Proper methods of growing, harvesting, and distilling are also crucial to maintaining purity. Poor production practices and the development of synthetic essential oil variations suggest that it is impossible to accurately identify a pure essential oil without scientific analysis. Appropriate analysis of the constituents within an essential oil is one of the most challenging and detailed aspects of quality assurance.
What I truly want is to be able to wisely and knowledgably use essential oils for myself and family, believing they are a quality that would benefit our bodies. I understand that there are no offical “therapeutic” standards for essential oils, but is there a solid list of “must have” qualifications that I can look for in a brand and feel comfortable using them–even if they may not be the “best” on the market? Like other nutritional supplements, I may not always be able to afford the “best”–but I do want to use products that are trustworthy, safe and effective.
No, don’t use it on your skin without diluting it. You can mix a drop or two into your moisturizer or into an oil like olive or coconut. Also, for acne and blackheads you also need to look at toxins in the other products you are using and make sure you are exfoliating several times a week. A green clay mask will also help pull toxins out of the skin. Just using rosemary oil without looking at the root causes of acne and blackheads will only go so far.
This is a good starter kit, especially if you don't want to spend a fortune on something that may not be your thing. We don't use all 6 of these, so I'm glad I didn't get suckered into buying a more pricey brand. I've purchased expensive essential oils and less expensive ones like these, and these are a good value. Don't get caught up buying multi-level marketing brands like **terra, just buy what works for you and your budget and enjoy!

research, research, research. Some oils are labeled as Generally Regarded as Safe for ingestion. Get a copy of Higley’s book ” Reference Guide to Essential Oils ” and other guides on how to use your oils. I am not a fan but some people swear by it. The books and research will help you know what you can and cannot ingest, how it is recommended that you ingest it, and so on. Do not let the naysayers frighten you. Learn all you can and use facts to make your decisions. I use EOs daily but I prefer them topically and aromatically. You need to decide for yourself what ways your EOs best work for you.

There are some uses for ingestion that have been discussed here that are perfectly acceptable, and I don't in ant way want to say that all ingestion is bad, but I would be hesitant in just accepting anyone's word for it. I think mainly, most people involved in this craft are concerned that there is so much bad/inaccurate information out there. Please be careful, y friends. As always, use cation, and get a good opinion from someones who has some experience. Be well, Everyone.
Another French contemporary, Dr. Jean Valnet, used therapeutic-grade essential oils to successfully treat injured soldiers during World War II. He then went on to become a world leader in the development of respected aromatherapy practices. The modern use of essential oils has continued to grow incredibly rapidly as health scientists and medical practitioners continue to research and validate the benefits of therapeutic-grade essential oil.
You may have seen some "multi-level marketing" companies that sell essential oils and recruit independent sellers to vend on their behalf—and recruit more sellers beneath them in a sales strategy that resembles a pyramid :)  One of these multi-level marketing companies puts a "certification seal"on their packaging that says "CPTG" or Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade.  This private company actually trademarked this particular term and seal, and designed it to resemble the seals that are from independent bodies.  Since they trademarked it, they are of course the only ones who can use it. Basically, they are pretending like "CPTG" is an official, independent certification, which of course it isn't. 
They may have a third-party testing the purity of their oils, but they would not then certify them as "Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade", first because they don't hold the trademark to use that term, and second, because it's not a legitimate classification of essential oils. They might as well call their oils "Super Awesome Number 1 World's Best Oils", it would mean the same thing. But you probably wouldn't take much stock in that.

doTERRA wanted to create a purity level that goes above and beyond organic. So they created an internal standard called Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade that is verified by 3rd party testing laboratories. They test their oils 7 different ways to make sure that they are pure and safe for therapeutic use. Even though doTERRA essential oils are not “certified organic“(read why in next paragraph), you can be assured that they are a step above organic.

