I have heard not to use essential oil peppermint around certain ages. That it can interfere with specific ages and their breathing. So if I made an Essential Oil peppermint lotion would I not be able to wear it outside the home incase I came into contact with a person who shouldn’t be exposed to peppermint essential oil OR is this just meant not to diffuse around a child under a certain age. I was on a website that was given the ages of people who shouldn’t be exposed to specific essential oils. I believe peppermint essential oil was one. Others were pointed out as well. So is it ok to wear the diluted essential oil on your skin if that specific essential oil is not recommended for little children? Or are they speaking of diffusing only?

Mountain Rose Herbs also holds quite a few certifications and awards pertaining to their product sourcing, including non-GMO project certification, and the 2013 Best Green Business’s To Work For In Oregon. Overall, this company is making quite a few awesome commitments to better, green business practices and if you like this ideology, this is your company to support.


Somebody asked about the relationship between doTERRA and Young Living, since their claims regarding their respective oils are so similar. Funny thing about that. There was originally only one company – I think Young Living, although I am not sure – but those folks got in a squabble among themselves and a group broke off and formed doTERRA. Hence, the nearly identical hype.
There is a lot of misinformation on the web, in books and by word of mouth, about the use of essential oils. No matter the brand that you choose to go with, using essential oils safely is the most important factor. ALL essential oils (no matter their brand) can be dangerous if not used with caution and care. To learn more about how to SAFELY use essential oils you can read my latest post: Introduction to Essential Oil Safety

One of my biggest frustrations of late has been a MLM company, I won’t name names and start a whole “thing”, but they state that they have a patent on “certified therapeutic grade”. In actuality, if you research the information, the only thing that is patented, is the logo that states “certified therapeutic grade”. It has nothing to do with the actual product, just the advertising.


