I will address one more point – AFNOR is an organization that sets standards (for foods) in France, but it does not certify essential oils, nor does the EC. The EC has safety regulations, and any cometic product sold in an EC member country has to abide by those regulations which include, for example, a maximum of 0.1% for cinnamon bark oil. I wonder if all YL products adhere to EC guidelines? There are (international) ISO standards for many essential oils, and almost all essential oil wholesalers and suppliers the world over conform to the ISO standards. None of these have anything to do with a so-called “therapeutic grade” which only exists in the minds of MLM companies.
Let’s address the issue of ‘health advocates’ giving out prescriptive advice of essential oils. I mentioned that I will sometimes prescribe internal essential oils for short periods of time.  As a qualified health herbalist and naturopath, I have an intricate understanding of human anatomy, physiology, and metabolism. I can look at research and decide on the safety profile of a new medicine before I prescribe it to my patients. Although essential oil health advocates are well-meaning (I truly believe they are) they simply are not qualified to be giving out health advice. I’m actually fine with them recommending certain oils and blends for diffusing, but I’d even be cautious to take advice on topical applications from someone who was not trained in aromatherapy. I’ve seen countless facebook posts of well-meaning advocates recommending everything from the neat (undiluted) use of essential oils on children, essential oil ‘cocktails’ with 2-3 drops of each oil (I’m not kidding). I’ve also heard countless horror stories of rashes, irritations, diarrhea and headaches from use.
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The certification of the management system after DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 proves, that we work with sustainability on quality and efficiency. The ISO 9001:2000 norm contains an obligation for the continuos improvement and a process-oriented approach. The most important objective is the satisfaction of the clients by consequent product management and integrated service.
The notion of using essential oils as a replacement for standard medical therapy is not new. Today’s essential oils are yesterday’s herbal remedies. They’re your grandmother’s swamp root, your great-grandmother’s liver pills and your great-great-grandmother’s snake oil (hey, at least we made it back to oil). And as in those days, somebody’s getting rich selling their wares. Why? Because there will always be folks who claim they work and others who buy into the claim looking for a quick fix. My question for believers in the crowd: how do you know the remedy really did the job? Runny noses get better. Coughs and bellyaches go away. Rashes clear up, skin heals and behavior fluctuates.
Do they promote the unsafe use of essential oils? Some companies, many of the MLM companies included, promote some very unsafe practices, using essential oils. If you want to be a Registered Aromatherapist you have to follow certain safety rules to remain registered, including the use of internal ingestion (unless you are a health care practitioner trained at an appropriate clinical level.), undiluted use, and Raindrop Techniques (Aroma Touch or other similar techniques.). These practices are prohibited by the AIA (Alliance of International Aromatherapists) if you want to remain a registered member.  You can read more about essential oil safety and ingestion.

I will address one more point – AFNOR is an organization that sets standards (for foods) in France, but it does not certify essential oils, nor does the EC. The EC has safety regulations, and any cometic product sold in an EC member country has to abide by those regulations which include, for example, a maximum of 0.1% for cinnamon bark oil. I wonder if all YL products adhere to EC guidelines? There are (international) ISO standards for many essential oils, and almost all essential oil wholesalers and suppliers the world over conform to the ISO standards. None of these have anything to do with a so-called “therapeutic grade” which only exists in the minds of MLM companies.

One teaspoon of most dried herbs is all it takes to promote health and well-being. So if you want to consume the healing power of plants, simply steep the herb in a cup of hot water! You'll have the synergists and buffers that come along with the plant's active ingredients to help your body gently and properly process the active components, all the medicinal power you probably need, and a tasty beverage to enjoy!
After much internet research I found that high doses of magnesium helped. I currently take 1 tablespoon of “Calm” magnesium powder diluted in a cup of warm water every night before bed. Magnesium also helps with sleep. The magnesium has not been a cure all for me. I’ve also been going to an acupuncturist for the past 5 months which has also helped greatly but I still get the night cramps occasionally which is very upsetting. I’ve also found that caffeine and alcohol make matters worse so be careful with consumption of both.
I have been bothered by yeast infections in past yrs(vaginal) knowing that most essential oils have antibacterial properties I did the following; In 1 cup bottled water I put 8 to 10 drops Rosemary essential oil, stirred it up, wet a washcloth with it and bathed the area. I had immeadiate relief from the horrible itching. If it came back do it again..It only took 2 treatments for me. that was a Godsend to me.
Essential oils can be considered, fundamentally, as medication. Although derived from plants and natural resources they are still used as treatment for health ailments. The oil’s high concentration makes them very powerful and potentially dangerous substances if used incorrectly. It is imperative that you do thorough research before using any essential oil, because if used improperly they can cause serious health issues like allergic reactions, rashes, burns and long-term internal damage. The temptation to self-diagnose and self-prescribe can be a great influence in using essential oils, but without professional diagnosis and supervision you run a risk of causing yourself harm. With that in mind here are some very important guidelines to follow:

Organic Farms. These farms practice organic cultivation, yet are not independently monitored. This is usually due to the lack of an agency in the area. Farms in more remote areas are usually unable to purchase the herbicides and fertilizers due to their cost. Personal contact with the farm is required to confirm that their cultivation is organic and clean, producing quality essential oils.


Danika – you keep saying that “just because Young Living says it’s safe” – we’re not only learning that it’s safe from Young Living – MANY representatives for Young Living have taken it upon themselves to read and educate themselves extensively on the use of EO’s aromatically, topically and internally. Just because you believe that EO’s shouldn’t be used internally (due to your method of training) – doesn’t mean is wrong! For centuries EO’s were used aromatically, topically and INTERNALLY without harmful side effects. I do agree that a level of RESPONSIBILITY needs to used – as with any “medicinal product” – that goes without saying – but to literally sit there and accuse DoTerra or Young Living representatives of being un-educated or willingly harming people – you’re being very ignorant, cruel and narrow-minded.
Another French contemporary, Dr. Jean Valnet, used therapeutic-grade essential oils to successfully treat injured soldiers during World War II. He then went on to become a world leader in the development of respected aromatherapy practices. The modern use of essential oils has continued to grow incredibly rapidly as health scientists and medical practitioners continue to research and validate the benefits of therapeutic-grade essential oil.

Lori, I am relatively new to the essential oils world, but I do remember reading somewhere (check planttherapy.com or edensgarden.com) that essential oils are the pure life essence of the plants from which they are derived. An essential fragrance is often obtained with solvent or alcohol distillation which make the essential fragrance a better choice for making fragrances as they are usually less expensive.
My neighbor recommended DoTerra to me and had her sales representative friend present me with their products. It looked, sounded, and smelled great! I filled the paperwork out and a few hours later she called me because I had failed to provide my ss# (which I had intentionally left blank.) I never followed up with her or looked into it further, but it caught me off guard! Is this normal or standard?
First, their bottles didn’t come with the little plastic dripper caps that cover the mouth of the bottle (aka. orifice reducer), they just had a simple screw cap. Without the orifice reducers you either have to pour the oil out and make a mess or dip an eye dropper into the oil which can potentially contaminate the product if you’re not careful. Plus if oil gets into the little rubber bulb of the eye dropper it can get stuck in there and go bad, further contaminating the oil.