I take Genesis Pure products and a friend recommended an “allergy bomb” recipe, which includes 2 drops each of lemon, lavender, and peppermint, to help my spring allergies. I just went top the local grocery store and bought Aura Cacia oils.. they’re half the price of Genesis Pure and I wanted them that day. Since I’ve been taking them (this is something I’m swallowing) I’ve had high level itching on arms and legs and kind of a rash. Would ingesting impure essential oils cause that? My friend who gave me the recipe thinks I’m just detoxing..?
To be clear, contamination or adulteration - whatever you want to call it - happens. It's happened with almonds, spinach, protein powders, supplements and seemingly daily with processed food. Obviously, we'd hope the brands we know and trust have systems worked out to ensure this doesn't happen. But sometimes it does. The important thing to pay attention to when it does happen is how the company handles it. Do they own it, take responsibility, and put motions in place to improve, telling their customers how they are going to do better? Or do they deny it and start placing blame elsewhere?
This is a great resource. I’ use a variety of essential oils. I have a drawer full. Some from Young Living, Simply Earth, Do Terra and Isagenix. There are many good brands but I think people get nervous about trying new brands especially when they’ve heard from well-meaning friends that only the MLM versions are safe. While I do think MLM brands are tested extensively because they are held to very high standards and don’t want to get shut down there are some non-mlm oil brands you can safely buy especially if you plan to use them in your diffuser. I wouldn’t ingest an oil unless the bottle specifically states you can. For ingesting the brands I use right now are Isagenix and Young Living (I’m sure there are others that are safe but these state they are ingestable). I’ve written many posts about how to use oils and I switch out brands depending on my needs and what I have on hand.
It is important that people research the oils they are using – as not all EO’s are created equally and MANY on the market can be harmful when used improperly. Industry standards are very lax and an EO is only required to have a minimum of 2% essential oil in the bottle to be classified as pure – the rest can be synthetics or fillers. I chose Young Living Essential Oils because I know – without a doubt that from the minute the seed is planted to the minute it goes into the bottle – proper care and precision has been taken to ensure only the highest quality oil on the market. Young Living is the ONLY company in the world who has taken it one step further by having our own farms, doing our own harvesting, cultivating, distilling, testing and bottling of our products as well.
It is important to note that Lavender has been prized for perfumery, cosmetics and natural medicine for thousands of years in many nations. Lavender was one of the fragrant herbs used to make the anointing oil mentioned in the Bible. However, this would have been Lavandula stoechas, not Lavandula angustifolia. The Romans used Lavender in perfumes, cosmetics and herbal remedies. In fact, the word Lavender comes from the Latin “lavare”, meaning “to clean”. However, the Romans would more likely have been using Lavandula latifolia than Lavandula angustifolia.  Lavender was also prized for its scent as well as for its medicinal properties in ancient Persia, but the Persians had Lavandula coronopifolia, not Lavandula angustifolia. When Tutankhamen’s tomb was opened, urns were found which were believed to contain cosmetics scented with Lavender. Lavender was indeed used in ancient Egypt and across northern Africa, but it would more likely have been Lavandula multifida than Lavandula angustifolia. Egyptian Lavender was good enough for the personal care products the Pharoah would be using for all eternity…how inferior to Lavandula angustifolia could it possibly be? If one was to research the use of Lavender throughout the ages, I am confident that most of the information found would refer to Lavandula species other than Lavandula angustifolia.
A pure, natural essential oil is an oil that is extracted from one species of plant from one specific geographical area.  The aroma profile for these oils will vary slightly from season to season and from geographical location to geographical location.  For example the lavender essential oil we sell at Moon Haven is a high altitude lavender grown and distilled in the mountains of France and we feel this is the best quality oil with the most appropriate and consistent scent profile of the plant Lavendula angustifolia.
I went to a seminar on Friday with Dr David K Hill, who was demonstrating his Aromatouch technique. I learnt the Aromatherapy massage as created by Marguerite Maury in the 1970’s, as my Aromatherapy tutor was one of her students in London. There was nothing signicantly different, apart from the oils that were to be used at every stage. One of the blends called Deep Blue ( which does seems to work) contains Wintergreen Camphor, Peppermint, Blue Tansy, and Osmanthus.The other oil to be used was On Guard which contains Wintergreen, Clove Bud, Cinnamon, Eucalyptus and Rosemary. one of the questions asked was” is it safe to be used on a pregnant women?” Dr Hill answered “yes’, and said he would even use these oils in the first trimester. Now I know I may be a little bit rusty, but aren’t oils such as Wintergreen Camphor, Blue Tansy, Osmanthus, Clove Cinnamon,Peppermint, and Rosemary all contraindicated in pregnancy? That statement made me feel uncomfortable.

