Young Living oils are therapeutic grade and some of them can be applied neat but many recommend at least a 1:1 with a carrier. Always research the oils and know how to dilute them but also understand that your body may tell you that 1:4 peppermint is too diluted and isn’t giving you the best benefits. Each person responds to oils differently and should allow their body time to respond to the oil. If after an extended time – YL recommends at least 25 minutes for their oils – you haven’t noticed any affect attempt the oil again with less dilution. Keep track of your responses to each oil and base your use on the notes you have taken.
I especially wanted to research what the sales rep claimed about the FDA approval. She absolutely said that they had some sort of FDA approval for internal use – theraputic grade. I have it right here in my notes. I was skeptical… I also raised my hand and asked about allergies and reactions and internal use. Since I am a doula and have been told by aromatherapists that unless I become certified I really shouldn’t be using aromatherapy I was interested in their view on this. The sales rep said she had no idea about possible reactions and since their products were pure then there shouldn’t be any reactions and they can absolutely be used internally where indicated. In fact during the presentation she encouraged us all to try several things internally and wiped almost every other oil on our skin.
Mountain Rose Herbs – (This is the brand that I use for my business and my home) All organic & pesticide-free, wild-crafted (if available), a wonderful company with great smelling essential oils, for really decent prices. This company strives to help the environment in every way and is a zero waste company. They are certified organic by OTCO and they source their essential oils from reputable distillers that they know personally and trust.
There’s a new kid on the EO block as of Oct 2014. Its called Ameo. Have you heard of it? They developed a patented technology that certifies the quality of every batch of oil as 100% cell permeable and all verified clinical grade. I highly recommend doing some research on it and if you are interested in sampling some of their oils, please get back with me and I will share some amazing stories and pictures of what these EOs can do…ingested, applied topically or diffused.
She was very kind to me and said she had been getting a lot of calls on the release due to essential oils’ popularity. She reported that the piece was meant to highlight her conversations with toxicologists on the increasing use of essential oils and exposure to children. The fact is children getting into the oils and swallowing large quantities is bad. However, this was the misuse of essential oils, not a safety issue with the proper dosing. She stated that she never meant for it to be spun and construed that essential oils were unsafe in general.
Those included in this category are:  True Basil, Sweet Basil, Exotic Basil, Holy Basil, Catnip, Clary Sage, True Sage, Cornmint, Cistus, Wild Chamomile, Roman Chamomile, Blue (German) Chamomile, Geranium, Goldenrod, Helichrysum italicum (Corsica), Helichrysum italicum (Albania), Helichrysum italicum (Morocco), Helichrysum gymnocephalum, Hyssop, Inula graveolens, Fine Lavender, Highland Lavender (three different elevations – 1200, 1600 or 1800 meters), Spike Lavender, Lavender stoechas, Lavandin Super, Lavandin Grosso, Lavandin Sumian, Marjoram cinéole (Wild), Sweet Marjoram, Monarda, Patchouli, Pennyroyal, Peppermint (US and French), Oregano, Rosemary cineole, Rosemary high-camphor, Rosemary verbenone, Santolina, Mountain (Winter) Savory, Spearmint, St. John’s Wort, Blue Tansy, Wild Tansy, Thyme borneol, Thyme geraniol, Red Thyme, Spike Thyme, Thyme thujanol, White Thyme (linalool), Violet (Reconstituted), Violet Leaf (Absolute), Wintergreen, and Yarrow.
I’m not sure what you mean when you say “gras” but I wouldn’t recommend using just any essential oil, especially when you are putting it in your mouth. American standards only require 2% essential oils in a bottle that is labeled “100% Pure”. It’s really unfortunate we have such lax standards. Be Young uses the International standards for essential oil purity (E.O.B.B.D.)
But…. and this is a very big but… like any medicine, they have a list of limitations and potential risks if they are not used correctly. Let’s examine some of them. Oh and if you don’t like rants, then maybe you don’t want to read this post (but you should because I make some very good points). If you’re a rep or a convert to brands like doTERRA and Young Living, I hope this helps you, because much of what you’ve been told simply isn’t true.
