and higher temperature distillation due to its highly volatile nature. Compounds such as borneol, dimethyl ether orcinol, allo-aromadendrene, gamma-cadinene, and caryophyllene oxide were only present in Fraction III essential oil…

Certified Organic: Not officially certified because sourcing happens across a wide variety of countries that don’t all have US matching quality control standards. Same as with the Young Living Oils, they’re not US “certified organic” because of all the rules in the different source countries. Yes – Some of their product line-up is USDA certified organic. Not all of their oils are. 6 out of their 150 essential oils are USDA certified organic. Edens Garden offers both a certified organic line of essential oils, and a conventionally sourced lineup.Both an in-house laboratory and independent labs and consultants perform analyses for product quality.


Exposure to essential oils may cause a contact dermatitis.[20][21][22] Essential oils can be aggressive toward rubbers and plastics, so care must be taken in choosing the correct handling equipment. Glass syringes are often used, but have coarse volumetric graduations. Chemistry syringes are ideal, as they resist essential oils, are long enough to enter deep vessels, and have fine graduations, facilitating quality control. Unlike traditional pipettes, which have difficulty handling viscous fluids, the chemistry syringe, also known as a positive displacement pipette, has a seal and piston arrangement which slides inside the pipette, wiping the essential oil off the pipette wall.
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