Essential oils aren’t really oils in the true sense of the word. They are complex mixtures of aromatic compounds extracted from plant material. They have distinct odors, poor solubility in water (a trait they share with true oils), and are extracted from plants by distillation and cold pressing. Common examples include lavender, peppermint, tea tree and eucalyptus, but you’ll find hundreds more.
I am still confused about this whole internal taking thing. how can several companies say their eos are 100% and yet some be safe to take internally and others not. also, I have been using NOW eos for a couple of years. you state that they are ok for cleaning but not for therapeutic reasons. can you explain this further? they say they are 100% pure and they seem to be working. would these other companies eos work better or differently? thanks
Anyone who has read my previous- I use Nature's Gift because I love them, I highly recommend them. They meet all the criteria-(No affiliation/ commissions here- I just trust them and have never had better experiences with any other oils I have used) and I blend all my own oils by hand. I like knowing I am helping people. I often tell people I blend for that they are paying me for my research and knowledge, and not the oils themselves. I offer them for a reasonable price and I'm not out to make money, but make a difference in other people's lives. And who ever's lives I can impact, I do so because THAT is the reward for me. NOT making money. Yes, its nice, but not why I got involved with this in the first place, much like the decision to join the Army. Please form an educated opinion, research until you're exhausted, and by all means attempt to get certified if you want to actually continue to supply others with essential oils and treatments for their ailments.
Simple smells such as lavender, chamomile, and rosewater may help keep you calm. You can breathe in or rub diluted versions of these oils on your skin. Scientists think they work by sending chemical messages to parts of the brain that affect mood and emotion. Although these scents alone won’t take all your stress away, the aroma may help you relax.
Our in-house laboratory is staffed by highly qualified chemists and technicians. It employs state-of-the-art analytical equipment that allows us to perform highly specialized analyses, such as Gas Chromatography and Infrared Spectrometry. We use our own analysis results to confirm specification sheet reports and certificates of analyses received from 3rd party outside laboratories and vendors. As always, when it comes to Essential Oils, individual practitioners and consumers will decide for themselves which variety of a flower or leaf produces the essential oil that best suits their particular need. With NOW pure essential oils, you can be assured that you have the real thing.
Hi. Faith. Thanks for sharing about NOW essential oils. In the last two months, I have been learning about EOs and bought several NOW oils at GNC, with the initial intent of using them in more natural cleaning products, getting away from many that are chemical-based and hard to breathe when using. I cannot say that they have had any health benefits for me yet, as I am fortunate to not be prone to a lot of illness, but I have bought NOW grapeseed oil and have used lavender in it on my skin, and have used peppermint for headaches, but I am still learning. I did, however, just purchase the NOW diffuser, two actually, which just arrived this past Saturday afternoon, and I have been enjoying blending oils for scent.
If you do your research you will find that the ISO spec for lavender lists the acceptable camphor up to 1.5% , depending on origin, and the British Pharmacopoeia lists camphor at max 1.2%. My standard at EOU is that camphor, 1,8-cineole and borneol should all be about 1% or less in true lavender essential oil. My standard is based on samples taken from all over the world as well as from many distillations that I have personally done on many different varieties of Lavandula.
Meanwhile, ill-informed at-home users may misuse them. One group of concerned aromatherapists, at the Atlantic Institute for Aromatherapy, began collecting injury reports online. Since the fall of 2013, it has found more than 268, ranging from mild rashes and anaphylactic shock to internal chemical burns from using oils to treat vaginal yeast infections. In 2017 alone, 55 people, including five children and two pregnant women, reported serious reactions. (The organization estimates that fewer than 5 to 10% of adverse reactions are reported.)
I have read quite a bit about YL and DoTerra and several other companies. The information available seems to suggest that Mr Young (founder of YL) is of questionable repute and has been caught out as a fraud selling a few different “natural” healing methods in the past. The people who founded DoTerra used to work for YL but were fired (or chose to leave) when they began to question YL practices, including the establishment of the Ecuadorian processing plant. No accusations were made but there were implications that perhaps what YL are actually doing is not aligned with what they are preaching. I was very interested to read the earlier comment that YL oils left stains on construction paper using the testing method suggested in the article.
Those like myself involved in related holistic fields leave those kinds of diagnoses and preparations to producers who must adhere to their industry's self-regulatory safety standards and have the proper training to perform this service, like studies in anatomy, biology, pharmacology, physiology, pharmakonetics, and industry-related ethics and safety.