We’re having a problem at our apartment that we fear may be bedbugs, and I’m following a recipe to make a topical treatment that is supposed to protect me from being bitten–since I’m one of those unlucky 30% who are sensitive to their bites–while we undergo whatever steps necessary to rid the premises of the pests. It calls for six drops each of lemongrass oil and tea tree oil, and 10 each of lavender and thyme, in a quarter cup of almond oil. I’m supposed to apply it before bed, but I’m wondering how safe it is to apply on, say, the face, since the insects target any exposed skin, and that’s one of the few areas I can’t really cover. Any knowledge on the matter would be appreciated.
DoTerra states that it is aiming to be “a leader in the essential oil industry . . . looking forward to working with other responsible industry leaders and standard setting bodies to establish high standards for products labeled as pure essential oils.” There are long established entities working towards publishing accurate monographs and identifying compositional standards that would apply to essential oils. What DoTerra should be more concerned with are recommendations of “direct” (which is presumed to be undiluted) skin application and “internal” use of essential oils that might not have G.R.A.S. designation. If they were spending more time on safe usage and less on misleading certification standards, they would stand a better chance of working with “responsible” industry leaders.
In a Chinese study, an ointment containing 5% tea tree oil was used by patients whose eyelash follicles were infested with “eyelash mites” (Demodex folliculorum). The ointment was applied to the lid margins with eyes closed, daily for 4 weeks after washing the face, and resulted in considerably less itching and fewer mites. Two of the 24 patients experienced slight irritation from the ointment. The 5% concentration was arrived at after preliminary testing using various dilutions on rabbit eyes (Gao et al 2012).
A genuine therapeutic grade standard for essential oils is a great idea, it just doesn’t exist at this point in time. What does exist is the ISO standard, for many essential oils – http://www.iso.org/iso/home.html – and for organic certification, an organization called IFOAM – http://www.ifoam.org – the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements, which was formed in 1972. Certified organic essential oils have been available since the 1980s. Maybe not in your local health store, but they were being produced.
The reason why is that the ISO standard was developed as a very narrow qualification test for the fragrance industry, keeping "undesirable" but naturally occurring compounds such as camphor low because they're not ideal in ingredients used specifically for formulating expensive perfumes, where purer scent notes are more useful than more complex ones. However, the original cultivars of lavender actually had considerably more camphor - and other complex components - than the two cultivars that ISO recommends for perfume industry use. For example, the presence of more naturally occurring camphor, 1,8-cineole, and/or boreal is expected in a blend of the four major cultivars, but not in the two cultivars preferred by perfumers and reflected in the ISO standard prepared for that industry. Perhaps these very compounds in higher amounts may be at least partially responsible for the historical uses and good reputation of lavender oil.
I read your article hoping to get outside information about diluting and ingesting certain EO's but it seemed your main objective was to discredit Young Living Sales people when there are many other companies selling EO's and countless people using and wanting information about how to improve their health and starving for sound advice in alternatives to western medicine.
Lortscher says that the purity of different EO’s can vary widely, based on the degree of concentration and where they’re sourced from. "On top of that, the quality of your oils can be affected by adulteration (the purposeful addition of foreign substances), unintentional contamination, inadequate production, or improper storage conditions," he says. "If you keep an essential oil exposed to bright sunlight or oxygen, the composition of the oil can change. It’s best to store them in a cool, dark place."
Analysis of the answer: Cleverly pre-scripted rebuttal meant to both reassure you in Young Living's credibility and distract you from the actual issues that concerned you in the first place and prompted you to ask the question, like sales ethics and safety practices. Notice how it never directly discusses if their company really is a reputable company. It also uses keywords, phrases, and ideas that are already familiar to you (like drug companies vs. natural remedies, and money hungry pharmaceutical companies) to overcome your objections. Yes you believe in natural remedies, and yes you believe that "big pharma" is greedy, but what about your concerns regarding this company and this product? Always keep the question you want answered in mind—maybe even write it down.
The Cedarwood Essential Oil is widely used in commercial soaps, cosmetics, perfumes, and especially in men's colognes. Atlas Cederwood is the most popular variety and has a woody, sweet, scent that is very sharp. The Cedarwood (Chinese) Essential Oil generally has a lower cedrol content than the Atlas, hence it is used more for its fragrance. Also, try our other varieties: Himalayan, Texas, Virginian.
Topical use: Another effective way to use essential oils is topical application, since essential oils easily penetrate the skin. Once absorbed, they stay in the areas where applied. While essential oils are easily absorbed, using a light massage motion can help increase the blood flow to the area in which essential oils are applied. Likewise, using a carrier oil can also help increase essential oil absorption, especially for dry or flaky skin.
I went to an Essential oils party last week (YL). They had everyone put a little bit of water in a glass, then a drop of oil (I used grapefruit) and then fill the rest with water and drink. I wondered if it was safe since I’m 27 weeks pregnant, but since the leader made no mention of caution (and one of them was also pregnant) I assumed it was ok. Now after doing research, I’m horrified and so worried I have harmed my baby! What are your thoughts? Since grapefruit is on the “safe” list and I only used one drop (and don’t plan to ever again!) do you think it’s ok? I’m completely panicking and so mad at myself for making an assumption.
Essential oils may be applied on the skin (dermal application), inhaled, diffused or taken internally. Each of these methods have safety issues which need to be considered. The potential safety concerns with dermal application will be discussed below. With regard to inhalation, from a safety standpoint, inhalation presents a very low level of risk to most people. Even in a relatively small closed room, and assuming 100% evaporation, the concentration of any essential oil (or component thereof) is unlikely to reach a dangerous level, either from aromatherapy massage, or from essential oil vaporization.4
Price can be an indication that an oil is synthetically reproduced or extended. Chemically reconstructed oils called “Nature Identical” are much cheaper but seldom include all the trace chemicals which might be found in any given specimen of a certain plant material. Used mostly by an industry which accepts a standard of between 51 – 96% accuracy, chemically reconstructed oils are not suitable for therapeutic use.
In response to my request for testing results, the company I reached out to explained that they do testing each month, but if I wanted to review the tests I would need to sign a non-disclosure agreement owing to the proprietary information in the results. I am also guessing that they were not willing to share the results of their testing for other privacy reasons given how competitive this market has become. To receive this information, I would also be required to grant them access to a private Facebook group I manage where the discussion had first sparked my questioning. (I can only assume one of the members of this group approached the company directly asking the questions that were being raised.)
This was such a great education for me, honestly I didn’t know a thing about essential oils, and I am such an avid gardener!! I will look at all my plants differently from now on. I love it that the oils are their essence and life blood. I was looking for something to drop into my drinks while in Peru for 2 months so I don’t get traveler’s tummy or heaven forbid, on-going diarrhea. Would you recommend Grape Seed Oil Extract as being the most reliable or the Thieve’s Oil that I read about on-line. Or generally speaking they are not for internal use which it seems you are saying. Thanks so much.
I was wondering. You said that you should never take essential oils internally. But I’ve always been told that what you can’t tack internally, you shouldn’t put on your skin. The only exception to this rule I can think of would be something that would hurt you digestive system if you swallowed it, but is okay for your body otherwise. Plus some oils are made out of foods, like rosemary, so why cant we eat the oils? Does something bad happen to the oils after processing? If so, then why would you want it on your skin or in the air you breath.

