While I hope very much that the essential oils that they sell are of high quality, the fact that they are creating this misleading marketing scheme does not give me high hopes for their credibility as a company.  As a general rule of thumb, I would think twice before sourcing from a company that claims their essential oils are "certified therapeutic grade."  They are either completely naive and pretending to have a certification that doesn't exist, or they are not naive and are pretending to have a certification that does not exist.  Either way, not promising.  
To answer your question I am going to make a suggestion – buy an oil from the grocery or drug store that your daughter in law has in stock from YL, arrange a time to go over to her home and smell the 2 bottles. As silly as it sounds you will be able to tell a difference just in the smell. And yes, you get what you pay for. Many grocery and drug store brands are 2nd, 3rd, even 5th and 6th distillations of the product, are often diluted with carrier, and are not as pure as YL or DoTerra. Both of those companies use the 1st distillation which is the most pure. As for carrier oils you can use coconut, grape seed, sweet almond, jojoba, olive, or even boring old vegetable oil.
I tested grapefruit oil from Eden’s Garden, tea tree oil from Tea Tree Therapy, and vetiver oil from Nature’s Kiss brand (I think the tea tree oil I bought in a natural food store and the other brands from Amazon?), all on the same strip of yellow construction paper. After 20 minutes, there is a huge oily spot from the Nature’s Kiss oil (and looking at the label, I can see now it is embarrassingly low quality production as it looks sort of cheaply homemade- don’t recommend ever buying that brand if you see it). The Tea Tree Therapy spot is smaller and a little lighter, but still definitely an oily stain. The smallest, lightest one is the Eden’s Garden grapefruit spot, which I’m sort of glad about considering most of my oils are that brand, but I can still definitely see where it was dropped. I can’t really imagine an oil not leaving any spot behind at all, but if I ever find one that does, I would be very impressed.
Okay, I have recently purchased YL oils. Are the oils themselves a good quality to use as long as you use them properly? I want them to purify the air, help with stuffy noses for the kids, homemade bug spray, things like that. I guess I'm asking, if I do not ingest and I dilute the oils, are they a good quality? I also use Aura Cacia as I can easily find it in my grocery store. Thanks so much for this article. I am learning a lot! :)
What nutrients? What cells? Essential oils do not contain nutrients – they contain no vitamins, minerals, proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, or any other type of nutrient. I have never seen any research that pertains to essential oils delivering nutrients to cells. Essential oil constituents have been used to enhance percutaneous absorption of pharmaceuticals, delivering them via the skin into the blood. But this pertains neither to nutrients nor cells. So the statement makes no sense.
Fragrance oils often have additives or are entirely made of synthetic chemicals intended to mimic natural scents and extend the lifespan of the scent vastly. While a fragrance oil may be used in a perfume to help the scent last all day, or used in a candle to scent a whole room, essential oils are extremely volatile, meaning they evaporate quickly. So using only essential oils in perfumes, candles, soaps, and sprays most often results in scents that don't linger very long. Because of this, perfumes and other scented items often use natural and/or chemical additives to enhance and extend their tenacity, or scent life, thus making them fragrance oils. They are then labeled as such.

For the last 15-20 years, essential oil therapy’s demand for clean, high quality oils has been stimulated by scientific analysis and research. The community has made some impact on the production and distribution practices of the worldwide essential oil industry. Everyone using essential oils in therapies as integrative medicine are creating a niche market for a new generation of essential oils. Analysis by and for therapists will continue to have positive influence on essential oil purity, quality, discovery and treatment.

Oral biofilm acquires new microbial species in each stage of its development, including Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus sanguis, S. mutans, S. mitis and S. sobrinus, which due their pathogenicity could damage the enamel and gum tissue [3]. Diseases appear in this micro-environment when there is a lack of equilibrium in the ecosystem of the bacterial biofilm formed [4], and thus the mechanical removal of the biofilm is an important factor to prevention of caries and periodontal diseases. Since biofilm is an organized association, able to adhere to teeth and causing pathological alterations in oral cavity, its disaggregation is indicated as soon as possible [5]. Considering the importance of this dissociation, it is important to associate both chemical and mechanical procedures in order to control its formation [6].