Thank you, Marcia!!! A friend asked me just this morning about the “Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade” oils she had seen, and my first question was “Certified by whom?” Mr. Wolfert may be correct in saying that the phrase is trademarked, and not to be interpreted that the OILS are certified by anyone, but the so-called “average user” is not going to know that. They are going to assume, wrongfully, that SOME official body has certified that DoTerra has the world’s most perfect oils. Somewhere on TV I saw the phrase “puffery”… Shame on any organization who has to stoop to such deliberately misleading marketing tactics to sell their product. Obviously the truth isn’t enough, some folks have to embellish and mislead.

Teresa, I’m an audiologist, and it sounds like you have intermittent tinnitus. Using oils on your neck isn’t going to affect your Eustachian tube, your Eustachian tube drains up by your adenoids. Intermittent tinnitus is pretty common, but it wouldn’t hurt to get a baseline audiogram done. If you have it only in one ear, it would be a good idea to get it checked to ensure it isn’t a symptom of a bigger concern. Good luck!
General safety guidelines include: avoid application of known dermal irritant essential oils on any inflammatory or allergic skin condition; avoid undiluted application; avoid application on open or damaged skin; and dilute known dermal irritants with appropriate vegetable oil or other carrier. If you suspect a client has sensitive skin, perform a skin patch test. Table 1 lists some common essential oils considered to be dermal irritants.

I have bought dozens of essential oils from Piping Rock. Their prices are simply the best, especially considering the free shipping and “Crazy Deals” they offer and change almost daily. You can get 15 ml of 100% neroli oil for about $15, and it’s lovely! They also have a 15 ml bottle of 100% West Indian sandalwood for $39.95, and it smells GREAT. A 15 ml bottle of 100% pure cistus oil is about $13 or $14. It can’t be beat! Many of the normally cheaper oils (peppermint, orange, cedarwood, tangerine, tea tree, pine etc.) are wonderfully priced too -almost a steal. Their rose, jasmine and tuberose blends did not disappoint scent-wise (they weren’t too weak at all). Their oils come in glass bottles with stoppers and pretty labels. I was scared at first because of how cheap their prices are, but I’m glad I took the chance. On top of the great products, they ship SUPER FAST, package well, and my orders are always complete and correct. So happy with this company. Lastly, by signing up with the http://www.mrrebates.com website (it’s free), and accessing piping rock from there, you will get a %10 discount on your purchase, which you eventually receive as a refund in cash that you can have added to your PayPal account. I’ve earned over $50 in refunds! I’ve seen this % go up and down by a little from time to time, but the average is 10% (which it is as of today, 5/8/14). Maybe wait for a “free shipping day” and try some of the cheaper oils to test the waters first. Even when you have to pay for shipping (for orders under $40), the shipping is a flat $3.95 rate!

Ryan is an athlete, animal lover and vegan food fanatic! Ryan is also a sponsored Posha Green super-heavyweight bodybuilder. Ryan aims to inspire others to set and achieve their goals in the weight room the classroom, sports and in real life. Ryan stands as a testament to the health benefits of a healthy vegan diet! On his website he offers online coaching and nutrition programs. Check it out!

Essences made from the resin of trees are often some of the more ancient of essences; they help alleviate emotional and physical suffering and help to release deeply held beliefs that no longer serve us. The also help us to access emotions that have been deeply repressed. They are about expression…making external (through voice and writing) what has been internal (thoughts, feelings). In the physical realm, they are often antiviral and antitumor.
There’s nothing like 100% pure, therapeutic-grade essential oils. Ellia offers unmatched aromatherapy oils to help promote mental clarity, aid in helping you relax and sleep, boost energy, inspire inner balance, and purify the air around you. Choose a beautiful diffuser to complement your décor, then add our best essential oils to release the fragrance of lavender, orange, or spruce into the air. Essential oils have a variety of uses, from topical to household cleaning. You can mix essential oils with carrier oils or even use a roll-on to apply directly to your skin. Our signature aroma blends can help promote relaxation and energy, and even keep you centered. Ellia’s essential oil scents include varieties of citrus, mint, floral, herbs, spices, and wood. Give your mind and soul a break with Ellia essential oils. Just breathe in … and be.