Hi, Ok I’m a guy, get over it. lol! I have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I have gone to tons of Homeopathic docs for help. I’m still sick as a dog. :>( I like this EO idea. I got the Rosemary and been sniffing it, put some under my nose and got a tiny rash, now I know why, I didn’t dilute it, hehe! EO is one of the few things I have tried that shows promise! I saw (on another site) that adding Rosemary to a saline solution (2 drops) nose spray, can help. What do you think about this? Thanks, Newbie

This whole topic and the comments are just wild! I actually had to chuckle. I recently became a certified aromatherapist, and enjoy giving treatments, with good results (I myself even feel good after giving a treatment). I won’t even say what oils I use because I see it’s a no-win situation here (I will say that I don’t sell any oils). Anyone who claims expertise and prefers either Young Living or doTERRA is bashed then for using/buying what they like (why wouldn’t you buy/sell/use what you think works?) Anyone who points out the flaws in MLM or the “certification” process is bashed (but no government certification even exists, and MLM is just another business technique). Anyone supporting either doTERRA or Young Living against each other is bashed (lot of mystery about THAT one!). Anyone who shares any opinion at all is quickly rounded upon, haha! Well, it seems the bottom line is this: in our culture, we have all been more or less steeped in the allopathic, scientific model of medicine. We want mathematical, statistical and replicable proofs of any and every method or product used for health. That just can’t happen with the use of essential oils. What did people do before the “scientific method”? They learned what worked by trial and error, observation and sharing of information. They didn’t die off; they managed to stay healthy enough to continue to populate the world, that’s for sure. The greatest boon to the allopathic medical field was (re) learning about bacteria (and very reluctantly at that). The “scientific” method and allopathic medicine has been responsible for a lot of pain, suffering, and deaths, but we don’t hear much about that because they are the ones in charge right now. “Natural” or “alternative” healing is giving them a run for their money because people are becoming more aware of the flaws in the scientific, allopathic, FDA approved, graded and statistically “proven” methods of medical practice. We will never be able to get government backing of alternative treatments like EO’s, because their most basic components are non-replicative ingredients. For instance, every batch of EO’s can come from plants in different areas, during different seasons, etc., which will STILL produce effective, but not replicable batches. The very definition of “natural” includes something that hasn’t been “scientifically” modified and manipulated to the point where it is just like every other “batch.” But people have been using EO’s for thousands of years with positive effects. And if you’re going to complain about money-grubbing, consider the fact that health care in the US is 17% of the national GDP! The allopathic medicine industry needs SICK people, so consider that when you feel the need to demand FDA approval for anything. FDA approval is no guarantee of safety-just do a little research on the interesting history of drugs and health/surgical products that are now being bombarded with lawsuits, have been responsible for deaths, have had to be recalled or have mysteriously NOT been pulled when actual approval has never been completed. I personally question exactly what their approval means-pay offs, pressure from Big Pharma, political/business favors? And don’t tell me it doesn’t happen! Providers of alternative treatments don’t need sick people because much of their practice involves health MAINTENANCE. So, FDA supporters, give it a rest. Supporters of holistic, natural, etc. treatments, don’t bother trying to win over the “scientific” minded people because you are wasting your time, unless one of them shows up at your door needing your help (which you know does happen). The argument is often actually an emotional/cultural/ego thing. Follow whatever path gets you where you’re going. Sometimes we find that our paths cross and we need each other.
“In a base of…”. Unfortunately, many companies will use an extender oil like almond or safflower oil as a base to dilute the essential oil in order to cut costs. This creates a slower acting oil, and one that is much less effective for many uses. Extender oils can also become rancid quickly, reducing how long the oil will last. Even if a high quality base oil is used, diluting the original essential oil limits how you can use the oil.
Natural essential oils by their very nature will vary slightly from season to season. We allow nature to take its course and do not add isolated compounds to the oil to try to standardize the naturally occurring variations of a particular oil. We take both the organoleptic (sight, smell, and taste) and chemical properties into account when selecting and testing NOW essential oils.

I think Lee Tea brought up a lot of issues that I considered when approached by a friend who uses YL EO's. She is a clairvoyant, a better one than I am, and I am taking courses at her Healing Center. She was struck by lightening and had a near death experience, and came out of it highly clairvoyant. She uses the oils for massage therapy, and to uplift moods, she just lets them sit there and people can smell them. I don't understand why you think something is wrong with anyone who wants to treat themselves with a natural substance rather than a chemical one. So far my experiences with the oils have been good, I diffuse them and smell them. But I am careful because I have sensitive skin, and also think the YL ones are very expensive. I'm just beginning to research it all, and don't think I want to sell them. I also agree a nice walk in sea water can cure a lot of things :).
There are certain essential oils that should not be taken internally (this can be researched on Mountain Rose Herb website from this article as they list the ones that are beneficial for internal use i.e.: digestive), but some of the common EO’s may be taken internally when mixed with something (i.e.: baked goods, water, etc.). I have personally used lemon and peppermint for this and I really like it. The standard I’ve seen is a drop per 8 ounces although I prefer about half that because I tend to use it in a larger container and drink it through out the day…if you don’t drink it all right away, the flavor seems to increase a bit over time). Be sure to mix/shake it well before drinking.
Certified Organic: Not officially certified because sourcing happens across a wide variety of countries that don’t all have US matching quality control standards. Same as with the Young Living Oils, they’re not US “certified organic” because of all the rules in the different source countries. Yes – Some of their product line-up is USDA certified organic. Not all of their oils are. 6 out of their 150 essential oils are USDA certified organic. Edens Garden offers both a certified organic line of essential oils, and a conventionally sourced lineup.Both an in-house laboratory and independent labs and consultants perform analyses for product quality.