This is what I think has happened. doTERRA executives were having a meeting. Someone says “People are loving these oils but they probably only go through 5-6 drops a day tops! That means a bottle of oil will last them 2 months. How can we get them to use more?” Then another sales executive says… “I know – why don’t we get them to start ingesting them? Putting drops into the water. Including them in food. That way we’ll sell way more product!!”. “Great idea! I’ll get the marketing plan on the way”.
Thank you all for your input and time. I too have been confused, frustrated, skeptical, and at times alarmed. What YL consultants don’t realize when they spout comments about micro and chemical biology, are the consequences that come with doing or not doing what they recommend. This is the grey area that is dangerous and the absolute reason and need for the FDA in the pharmaceutical industry. I am in the marketing industry, so I full well understand the MLM model or any other business model. I don’t blame them, for there is no difference between that and what Homeland does vs. Piggly Wiggly or Macy’s vs. JC Penney, or Walmart vs. Kmart… Thanks for helping me understand the real language and science involved.
My extensive collection of essential oils contains many produced from wood, bark and/or heartwood, including Amyris, Cade (Prickly Juniper), Buddha Wood, Balsam gurjun, Peru Balsam, Atlas Cedarwood, Himalayan Cedarwood, Texas Cedarwood, Virginia Cedarwood, Cinnamon  Bark, Blue Cypress, Emerald Cypress, Balsam Fir, Guaiacwood, Ocean (Maritime) Pine, Ravensara aromatica, Ravintsara, Rosewood, Indian Sandalwood, Australian Sandalwood, Fijian Sandalwood, and Zanthoxylum.
There is no difference between wintergreen oil toxicity and methyl salicylate toxicity. Methyl salicylate is one of the ingredients in Listerine, so many people use it daily in a mouthwash, and very small amounts may be ingested. As always, toxicity is in relation to dose. I would suggest that wintergreen oil is not one that should be taken orally as a medicine, unless under the supervision of a doctor or herbalist. There have been many fatalities from (accidental) overdose, and there are a number of toxicity issues – it’s fetotoxic, there are several reasons why it could be problematic in children, it’s extremely blood-thinning, and should be avoided by people with GERD. So it’s not just a question of how much is toxic – it’s also about individual sensitivity. It should absolutely never be taken during pregnancy. Like all salicylates, it causes fetal malformations. Even externally, it can cause problems. I believe it has now been taken out of Tiger Balm because so many people in Asia were experiencing blood-thinning problems (internal bruising in people on blood-thinning drugs).
My neighbor recommended DoTerra to me and had her sales representative friend present me with their products. It looked, sounded, and smelled great! I filled the paperwork out and a few hours later she called me because I had failed to provide my ss# (which I had intentionally left blank.) I never followed up with her or looked into it further, but it caught me off guard! Is this normal or standard?
This is what I think has happened. doTERRA executives were having a meeting. Someone says “People are loving these oils but they probably only go through 5-6 drops a day tops! That means a bottle of oil will last them 2 months. How can we get them to use more?” Then another sales executive says… “I know – why don’t we get them to start ingesting them? Putting drops into the water. Including them in food. That way we’ll sell way more product!!”. “Great idea! I’ll get the marketing plan on the way”.
I am confused on your list of EOs to avoid while nursing or pregnant. Many of these oils I have never heard being issues. I use Lemon oil regularly and ginger as well, as a nursing mother. Could you perhaps list effects of each oil for breastfeeding mothers ? I know peppermint reduces production but confused on most of the others…. you listed ” Aniseed, cedarwood, chamomile, cinnamon, clary sage, clove, ginger, jasmine, lemon, nutmeg, rosemary, sage” I use several on this list currently and was about to put in a YL order for clary sage
Based in Sedona, Arizona, Stillpoint Aromatics was the passionate creation of Joy Musacchio and Cynthia Brownley, two highly educated women who have been working with essential oils since 1990. In seeking the world’s best sources these very resourceful women have cultivated first-name-basis, personal relationships with farmers and distillers around the planet.