Essential oils, however, are distilled and used not only in holistic aromatherapy, but as mentioned previously, are also distilled for use in the personal fragrancing, home fragrancing, cosmetic and in the food/beverage/flavoring industries. In these industries where purchasers of essential oils use them for mass production, there is far less need for "pure" essential oils and far greater need for consistent, standardized essential oils that do not change from shipment to shipment.
This curated list of the top 10 best essential oil brands contains oil companies discovered by myself during my training towards becoming a Certified Aromatherapist. This is a list, not a ranking. The essential oil brand that is best for you will depend on a mix of things: how you’ll use the essential oils; how many of them you need; and how much you’re comfortable paying for your oils.
Second Paragraph: EOs are used in medical preparations. I don't say they aren't. I wrote about how that's done for the citrus supplement limonene: "Because limonene itself is a solvent, ingesting a tincture or essential oil containing it can irritate the digestive tract. So the d-limonene dietary supplement is usually produced from orange peel oil (which is typically comprised of 90% or more limonene), added to an emulsifying agent (like glycerin), and contained in a capsule to help prevent this irritation." (from https://hubpages.com/health/Essential-Oil-Safety-P... ). In regards to anise EO, the National Library of Medicine classifies it as a class 4 "very toxic" substance with a probably lethal dose as small as a tsp. If you're going to eat that or feed it to the kids, you'd better know how to dilute it properly. (from: http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs... )

In order to assess the integrity of the microbial cells, biofilms were developed in a Lab-Tek TM coverslip chambers (Nunc) as described above, and treated with standard drugs and EOs at 1 mg/mL. The samples were washed twice with 3% glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and fixed in glutaraldehyde 0.15 M 2.5% (v/v) at room temperature for 12 h. The dehydrated cells were submitted to sequential baths of ethanol at concentrations of 50%, 70%, 90% and absolute ethanol twice, until the dried at the critical point, then coated with gold in a Metalizer and observed using a Scanning Electron Microscope (Jeol model JSM 5600 Lv) [24].
Vibrational energy in molecules refers to the the vibration of bound atoms within a particular molecule. For example, if we look at a very simple molecule like carbon dioxide, we can measure the vibration or frequency of what is referred to the carbonyl stretch (the stretching motion of the double bond between the carbon and the oxygen atoms). The larger the molecule is the more vibrational motions it will have. Molecules in essential oils would have many different bond vibrations going on because even the smaller molecules (monoterpenes) consist of 10 carbon atoms and 16 hydrogen atoms. Thus all essential oil molecules would have many different vibrations going on simultaneously and each different type of vibrational motion in each different bond would have its own characteristic frequency. These vibrational frequencies in molecules are measured using infrared (IR) spectroscopy because energy in the IR range of the electromagnetic spectrum is what is required to cause these vibrations. The magnitude of Infrared radiation is in the 10,000,000,000,000 to 400,000,000,000,000 Hertz range!
I apologize that this is vague, but again, when you email customer service and get a response from legal counsel, or have a phone call scheduled with their communications lead and the call is controlled by legal, well, it's best to say less. And really, it's not that important when we start to look at what we actually want in our essential oils: top quality, pure oil.
The volatile constituents of the EOs oils were determined using a Hewlett-Packard 6890 gas chromatograph, equipped with a HP-5975 mass selective detector and HP-5MS capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.25 μm diameter). GC and GC–MS were carried out using split (1:30) injection, with injector temperature set at 220°C, column at 60°C, a heating ramp of 3°C min−1 to a final temperature of 240°C, and the MS and FID detectors set at 250°C. Helium was used as the carrier gas at 1 mL min−1. The GC–MS electron ionization system was set at 70 eV. A sample of the EO was dissolved in ethyl acetate for the analyses. Retention indices (RI) relative to n- alkanes were calculated by linear interpolation. Oils components were identified by comparision of experimental RI with reference data [18], by maching mass spectra with NIST software 05® reference spectra and by injection of authentic standards, when available.