Jane Buckle comments “the use of essential oils in pregnancy is a contentious subject, especially during the vital first 3-month period. It is extremely unlikely that a nightly bath containing a few drops of essential oils will cause any problems for the unborn child” and later states “there are no records of abnormal fetuses or aborted fetuses due to the ‘normal’ use of essential oils, either by inhalation or topical application.”11

Most eucalyptus oil on the market is produced from the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus. Steam-distilled eucalyptus oil is used throughout Asia, Africa, Latin America and South America as a primary cleaning/disinfecting agent added to soaped mop and countertop cleaning solutions; it also possesses insect and limited vermin control properties.[38] Note, however, there are hundreds of species of eucalyptus, and perhaps some dozens are used to various extents as sources of essential oils. Not only do the products of different species differ greatly in characteristics and effects, but also the products of the very same tree can vary grossly.[39]

Oh yes, as a folk herbalist since 2003 I use EOs, I love them, but I don't eat them - they're not a food (even though now some come complete with a "supplement label" to make them appear so - a product of the company's marketing and label design, NOT anyway affiliated with the FDA!) Any Material Safety Data Sheet on EOs will instruct you to seek immediate medical attention if swallowed. (here in the US, that's OSHA guidelines for the handling of hazardous materials, EOs included).
The truth is that while indeed the camphor should be low (less than 1%) there is almost always a little bit of camphor in true lavender oil, its basically unavoidable. I have analyzed literally thousands of samples of true lavender oil, including many samples I that have distilled myself and I can tell you, as any other analyst who knows what he is doing will tell you, that if small amounts of camphor are not present then it would be an EXTREMELY unusual exception. Honestly, I cannot even say that I have ever seen a lavender without some small amount of camphor, at least not that I can remember.
These texts, as well as other sources of scientific information, detail specific physical and chemical properties of a particular oil. A partial list of the components that we analyze include Specific Gravity, Refractive Index, Optical Rotation, Flash Point, Infrared Absorption (as published in FCC), Ultraviolet/Visible Spectroscopy (UV/Vis) for pigment detection, Solubility, Taste/Odor, Color/Appearance, Heavy Metals, and Predominant Active Chemical Components.
By now it is no secret that the "Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade" label is a clever marketing ploy developed by essential oil marketing companies in the 1990s to convince you that their oils are the highest grade available, and better than all others on the market. Since coming under fire the phrasing has evolved and changed a bit amongst the individual companies, but you get the idea. These official sounding claims of purity are the primary reason MLM essential oil reps cite for why their company's oils are safe to ingest straight, and all others probably aren't. They're also the go-to rebuttal they use to overcome your hesitation of eating such a super-concentrated medicinal substance, assuring you that it is the extremely high purity and potentcy of their essential oils that makes them safe to ingest—the very same reason reputable sources advise against it.
Microbial testing involves analyzing a batch of essential oils for the presence of bio-hazardous microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, and mold. The process involves drawing a sample and then adding that sample to a sterile growth medium in an enclosed dish or plate. The sample is incubated for a period of time and then observed for microbial growth. This test is performed on product entering the manufacturing facility and on finished products prior to distribution to ensure that the product has not been contaminated during the filling process.
 Recognizing this, and so as not to overload the already over-loaded well-child inoculation schedule, perhaps he CDC (the Big Pharma-subsidized and vaccine cheerleader Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) will be adding shots to the in-hospital and irrational Hepatitis B shot that it recommends be given on day one – when vulnerable mothers are too exhausted and emotionally confused to give truly informed consent.
I’m not hear to debate semantics on the exact meanings behind doTERRA’s CPTG rating on their oils. Weather it’s a “trademark” or “certification” in the legal sense does not concern me. What I learned is that the tests are being done and they are extensive. Because of that the company can then give you their promise that they are what they say. There really are extensive test, and they are being done by companies other than doTERRA. I trust the oils because of this and the miraculous results I’ve experienced with them. I DO NOT claim that these are the only pure oils on the market. I believe what I’m reading from other bloggers who stand behind oils that give them amazing results. I think that’s wonderful and I for one hope the market for pure oils will continue to grow. I’ve found that things progress much better when “we all get along”. Working together for the highest, healthiest, outcomes is always going to go a lot further than wasting time on hostilities. The oils on the market that are not pure will eventually weed themselves out among those who use EO’s because they simply do not supply the needed results. For those of you who are new at EO’s, take the time to find ones that work, because the good ones DO work wonders. I prefer to talk about amazing, positive progress in natural health care. I do no care to argue about things that have many issues that have many sides that we may have only partial information about. Natural selection will take care of most of the problems. I will not get caught up in the blogging hostilities that pit this company against that company. I want to spend my time on the positive.
I started using oils about 3 months ago. I put a couple of drops of lemon in my water and drink it, use peppermint and citrus oils for aromatherapy energy bombs, have started using them for cleaning, and, I just found a great deoderant recipe that works for me! I’m a fairly large woman (5’10”, 300 pounds) and I sweat a lot, but this recipe works. I use 20 drops each of lemon, frankincense, and lavender in a small roller bottle topped with melted coconut oil. My pits don’t smell at all, even after a fairly hard workout. Some people like fractionated coconut oil, and others like grape seed oil. I prefer melted coconut oil because I like a slightly thicker viscosity. Plus, if it solidifies, just shake the bottle repeatedly and it will get back to normal. For those that want a spray recipe, fill your same 20 drops of each oil into a 3 oz spray bottle and then top it off with witch hazel.