Hi, I was wondering if anybody knows where I can get Korres organic essential oils. I bought a lavender and a geranium last year on vacation in Greece but it seems that they’re only sold there. I can’t find them anywhere on the internet which seems really odd. The quality was amazing and I really want to try the others and restock on the lavender and geranium. Please help!
It is important to note that Lavender has been prized for perfumery, cosmetics and natural medicine for thousands of years in many nations. Lavender was one of the fragrant herbs used to make the anointing oil mentioned in the Bible. However, this would have been Lavandula stoechas, not Lavandula angustifolia. The Romans used Lavender in perfumes, cosmetics and herbal remedies. In fact, the word Lavender comes from the Latin “lavare”, meaning “to clean”. However, the Romans would more likely have been using Lavandula latifolia than Lavandula angustifolia.  Lavender was also prized for its scent as well as for its medicinal properties in ancient Persia, but the Persians had Lavandula coronopifolia, not Lavandula angustifolia. When Tutankhamen’s tomb was opened, urns were found which were believed to contain cosmetics scented with Lavender. Lavender was indeed used in ancient Egypt and across northern Africa, but it would more likely have been Lavandula multifida than Lavandula angustifolia. Egyptian Lavender was good enough for the personal care products the Pharoah would be using for all eternity…how inferior to Lavandula angustifolia could it possibly be? If one was to research the use of Lavender throughout the ages, I am confident that most of the information found would refer to Lavandula species other than Lavandula angustifolia.
#1- Therapeutic Grade is just a selling gimmick. If EO’s are pure, they are equal to any other. There are only a few distillery’s so many of the EO’s come from the same distillery then sold under several names. You should always buy from a company that is willing to give you the GC/MS reports regarding the Lot your EO bottle is from. That tells the constituents of the EO and would indicate if adulterated in any way.
Janice, I hope we are not at odds. For the record, whenever people ask me about either Do Terra or Young Living, I tell them that they are very good quality oils, which they are. I mean it when I say I’m glad you are happy with your supplier. And don’t take this as an attack on you – it isn’t – but I don’t subscribe to the MLM business model for aromatherapy. Maybe I am generalizing too much, but what I see is some problematic bending of facts (see above discussion) in order to sell product. And some flirtation with the boundaries of safety that make me uncomfortable. When selling product is your motivation, this is perhaps not surprising. As for me, I do not receive a paycheck from Tisserand Aromatherapy, and almost never mention the company.
A pure, natural essential oil is an oil that is extracted from one species of plant from one specific geographical area.  The aroma profile for these oils will vary slightly from season to season and from geographical location to geographical location.  For example the lavender essential oil we sell at Moon Haven is a high altitude lavender grown and distilled in the mountains of France and we feel this is the best quality oil with the most appropriate and consistent scent profile of the plant Lavendula angustifolia.
Many state legislatures are, as we speak, considering (or have already passed laws) criminalizing the previously legal parental right of refusing vaccinations on the basis of religious or philosophical beliefs. That is happening right now in Wisconsin’s Republican-dominated legislature, Minnesota’s split GOP/DFL legislature, and California’s Democratic Party-dominated legislature – where it is already signed into law by Democrat Jerry Brown. These poorly informed – and heavily bribed politicians don’t realize that their legislative efforts will be blindly forcing unsuspecting patients to submit to every new blockbuster vaccine that successfully emerges from the pipeline. Talk about making decisions on the basis of partial information or propaganda from sociopathic corporate entities! Attention, Senators Al Franken, Amy Klobuchar and other assorted legislators. Are you listening to the real science or to the corrupted, pseudoscience of Big Pharma?
Meanwhile, peddlers are doing nothing and selling these oils all over the place and destroying this craft you and I hold so dearly. It's maddening, saddening, and I hope soon all of the hard work guardians of the profession are doing to get aromatherapy recognized as legitimate will be recognized so we can put an end to this very serious and glaring issue. People out there buy their pitch-hook, line and sinker, because they see results for a couple of weeks.
Plant Therapy’s labels are a bit scarce in their information. They display the proper Latin names and the USDA Organic logo, but that’s it. Instead of including the country of origin and other important notes — which can be found on the website — they have a long description of what the oils could be used for and how to use it, followed by an FDA disclaimer so they won’t get in trouble.

I too did extensive research when I began learning about oils, and through my research found that Young Living puts the greatest amount of care and research into their oils. They have teams of doctors and veterinarians that advise on the oils. Out of the millions that use YL oils, I find that your research has produced nothing that should bring about great concern about how their oils are used. You need to be careful with everything that you do. Each OTC drug has had a number of people complain about side effects, etc. Have you bashed each and every one of them? You need to not play doctor. You can do research, but people need to be responsible for their own health. I am thankful for essential oils and we use them undiluted (not all, but some) on our skin and we use them internally. If you will read labels of items you purchase, you will find that many have essential oils in them and you are drinking it or eating it. Your research is incomplete and biased. I'm sorry for you and each reader who decides not to continue their own research. You are missing out on a good thing. God put these oils here and they have been used for 1000s of years safely. (All articles are not written by YL - very misleading title. People should be hesitant in trusting you.)
There are many popular, quality essential oils, including those that are Certified USDA Organic, therapeutic grade and 100% pure—with no fillers, bases or additives. For example, being Certified USDA Organic is important for some people because the organic certification can be traced back clear to the seed and plant. Every handler of the product must be certified as well. Additionally, no prohibited pesticides or other toxins are used for Certified USDA Organic products.
I want to thank you for writing this piece. As a newbie to oils, I appreciate the time, effort, and education. While for some time, I knew there were things to be gained from EOs, the MLM companies pushing them just didn’t sit right with me. They were expensive and only get cheaper once you become a distributor. Sounds kind of like a pyramid scheme to me.