Analysis of the answer: A triple-layered confusing response that also does not answer the question asked. Let's break this down into its separate parts. First, it would make more sense to simply learn about the safety of ingesting peppermint oil before eating peppermint oil, let alone instruct others to do the same. Next, drugging children has nothing to do with the question at hand. That's fear mongering - associating a completely unrelated and disproportionately devastating idea to disrupt logical, rational thinking. Finally, nature also provides nightshade, oleander, daffodil bulbs and jasmine berries, and if you're ready to eat a big salad of all that, you should at least take a basic botany class.
“Young Living owns the 4 largest distillers, partners with the next 2 largest, distills on 5 continents, farms much of their own production, is the first company to use oils Intra-muscularly, the first company to use oils intra-venously, the first company to use oils as dietary supplements, is the only company that is AFNOR, EC and ISO certified Therapeutic Grade, their oils never expire, are used topically neat even on day old infants etc…”

“This study is a re-analysis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data pertaining to the relationship of autism incidence and the age at which children got their first measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Statistically significant relationships were observed when African-American males were considered separately while looking at those individuals who were vaccinated prior to and after a 36-month age cut-off. CDC officials observed very similar relationships as early as November 2001, but failed to report them in their final publication. In addition, a relationship is seen when specifically considering children who received a diagnosis of autism without mental retardation. Although this was reported in the original 2004 paper, it was not discussed, nor was any follow-up study conducted. Preliminary results also suggest the possibility of a synergism between thimerosal exposure and MMR timing leading to a greater risk of autism.”


Hello Ellen,I just started using YL and I started puttimg straight frankencense on a skin cancer that was needing cut out.Ive allready had one taken out the size of my thumbnail.The new spot is now gone but im still putting oil on til i feels safe.My freinds totally acned out face is now totally clear.Yes its costly,but you have the alternative to be a salesman(like marykay etc).+ work from home.As far as their license?have no clue though I dont see how a 9 country operation could be so careless .I love love their products,but i still find great natural products at cheaper cost.All i know is I found something that really works and still cheaper than a doctor for now.
Most essential oils are distilled and standardized (adulterated) for use in other industries, so those carefully sourcing and selling essential oils intended for aromatherapy and therapeutic applications understandably do want a way to convey the suitability, purity and quality of their oils for therapeutic uses. Soil conditions, seed quality, climate, altitude, growing conditions, harvesting, the care during distillation, bottling and storage can all play a part in the resulting quality of an essential oils. These are all factors that conscientious suppliers pay close attention to. Using these two-word terms seemed to be a concise way for suppliers to designate that their oils were suitable for use by those seeking oils for use in holistic aromatherapy.
This post is a definite BOOKMARK for me…I love all the info. My favorite essential oil to put in my burner is sweet orange – it just makes me so HAPPY! I read your response above about YLEO. I received a package of them as a gift a few years ago from a friend. I love them and have them in my studio all the time, but honestly I would never pay those prices. MLM completely scares me off of them too…just sharing my agreement with you 🙂
I have never used either YL or DoTerra and am not affiliated with either company but I have some very serious concerns about the claims made by YL and their representatives, as well as their owner/founder and his moral standing. There are disagreements within the aromatherapy industry as to how oils can and should be used but I know several QUALIFIED aromatherapists and they all advise that NOT all oils should be taken internally or applied undiluted directly to the skin.
Any essential oil business that cares about selling only pure essential oils will have their oils tested with at least two tests, usually run simultaneously, the gas chromatography and mass spectrometry tests, or GC/MS.  Responsible essential oil vendors will run these tests on every batch of oil they receive from a distiller. Many of these vendors provide batch-specific GC/MS reports on their websites, and some others will provide them on request, sometimes for a nominal fee. Some high quality essential oil vendors do not provide these reports, but those that do are prefered by trained aromatherapists.
Continuing: Environmental factors, like mold or dust, can trigger sinus infections. It's also a possibility, however small, that maybe the trigger of your sinus infection was removed from your home. Or another reason. We kicked sinus troubles here with apple cider vinegar in water. Holistic medicine utilizes a wide array of natural products, including fruits and vegetables, grains, vinegars, fatty oils like olive and coconut, decoctions, poultices, and infusions like herbal teas that can be both gentle and effective - essential oils are just a small, potent part of supporting your well-being naturally, and pose the risk of some side effects some of your other options here don't. They are not the only cure.