Organic certification varies from country to country and state to state. doTERRA essential oils are sourced all over the world, so that is why organic certification is not possible. One of the ways they ensure their oils are free of pesticide, herbicide, extenders and solvents is through the GC/MS analysis process, which is one of the 7 ways they test the purity of their oils.
After much internet research I found that high doses of magnesium helped. I currently take 1 tablespoon of “Calm” magnesium powder diluted in a cup of warm water every night before bed. Magnesium also helps with sleep. The magnesium has not been a cure all for me. I’ve also been going to an acupuncturist for the past 5 months which has also helped greatly but I still get the night cramps occasionally which is very upsetting. I’ve also found that caffeine and alcohol make matters worse so be careful with consumption of both.
Some essential massage oils may make their way into the placenta, an organ in your uterus that grows along with your baby and helps to nourish it. It’s not clear if this causes any problems, unless you take toxic amounts, but to be safe, it’s best to avoid certain oils if you’re pregnant. Those include wormwood, rue, oak moss, Lavandula stoechas, camphor, parsley seed, sage, and hyssop. Ask your doctor if you’re unsure.
The Medicinal Oil Association (MOA) was founded to be an independent quality control regulating body for the essential oil industry. It was founded by Dr Jed Adamson ND and Dr Tracy Gibbs PhD. The popularity of and wide spread use of essential oils is similar to the growth of the dietary supplement industry in the early 1990’s but today, just as then, there is no regulatory body to determine safety, purity or misuse of essential oils.
In fact, the doTerra peppermint oil contained ethyl vanillin which is a synthetic compound used for odor! So much for unadulterated oils. You cannot tell how potent, pure, or good an oil is by how beautiful it smells. Some don’t smell anything like you would expect. All of the peppermint essential oils that I have owned smelled like the peppermint that you find in a garden while doTERRA’s peppermint essential oil smells like peppermint candy.
(An example of how you are cunningly led through a sales conversation with an MLM rep is broken down for you in this article I wrote a couple years ago on "How to Compose an Engaging Script", a step-by-step guide on how to talk to someone to land that sale! Keep an ear out for some of these key methods the next time you talk to anyone trying to sell you something they didn't produce themselves.)
I had bedbugs (yikes!) in my hotel room at the Rodeway Inn when I was in Salt Lake City last year for the doTERRA convention. What a place to pose that question – everyone was so helpful! One gal gave me cedarwood oil, another a glass spray bottle so I could mix up cedarwood, peppermint and water to spritz my suitcases with, I sprayed them down before I relocated rooms, dried all of my clothes at high heat through the industrial dryers and the diffused Cedarwood and On Guard in the new room for the rest of the week using a Sprite Diffuser that I had purchased at a great discount from one of the vendor booths at the event.
Amy, organic crops may be contaminated by pesticides from nearby farms, but 100% organic is not impossible, and contamination is the exception. Distillation probably does reduce the proportion of a biocide, but most of them do carry over and will be present in the corresponding essential oil, usually in the 1-10 ppm range. You will get very much more biocide into your body by eating non-organic foods than you ever could from a few drops of essential oil containing 2 ppm of a biocide. Getting back to your question, most certified organic essential oils are biocide-free, but some may contain biocides, and the only way to be sure is to analyze the oils. The presence of a biocide would be regarded as a contaminant, not an adulterant. (An adulterant is a substance intentionally added for profit reasons.) The bottom line is that a certified organic oil is, on average, very much lower in biocide contamination than one that is not certified. Having said that, some oils are biocide-free but are not certified. You might find this website helpful: http://www.ifoam.org/about_ifoam/standards/index.html
Lavender 40/42 is made up of 100% natural lavender oils blended to produce an oil containing 40% linalool and 42% linalyl acetate, which are the two primary aroma compounds occurring in Lavender. This is done with the intention of creating a standardized Lavender aroma, which presents a minimum of variation between batches. The scent of Lavender oil can vary tremendously from lot to lot, from season to season and from growing region to growing region. Small changes in rainfall, atmospheric and soil conditions and cross pollination as well as events occurring during distillation all have an impact on the scent of the oil. Because Lavender oil is such an important ingredient, frequently making up a large percent of a finished manufactured product, variation in the Lavender’s aroma can have a dramatic effect on finished goods. Therefore, many manufacturers count on the reliably consistent aroma of Lavender 40/42.
The Mountain Rose Herbs essential oils actually come in a variety of price ranges. I’ve found some of them quite approachable, but certain oils are again on the expensive side. It depends which one(s) you’re looking for, so the best thing you can do is have a look at their website and shop for the oils you’d like. Keep in mind, this will all be certified organic that you’re purchasing, so the extra dollars spent may be worth the investment.