It is important that people research the oils they are using – as not all EO’s are created equally and MANY on the market can be harmful when used improperly. Industry standards are very lax and an EO is only required to have a minimum of 2% essential oil in the bottle to be classified as pure – the rest can be synthetics or fillers. I chose Young Living Essential Oils because I know – without a doubt that from the minute the seed is planted to the minute it goes into the bottle – proper care and precision has been taken to ensure only the highest quality oil on the market. Young Living is the ONLY company in the world who has taken it one step further by having our own farms, doing our own harvesting, cultivating, distilling, testing and bottling of our products as well.

The products that ZEVA Essential Oils offers are 100% ISO certified essential oils derived from plant sources, and manufactured to contain active phytochemicals from plants without fillers or chemicals. ZEVA only uses oils certified by the Medicinal Oil Association, and we source our plants from quality suppliers throughout the world. However, because of the differences in organic certification from country to country, and even from one state to another in the U.S., it is not possible to acquire raw materials that are all certified organic. We do check our plant supplies for chemical residues in the form of solvents, herbicides, pesticides, and extenders so we can offer products that are as pure as possible, often exceeding the standards for certified organic products.
If you dilute an essential oil with a carrier oil to do the “patch test” to see if you are sensitive to the essential oil, and you get a reaction, you could be reacting to the carrier oil. Whatever essential oils you use, you should follow the information that comes with it. If it doesn’t come with any guidelines on the label, I would not use it at all. Some are safe to ingest, some are not. Some need to be diluted, some do not (except on babies and small children, when you should dilute).
I am trying to write an essay for a public health post grad course, the role of the public health worker.. I won’t bore you with the details… I’m trying to tentatively suggest that education is a major role….non antibiotic therapies for infectious disease, for example tea tree in the treatment of staphlococcal…. can you suggest any reading/authors/doctors I can explore?

The old adage, “you get what you pay for” is generally quite true when it comes to essential oils. Producing and distributing high quality essential oils is a time consuming and expensive process. If you find an essential oil at a price significantly lower than most major brands, you’re not getting a good deal, you’re probably getting a fake product.
Essential oils can be altered to achieve standardization (for example, a certain chemical that was found to be at a lower concentration in the whole oil in a particular year can be added to make it the same percentage as last year's batch). The problem with standardized essential oils is that they are no longer natural, genuine, and authentic. This variability in essential oils by time, place and conditions is a big challenge to conducting valid research. Currently the International Standards Organization sets standards for each essential oil that include a range of acceptable concentrations for its major chemical constituents.

The use of essential oils during pregnancy is a controversial topic and one that is yet to be fully understood. The main concern during pregnancy appears to be the risk of essential oil constituents crossing over into the placenta. According to Tisserand and Balacs, crossing the placenta does not necessarily mean that there is a risk of toxicity to the fetus; this will depend on the toxicity and the plasma concentration of the compound.9 It is probable that essential oil metabolites cross the placenta due to the intimate (but not direct) contact between maternal and embryonic or fetal blood.10


Hi there! I love your blog! I’m trying to find some information about using essential oils in homemade remineralizing toothpaste. My two year old uses this toothpaste and I’ve been adding the OraWellness Brushing Blend (a mix of several EOs in a base of sweet almond oil) to it. I was interested in also adding orange oil for flavor so I tried googling its safety for children. There’s so much conflicting advice about ingesting EOs and he does swallow the toothpaste almost every time. :/ Thoughts
It is important to remember where essential oils come from whenever you purchase a bottle. It takes 250 pounds of rose blossoms to produce one (1) ounce (30ml) of rose oil, which explains the very high cost of pure rose otto or rose absolute (Encyclopedia Brittanica, 2015.) Other oils are easier to produce, but every oil requires a large amount of plant matter to produce a small amount of oil. This means that good quality essential oils will never be cheap. This does not mean that more expensive oils will always be better than less expensive ones, but the old adage, “if it seems too good to be true, it probably is,” definitely applies here. Do not be fooled by discount retailers, big box stores, state fair or bazaar vendors, and others who offer essential oils at very low prices or charge the same price for all of their oils. The comforting thought when investing in true, pure essential oils is that since the oils are so highly concentrated and so little is required for most applications, even an expensive oil like rose otto can end up being cost effective in the long run.
Most common essential oils such as lavender, peppermint, tea tree oil, patchouli, and eucalyptus are distilled. Raw plant material, consisting of the flowers, leaves, wood, bark, roots, seeds, or peel, is put into an alembic (distillation apparatus) over water. As the water is heated, the steam passes through the plant material, vaporizing the volatile compounds. The vapors flow through a coil, where they condense back to liquid, which is then collected in the receiving vessel.
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