Bergamot Essential Oil has a fresh and delightful citrus aroma with strong citrus notes and a hint of the exotic, and has been made popular by Earl Grey Tea. This refreshing essential oil is suited for aromatherapy and induces a more relaxed and happy feeling, while reducing oiliness of the skin. Widely used in the perfume industry, it is also used in cleansers and toners.
Cumin oil, which is safe to use in your food, can cause blisters if you put it on your skin.  Citrus oils that are safe in your food may be bad for your skin, especially if you go out into the sun. And the opposite is true, too. Eucalyptus or sage oil may soothe you if you rub it on your skin or breathe it in. But swallowing them could can cause a serious complication, like a seizure.
All companies and marketing aside, how do YOU most effectively use essential oils and do you have a resource to recommend that gives good guidelines to the beginner (i.e. which oils can be used topically and internally, and recommended dilutions, etc.) I have heard of a big reference book called The Complete Book of Essential Oils to be good–are you familiar with this title?
For example, Peppermint Essential Oil is used primarily as a flavoring for candies (i.e. Candy Canes), chewing gum and ice creams. It is often referred to on food ingredient labels as Oil of Peppermint or simply as Peppermint Oil. Because large food/candy manufacturers must produce a consistently flavored product, the intensity, aroma and overall flavor of the peppermint oil they use must remain consistent between each lot of oil that they purchase. Peppermint Oil manufacturers/distributors, therefore typically standardize the essential oils that they sell by establishing a blueprint of the percentage that each important constituent should reach within each essential oil. They then test the oil and then adjust the oil by adding or removing constituents until the resulting oil meets the ideal percentage.
Think about this for a moment – the aromatherapy industry is not the only user of essential oils. In fact, aromatherapy accounts for a very small percentage. The majority of essential oils produced end up in food flavouring, pharmaceutical, perfumery and personal care and these essential oils are usually modified to meet the standards required for each of these industries.
There is a big difference between “Certified Organic” and “organic”. To be certified there are regulations, inspections, GMP, ISO 9000 and more. Once the seal is broken on a drum by anyone not certified in the chain of custody, the oil then becomes “organic” and no longer can the term “certified” be used. In another words, if the grower releases the material as “Certified Organic” the distiller, the bottler, the manufacturer, etc who takes possession of the material after that all must be “certified” as well or the chain of custody is broken. Most essential oil companies at this time are not certified by the USDA and therefore are falsely claiming they are selling “Certified Organic” materials when in fact they are breaking the chain of custody requirements. Therapists are now paying a premium for organic oils with the implied assurance the oil they are buying is pure and high quality. Without analytical data to back up the “pure” claim on the label, “organic” may become trivialized like “natural” has become.
The notion of using essential oils as a replacement for standard medical therapy is not new. Today’s essential oils are yesterday’s herbal remedies. They’re your grandmother’s swamp root, your great-grandmother’s liver pills and your great-great-grandmother’s snake oil (hey, at least we made it back to oil). And as in those days, somebody’s getting rich selling their wares. Why? Because there will always be folks who claim they work and others who buy into the claim looking for a quick fix. My question for believers in the crowd: how do you know the remedy really did the job? Runny noses get better. Coughs and bellyaches go away. Rashes clear up, skin heals and behavior fluctuates.
The following oral pathogens were studied: Candida albicans CBS 562 from “Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures” and bacteria Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556, Streptococcus mitis ATCC 903, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586 from American Type Culture Collection. The microorganisms were stored at −70°C in Sabouraud Dextrose Broth (SDB, Merck® - C. albicans) and Mueller-Hinton Broth (Difco® - bacteria) with 15% glycerol. It was considered the oxygen exigencies of each microorganism (C. albicans - aerobiosis, S. mitis and S. sanguis microaerophilie and F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis anaerobiosis) to choose bacteria growth conditions.