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Anyway I started to buy them and telling other people about them. One of my major concerns was the internal injestion of essential oils. Although they take E.O.s in Europe, they are given by practionioners who are educated about their various properties, and therefore understand the complexity of the oils, but also the individual reactions one might have to them. I did mention this to an American doterra person when someone came for a seminar in April, and was fobbed off with an excuse.
“Quality essential oils” can mean many things, depending on how you intend to use the oils. To a perfume formulator, geranium essential oil spiked with artificial chemicals to enhance the fragrance might be considered a “quality essential oil”. To a massage therapist, a natural lavender oil diluted in a soothing base might be considered a high quality essential oil. To a doctor addressing bacterial challenges, only a truly pure, medicinal strength, wild crafted oregano oil that is high in natural carvacrol content would be considered a quality essential oil.

As oils are commonly used for inhalation and in combination with carrier oils for transdermal absorption, meaning rubbed into the skin in diluted forms, they are bypassing many of the body's natural protective mechanisms and detoxification channels. Substances rubbed directly into the skin can go straight into the bloodstream and begin circulating - the good and the bad. Ideally, we only want the good entering our bodies in this method. Let our beauty care become our medicine.
The FDA has not evaluated the statements on this website. The information presented is for educational purposes and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any diseases. Always consult with your physician before using any natural remedy or supplement. Any use of this site constitutes your agreement to our Terms of Use. Honest Essential Oils™ and HonestEssentialOils.com™ are trademarks of Embrace Health, Inc. All content, images, diagrams and logos on this website are copyright protected and may not be copied or used in any way without the express permission of Embrace Health, Inc.
The pharmacist have the possibility to vote the “best pharmacy partner” within the “OTC-Studie” every year. Gold, silver and bronce medals are distributed in 52 categories. The “OTC-Studie” of the “PharmaRundschau” analyse which products or product families the pharmacies recommend the most to their customers from chosen OTC-indication groups. The reputation of a company and the business policy is for industry, wholesaler and service partner important in the eyes of pharmacies. That’s why the question after the company the pharmacies work best with and would recommend is an indicator for satisfaction of the customers with their market partner.
Peppermint supports healthy gut function and normal digestion, she says, and can be used topically to soothe sore muscles. "It's important to note that peppermint is a 'hot' oil, which means it needs to be diluted before applying to your skin," said Dunaway. "Before applying it topically, peppermint oil should be diluted with a carrier oil like coconut oil."
An increasing interest in natural products as a source of new bioactive molecules has been observed in the literature [10]. These include essential oils (EOs) from medicinal and aromatic plants, products of their secondary metabolism. They are characterized as having a very diverse composition derived mainly from two different groups of compounds, the terpenoids (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) and phenylpropanoids [11]. These compounds come from different precursors of primary metabolism and are synthesized through different pathways conferring antimicrobial and antifungal properties [12]. The antimicrobial properties of EOs against a wide variety of bacteria and fungi have been shown, including oral pathogens [10, 13–15]. Thus, the use of plants as alternative medicine has gained the attention of the scientific community, since this is a promising field for the treatment of pathogens, including those related to the oral cavity. Considering the increased interest in the use of natural products as alternative antimicrobial substances, the aim of this work was to evaluate the activity of EOs from twenty medicinal plants against both planktonic cells and biofilms of oral pathogens as well the chemical composition from the most active oils by GC/MS – Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry analysis and, the possible morphological cells alterations by SEM – Scanning Electronic Microscopy.
Low temperature and low pressure play an important part of collecting the highest quality essential oil. When plant matter is placed into a chamber and steam is injected, the plant’s essential oil is released into the air. The steam and essential oil are carried out of the chamber and cooled. The oil and water are then allowed to separate for collection.

Clary sage is the essential oil that is most widely used to treat vision problems. It is placed in the eye, so advice from an optometrist is important before use. Clary sage is used as a cleanser for the eyes. It can also be used to clear eye sight due to foggy vision or an injury to the eyes. Clary sage can also be used to brighten the eyes and improve vision. Finally, it can have beneficial results for people with eye issues related to aging.”
And by the way, as an EMT, the results may take a while to see, but there are people who have Kidney and Liver damage and they have been ingesting essential oils. It may not kill you right away, but neither will taking a whole bunch of some medications right away either. Does that mean it won't/doesn't harm you? No. Would you eat six pain pills at once? Probably not.

From what I have read on various websites and blogs there is no such thing as “therapeutic grade” since there is no system in place in this country to determine the grade of an essential oil. Since any brand of essential oils can be used for aromatherapy then all essential oils would technically be therapeutic grade since aroma therapy is a therapeutic use of essential oils.


Haluka is among a growing number of people turning up with chemical burns, allergic reactions, respiratory issues, and other side effects from the popular fragrant plant extracts. In the past year alone, U.S. retail sales of essential oils soared 14% to $133 million -- up from $55 million in 2015 -- according to market research firm SPINS. That’s not including tens of millions in sales from multilevel marketers who bypass retail shelves and sell directly to people via independent distributors.