There has never been a documented instance of an anti-body response (i.e. sensitization) to an essential oil. Essential oil antibodies have never been found or detected in anyone. Unless sensitization occurs and antibodies are produced and stored in the body, there can be no allergic reaction. Therefore, we can state unequivocally that essential oils are not and cannot be allergens. Sometimes people do have allergy-like reactions but these are no allergenic in nature. They are detox reactions.
One thing I like about Rose Mountain and Organic Infusions is that I can get 30 ml bottles for the EO’s that I use most frequently. They also, both, have a large selection of other products and I’ve found their oils to be good quality. Organic Imfusions labels its products as Certified Organic or just organic, meaning the farm hasn’t been certified. Rocky Mountai Oils has a good selection of oils and blends but not a lot else. Some of their singles I really love but I got a peppermint that smells like cat pee to me. For what it is worth, I still use all 3 of these companies.
Essences made from the resin of trees are often some of the more ancient of essences; they help alleviate emotional and physical suffering and help to release deeply held beliefs that no longer serve us. The also help us to access emotions that have been deeply repressed. They are about expression…making external (through voice and writing) what has been internal (thoughts, feelings). In the physical realm, they are often antiviral and antitumor.
There are many popular, quality essential oils, including those that are Certified USDA Organic, therapeutic grade and 100% pure—with no fillers, bases or additives. For example, being Certified USDA Organic is important for some people because the organic certification can be traced back clear to the seed and plant. Every handler of the product must be certified as well. Additionally, no prohibited pesticides or other toxins are used for Certified USDA Organic products.
Thanks for the informative article on essential oils! I want to know if there are any essential oils that can be applied on my skin (face) just before my skin is exposed to direct sunlight? I know that the skin where citrus oils are applied should not be exposed to direct sunlight for few hours after application. That’s the only question that I am concerned with because I am very interested in concocting a facial oil moisturizer after reading an article of yours that is about making a “3-ingredient facial oil moisturizer”.
Hi Francis – Food grade oils are approved for use as food flavorings, though it’s a mistake to believe that they are therefore also approved as internal medicines. They are known by the designation FCC (Food Chemicals Codex). Pharmaceutical grade oils are usually known by the designation BP (British Pharmacopoeia) or USP (U.S Pharmacopeia). The two standards are the same. None of the grades particularly applies to the use of essential oils in aromatherapy, and many pharmaceutical grade oils are only approved as flavorings – to make a medicine taste better. Therapeutic grade is a great idea, it just doesn’t exist yet!
Thank you for all this info. While a patient in the hospital, I would sprinkle a mix of lavender, eucalyptus, and peppermint oils in my pillow. It helped with my headaches and allowed me to relax. The nurses kept coming into my room just to inhale the wonderful scents. They took such great care of me that, after I was discharged, i went home and made 50 bottles of the same mixtures in cobalt blue bottles with roller balls. They loved them so much! They use them at home and at work. Being a nurse myself, I understand what they go through on a daily bases and how much these oils will benefit them. Even one of my doctors took several bottles I’ve made to give to patients!

Hi there! I know in your list of 21 facts you said these oils should not be ingested…I have heard otherwise about a few specific brands. What were your true thoughts on this? Do you or have you used any oils internally? Or anyoneelse on here maybe? Really wanting to heal from the inside as well as using these topically. Thanks in advance! I’m still pretty new at this so any input or advice would be great!


When you cook with an essential oil, you diffuse it into the food. Typically you only use 1 to 2 drops per recipe. Lorannoils.com reports that , "in recipes calling for grated citrus zest or peel start with 1/8 teaspoon essential oil in place of 1 tablespoon of zest", and that, "[f]or most oils, one drop replaces a teaspoon of dried herb or spice". Anyone who cooks with dried herbs and spices knows that 1 teaspoon or less typically suffices to flavor baked dishes, soups, sauces, and entire pots of stew. That's because the flavoring agents, including their volatile essential oils, seep out of the dried plant material and into your dish, adding its flavor. One teaspoon of dried herb is also the serving size recommended for most teas and herbal teas.
In looking at your map, it would only be fair to mention that Young Living oils are multi-level marketed (as are DoTerra). I feel this explains their dominance. I’m sure the quality is there, but those are two brands I refuse to purchase because I feel they are WAY overpriced and over-pushed. I have read many essential oil blogs and narrowed my purchases mainly to Mountain Rose Herbs and a few Rocky Mountain Oils. I live in Tennessee and have them shipped to me. I have run into Whole Foods and bought a couple NOW oils in a pinch and would also purchase Edens Garden or Plant Therapy oils locally, in a pinch. Thank you for your research and sharing!
In aromatherapy and perfumery, Frankincense Essential Oil is considered an exclusive and highly desirable ingredient. Since ancient times, it has been used as incense and perfume, and as an exquisite cosmetic ingredient. It is considered the most valued oil for skincare products. This oil retains the sweet, warm and woody notes of the resin from which it is extracted.
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