I have bought dozens of essential oils from Piping Rock. Their prices are simply the best, especially considering the free shipping and “Crazy Deals” they offer and change almost daily. You can get 15 ml of 100% neroli oil for about $15, and it’s lovely! They also have a 15 ml bottle of 100% West Indian sandalwood for $39.95, and it smells GREAT. A 15 ml bottle of 100% pure cistus oil is about $13 or $14. It can’t be beat! Many of the normally cheaper oils (peppermint, orange, cedarwood, tangerine, tea tree, pine etc.) are wonderfully priced too -almost a steal. Their rose, jasmine and tuberose blends did not disappoint scent-wise (they weren’t too weak at all). Their oils come in glass bottles with stoppers and pretty labels. I was scared at first because of how cheap their prices are, but I’m glad I took the chance. On top of the great products, they ship SUPER FAST, package well, and my orders are always complete and correct. So happy with this company. Lastly, by signing up with the http://www.mrrebates.com website (it’s free), and accessing piping rock from there, you will get a %10 discount on your purchase, which you eventually receive as a refund in cash that you can have added to your PayPal account. I’ve earned over $50 in refunds! I’ve seen this % go up and down by a little from time to time, but the average is 10% (which it is as of today, 5/8/14). Maybe wait for a “free shipping day” and try some of the cheaper oils to test the waters first. Even when you have to pay for shipping (for orders under $40), the shipping is a flat $3.95 rate!
Finally learned that mag isn’t well absorbed in the gut and can have unwanted side effects if you take enough to help the deficiency, but that it’s very well absorbed through the skin. Epsom salts baths help some people, but we only have a shower. Besides, magnesium *chloride* (ES is mag sulfate) is a much better type of magnesium and has quicker effects on the deficiency. Absorption through the skin doesn’t have the same side effects as taking it into the gut.
Thank you for sharing your knowledge! I am 36 weeks pregnant and came down with a nasty cough. I couldn’t take any medicine, but yet couldn’t sleep. I used eucalyptus oil on my neck and chest to clear up my cough. I read that eucalyptus oil is not advised for pregnant women to use, however, I could not find any reasons why. Do you happen to know the risks that eucalyptus oil might have on the unborn baby? I have since stopped using the oil, but definitely used it a few times. (I will be calling my doctor, but was curious about your input.) Thank you so much!

Couldn't of arrived at a better time. I fell ill with the flu the day after I received them, researched appropriate oils that help with boosting immune system an help sickness etc. Used certain ones in the diffuser and my bath and even with a carrier oil (coconut oil) on my skin and my symptoms lessened. I noticed this because the one day I didn't use the oils or diffuser my symptoms became horrendous as the day went on and I was bedridden. Again the following day I went back to using oils and the flu symptoms eased and cleared within two days. Absolute god send. Love them especially frankincense that's my fave. Thank you.
I’m pleased to hear that you are happy with your supplier. Personally, I prefer certified organic oils, and I don’t look to essential oil purveyors for information about aromatherapy. We already have a problem with conventional health care being controlled by pharmaceutical companies, and going down the same road with essential oils doesn’t feel right to me.
Yes, many companies do GC/MS testing and infrared. The real test is, what do they compare the results to and what is that company’s standard for what a good oil is? If their standard is high, then they may reject oils which are below that standard. If their standard is not so high, then they will accept and sell more oils, even ones that have been rejected by a company with higher standards.
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Online research into MLM claims on essential oils is littered with hundreds of personal accounts by representatives and seemingly unaffiliated users of MLM essential oils that all closely resemble each other. These stories first begin by naming an ailment the user had been suffering from. Then they briefly describe all the different methods and products they've used to try to find relief, including other company's essential oils. Finally they mention how they discovered their MLM's essential oils, and now they have relief. The conclusion praises the MLM company and its product.
Of course it's amazing to see essential oils go mainstream, but it's the responsibility of the companies creating this mass market to ensure they are harvesting responsibly and sustainably. And unfortunately, this is not the case. Give back programs to support the environment are kind of the same as big oil companies having to pay after major spills. One positive action doesn't undo a destructive one. Maybe this is just a different type of big oil.
The potential danger of an essential oil is sometimes relative to its level or grade of purity, and sometimes related to the toxicity of specific chemical components of the oil. Many essential oils are designed exclusively for their aroma-therapeutic quality; these essential oils generally should not be applied directly to the skin in their undiluted or "neat" form. Some can cause severe irritation, provoke an allergic reaction and, over time, prove hepatotoxic.
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