Aromatherapy is an ancient practice of natural healing and plant medicine that has been documented in human civilizations around the world for over 6,000 years. The use of prescribing aromatic plant extracts for massage, for bathing and for mental, emotional and spiritual imbalances has proven benefits through both practical and scientific evidence.
Don't stress: Relaxation is only a whiff away. While there are plenty of science-backed scents for finding calm (rose, sandalwood, lavender, frankincense, and orange among them), Avery points out that in the end, you do you: "Any aroma that speaks to you and brings about a sense of calm and relaxation can be beneficial." Our favorite trick for alleviating tension in 30 seconds flat? Massage an oil blend with calming scents into your temples, which are pressure points.

I was just barely speaking with a girl who is a certified aromatherapist and she said that people need to be very careful with wintergreen because it is such a strong blood thinner. I think this may be part of why it specifically is deemed unsafe for internal use (whether its pure or not). When it says wintergreen oil on ingredients lists I’m willing to bet it is a synthetically created oil or other form of it rather than the essential oil because of its therapeutic properties.
What nutrients? What cells? Essential oils do not contain nutrients – they contain no vitamins, minerals, proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, or any other type of nutrient. I have never seen any research that pertains to essential oils delivering nutrients to cells. Essential oil constituents have been used to enhance percutaneous absorption of pharmaceuticals, delivering them via the skin into the blood. But this pertains neither to nutrients nor cells. So the statement makes no sense.
I was personally offended by the way my article was treated; at the very least you could have let me know your intentions ahead of time. And, I appreciate that you have apologized to me for this. As journalists, if you are going to present opposing views, I submit that it is your duty to do some fact checking. You have told me that, since you know nothing about aromatherapy, this would not be appropriate. I respectfully disagree, and in this instance you have contributed, perhaps significantly, to misinformation about essential oils for aromatherapy. Fact and fiction are not “differences of opinion.”
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I have called DoTerra on the phone to ask them questions. I believe they have some kind of essential oil that’s for bugs. Bedbugs are an awful thing! I don’t know if you should even sleep in that room at all until it’s “fixed”…debugged, fumigated or whatever is required. Geesh. It sounds like a nightmare. I wish you well with the essential oils. Go to DoTerra.com and call them up. These people (or Young Living) would probably guide you better with their experienced staff. Hang in there.
As far as Aura Cacia oils, they are fairly good for “over-the-counter” quality oils, but I wouldn’t call them pure since they use additives. They may be okay for using in cleaning products and maybe diffusing for short periods, but they aren’t even close in potency, quality or purity. You”d have to use quite a bit more of Aura Cacia in a cleaning mixture compared to your favorite brand.

“V-6” is a proprietary blend of vegetable oils. The above implies that using these oils on a daily basis is likely to have a healing effect in cases of cataract, macular degeneration or failing eyesight. Although the article continues to describe various effects of the essential oils, none of them have any relationship with any of these conditions. So the question arises – how to weigh potential benefits against potential risks?
Currently organic essential oils are perceived as the answer to these purity and quality problems, but choosing an “organic” essential oil does not mean it is pure or even good quality. Organic herbs and food is an ideal that is worth striving for and it positively impacts our health. Unfortunately, regulating and verifying the organic status of essential oils is not so clear because there are no developed guidelines and routine analytical procedures.
Knowing which of the many different species of a given plant will provide the most profound therapeutic health benefits is the first step in producing the highest quality essential oil. Relying on the expertise of botanists, chemists and wellness practitioners, botanical materials are carefully selected for their natural concentrations of active aromatic compounds.

"Essential oils are incredibly concentrated and should always be used exactly as recommended," said Elizabeth Bloom, homeopath and founder of Elizabeth Essentials. "They are far more potent than dried herbs - approximately 75 to 100 times more concentrated. A large volume of plant material is needed to produce small amounts of a distilled oil - 220 pounds of lavender flowers, for example, is required to make 1 pound of lavender essential oil."
Dr. Robert Pappas is the President/Technical Director at Essential Oil University. Founded in 1999 by Dr. Robert S. Pappas, EOU is an educational/informational institution dedicated to essential oil production, chemistry and uses and has the largest online database for essential oil chemistry in the world at www.essentialoils.org. Dr. Pappas is also an adjunct Professor at Indiana University. Dr. Pappas work has made him a much-sought-after consultant for companies and individuals all over the world because the information he provides helps with quality assurance and with learning how an essential oil might be useful. Dr. Pappas created the Facebook page Essential Oil University which is dedicated spreading accurate information concerning essential oils and dispelling the myths that have been hyped over the years.
In order to assess the integrity of the microbial cells, biofilms were developed in a Lab-Tek TM coverslip chambers (Nunc) as described above, and treated with standard drugs and EOs at 1 mg/mL. The samples were washed twice with 3% glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and fixed in glutaraldehyde 0.15 M 2.5% (v/v) at room temperature for 12 h. The dehydrated cells were submitted to sequential baths of ethanol at concentrations of 50%, 70%, 90% and absolute ethanol twice, until the dried at the critical point, then coated with gold in a Metalizer and observed using a Scanning Electron Microscope (Jeol model JSM 5600 Lv) [24].
Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us. I’m researching essential oils for treatment of an ear infection in my little one, and I wondered about “pharmaceutical grade” vs. other types, and your posts here have given me my answer. Your well-written responses to other people above have given me some great insight. I’ll do my due diligence before using anything on my daughter. You’ve done a great job of underscoring the need to know in order to have a safe and desirable outcome. Thank you.
It is. I'm really thankful I began my studies over 10 years ago when most of this was just folk, herbal, and crafter knowledge - much easier to study the topic then sans propaganda. There is an online group of professional practitioners, certified aromatherapists, responsible users and reliable publications on fb currently "300 strong against essential oil ingestion" amassing a library of credible information. They also touch on the NAHA situation if you'd care to learn more, as some members in this group have resigned from NAHA over this compromise of their integrity. Sad, they were always a go-to source for me...but the times, they are a-changin'.
Of course it's amazing to see essential oils go mainstream, but it's the responsibility of the companies creating this mass market to ensure they are harvesting responsibly and sustainably. And unfortunately, this is not the case. Give back programs to support the environment are kind of the same as big oil companies having to pay after major spills. One positive action doesn't undo a destructive one. Maybe this is just a different type of big oil.
A first trademark has been registered (as a word mark) CPTG also by DoTERRA Holdings, LLC, 1145 South 800 East, Ste. 134,  Orem, UT 84057.  Filed on March 31, 2008, published for opposition on June 10, 2008 and official registration granted on May 9, 2009. Under the trademark registration, they show application to the following products: Essential oils; Essential oils for household use; Essential oils for personal use; Lavender oil; Massage oil; Massage oils; Natural essential oils; Aromatherapy oils; Bath oils; Body oils; Cosmetic oils; Cosmetic oils for the epidermis; Essential oils for flavoring beverages; Essential oils for food flavorings; Essential oils for use in manufacturing of gelcaps and other dietary supplements; Essential oils for use in the manufacture of scented products; Oils for cleaning purposes; Oils for toiletry purposes; Skin and body topical lotions, creams and oils for cosmetic use; Food flavorings prepared from essential oils; Oils for perfumes and scents; Peppermint oil; Perfume oils; Tanning oils.
"Therapeutic Grade" or anything along these lines is another common term used to describe "top quality oils". It sounds legit, but it is a marketing term that I am guilty of having used myself in the past when talking about oils. I thought it meant something. There isn't a therapeutic standard for essential oils so the name and any emblem associated with it is virtually meaningless. It's a self-regulated claim like many other healthwashing terms. Cropwatch explains here.
It is also sad that these companies sell for such high prices. OMG when I started I thought now way could I do this. My friends were scaring me by saying I am wasting my money and that they are not safe because they were inexpensive. How can they sleep at night with these prices. I shopped and read reviews and found a few wonderful companies that I can afford. I have many now and can also afford trial and error on different blends.
Tiffany, you raise an interesting point. While we can continue to counter unsafe EO instructions with credible research, that info may be more effective when directed at specific groups. I mean, if companies like YL are going to start targeting everything from Autism to ADHD to mental health issues, and pets too (all ads by their reps I've seen within the past month), then perhaps that's where the credible facts most need to be targeted, too. Also, let's recall that the FDA's rules on the matter state that no dietary supplement, including essential oils, can claim that they treat a disease. So these claims are a clear example of the old sales adage, "it's easier to ask forgiveness than permission".
Thank you so much for this well written and well researched article . I am a British RN. I am also a qualified Aromatherapist, trained very much in the French tradition in UK 22 years ago. The golden rule was and still is : Always dilute and NEVER ingest . Several years ago, on holiday outside of the UK, I came across some YL sales reps. I was shocked by their use of the oils and the fact they were encouraging complete strangers to literally layer undiluted oils on to their skin, sometimes in the sunlight , with no knowledge of their medical histories. I knew that what they were saying and doing was dangerous and misleading ; I told them exactly what I thought but they laughed and said I was out of date !!! They are still getting away with it .
Organic essential oils are not only good for sustainable agricultural practices, they also have the greatest healing properties, says Josh Axe, D.N.M, C.N.S., D.C. founder of DrAxe.com, best-selling author of Eat Dirt, and co-founder of Ancient Nutrition. “Having nothing else added in during the extraction process is the only way to guarantee they are unprocessed and sourced directly from the plant,” says Dr. Axe. Organic is definitely more expensive than conventionally grown, but you’re also getting a superior essential oil.
I know 2 people who are part of the MLM’s, one YL and one DoTERRA. Through their websites I have learned of all this controversy and need to research. You did not answer AJ’s question. How much research is needed to feel qualified to use essential oils effectively and safely and get the most for your money. Should I take a course on them or are there on-line tutorials that are honest?