As for blemishes and other skin irritations, there are plenty of options as well. Tea tree oil is an editor-loved remedy for shriveling up zits in a matter of hours, especially since it's one of the only essential oils (along with lavender) that can safely be applied directly to skin. Dab a few drops on a blemish to zap bacteria and soothe any redness. Got angry, inflammed skin from a sunburn, rosacea, or other sensitivities? Mist on some rosewater or a lavender hydrosol for instant relief. 


The action of C. sativum EO against planktonic cells of C. albicans stood out from others EOs showing the lowest MIC values against the oral microorganisms investigated. The crude C. articulatus oil showed the highest inhibition on the cells adherence and consequently in the biofilms formation. The oils from these plants can be considered as new sources of antibacterial agents with great potential against oral pathogens.
"When you smell an essential oil," says Tony Ferrari, Ph.D. in chemistry, "its constituents bind to receptor sites in the nose, which read the aroma molecules and send signals through the olfactory nerve to the limbic system and amygdala in the brain. There are more than 5,000 chemical compounds that make up commonly used oils, each of which binds in a different way to different receptors, so their effects can vary widely."
The pharmacist have the possibility to vote the “best pharmacy partner” within the “OTC-Studie” every year. Gold, silver and bronce medals are distributed in 52 categories. The “OTC-Studie” of the “PharmaRundschau” analyse which products or product families the pharmacies recommend the most to their customers from chosen OTC-indication groups. The reputation of a company and the business policy is for industry, wholesaler and service partner important in the eyes of pharmacies. That’s why the question after the company the pharmacies work best with and would recommend is an indicator for satisfaction of the customers with their market partner.

Industries that use EOs in for-sale products have safety guidelines established to protect consumers from harmful formulations. These organizations often invest their resources in scientific study to be able to accurately determine safe amount guidelines for producers. A list of some can be found in "The Library" at EssentialInfo . weebly . com, though I just discovered a lot of the text turned tiny when I wasn't looking - I'll be sure to fix that really soon.
The Medicinal Oil Association (MOA) was founded to be an independent quality control regulating body for the essential oil industry. It was founded by Dr Jed Adamson ND and Dr Tracy Gibbs PhD. The popularity of and wide spread use of essential oils is similar to the growth of the dietary supplement industry in the early 1990’s but today, just as then, there is no regulatory body to determine safety, purity or misuse of essential oils.
Supercritical carbon dioxide is used as a solvent in supercritical fluid extraction. This method can avoid petrochemical residues in the product and the loss of some "top notes" when steam distillation is used. It does not yield an absolute directly. The supercritical carbon dioxide will extract both the waxes and the essential oils that make up the concrete. Subsequent processing with liquid carbon dioxide, achieved in the same extractor by merely lowering the extraction temperature, will separate the waxes from the essential oils. This lower temperature process prevents the decomposition and denaturing of compounds. When the extraction is complete, the pressure is reduced to ambient and the carbon dioxide reverts to a gas, leaving no residue.
×