Hi. Faith. Thanks for sharing about NOW essential oils. In the last two months, I have been learning about EOs and bought several NOW oils at GNC, with the initial intent of using them in more natural cleaning products, getting away from many that are chemical-based and hard to breathe when using. I cannot say that they have had any health benefits for me yet, as I am fortunate to not be prone to a lot of illness, but I have bought NOW grapeseed oil and have used lavender in it on my skin, and have used peppermint for headaches, but I am still learning. I did, however, just purchase the NOW diffuser, two actually, which just arrived this past Saturday afternoon, and I have been enjoying blending oils for scent.
A few can be used on cats, but in general I’d go with the advice of Doing Research On Everything First. If my boys don’t like the smell of something (like my fingers after using an oil and before I can get to washing up…funny story there from when my boys were young) there is no way I’ll us it on them. But there’s also the fact that their systems do react differently.
Quality Standards & Control: Proprietary “Seed to Seal®” production process. Subjected to strict requirements set forth in the CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade® quality protocol. “Source to You” production process. Third-party tested and all test results are fully disclosed on their website. GC/MS Testing, plus their proprietary S.A.A.F.E. Promise™. E.D.E.N.S Guarantee.
This is the first time that I purchase Frankincense and I am glad I did. I want you to know that my knowledge about essential oils is very minimal so I am only writing this review based on my humble experience with it. I use the oil mainly for meditation (grounding and purpose), which I practice twice a day for 30 minutes. Before I set my practice, I take the little bottle and I bring it right to my nostrils. Then, I deeply inhale the aroma and I exhale through my mouth (I repeat this 3 times). If I need to interpret the aroma, I will say that it has a sweet and woodsy feeling to it. It almost reminds me of the smell of pines in a warm summer night...but not quite. I truly enjoy my experience of the Frankincense oil during meditation. Now that I have fallen in love with its charming and mysterious scent, I know I will buy more. By the way, I have to say that the seller's customer care was stellar from the very beginning.
When taken orally, essential oils are broken down by the liver into what are generally referred to phytochemicals, compounds that could affect health. If too many of these phytochemicals accumulate in the liver before the liver can properly process them, they could reach toxic levels. This is a potential side effect of essential oils MLM companies like Young Living and doTerra commonly recommend for oral use, like peppermint.

I learned from reading a FAQ for Beeyoutiful Essential Oils that the reason for smaller essential oils companies labeling their essential oils “not for internal consumption” and are able to price their oils at a much lower price than many of the MLM  companies is because of insurance costs. The only way to get a label on their bottles without the “not for internal consumption” words printed on it, is for the company to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on insurance and training programs/literature. This is the reason for such a high price and such a small bottle. A bottle labeled as such is not necessarily a lower quality essential oil, the company just couldn't or didn't want to purchase the high price tag insurance that goes along with labeling for internal consumption.
I see a lot of comments on here that advise unsafe practices on ingesting essential oils and using them undiluted. Essential oils should never be ingested unless under the care of a doctor or naturopath. In France, only a doctor can prescribe injestion and in Britain they don’t advise it at all. There are many cases of individuals being harmed by this practice. Essential oils are highly concentrated and do not need to be ingested in order to be effective. Also, essential oils should not be used on children, or anyone else, undiluted. Peppermint oil, in particular, has been shown to slow breathing in infants and shouldn’t be used on or diffused around them. I suggest that anyone using essential oils educate themselves on their effectiveness and dangers. There are many great resources, including Dr. Tisserand’s book “Essential Oil Safety”. Education should go beyond that of what a particular company tells you or trains you to do.
Hi Linda. I don’t know about restoring hearing but I have been using oils with good results for tinnitus and hearing that sounds like I’m in a tunnel. It seems my right ear is trying to loose some of it’s high pitch hearing. Whenever I have this happen I use a combo of oils. Helichrysum is one of them. I rub it around the inside of my ear (never drop oils into the canal). Then I apply Frankinsence, Basil, Rosemary, and Melaleuca on the bones in front and back of the ear and down the neck where the eustachian tube is. Sometimes I’ll put a drop on a very small cotten ball and place it in my ear while I sleep. I’m using this now as preventive as my hearing has returned and the tinnitus has stopped. I only do this 2-4 times a month now. But at the first signs of anything happening in my ear I resume doing it twice a day. I’m in my fifties now so I can’t afford to take chances.

Not all essential oils are created equally, nor does more expensive necessarily mean “better.” There are certain brands I will use in a less therapeutic fashion (like for cleaning), because they’re far less expensive than their counterparts. When you see a wide fluctuation in price between, say, lavender essential oils, you can bet that the far less expensive one is likely lower in quality.


There is some concern about pesticide residues in essential oils, particularly those used therapeutically. For this reason, many practitioners of aromatherapy buy organically produced oils. Not only are pesticides present in trace quantities, but also the oils themselves are used in tiny quantities and usually in high dilutions. Where there is a concern about pesticide residues in food essential oils, such as mint or orange oils, the proper criterion is not solely whether the material is organically produced, but whether it meets the government standards based on actual analysis of its pesticide content.[50]
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