Plus, I don’t care how wonderful an EO is, I don’t think a certain combo is going to make someone “Thankful” or give them “Couraqe.” Those are personality traits, not a response to treatment. Seems a bit hokey to me. I just gave her the catalog back and didn’t say much. The MLM system is designed to make people antagonize their friends into feeling obligated to purchase stuff.

You start your article out by bashing on Young Living specifically but later on mention other companies. I suspect you didn't research how other countries utilize EO for this wordy "article". Also, the FDA just approved a few products from YL as "medicine".... Do you know what that means? Do you realize almost all medicine came from plants and herbs to begin with. If someome choices, makes a personal choice to ingest EO after doing their own research who are you going to blame? I agree with another commentor that I've never seen anyone say Take 10 drops or some asinine amount Internally. 1-2 drop per 2 liter. Medicine and prescription drug overdoses have seriously hurt, damaged and killed many more people than natural medicine ever has. Have you visited the Young Living farms? Actually seen how the oils are picked and distilled? Know that the farms and seeds are organic (by at least 10 years if not more). Do you know anyone who actually uses used oils from YL or DT? Do you know where these companies get their ingriedents and why it eould make a difference of Owning the farms versus buying from a third party? Do you look up to big pharma when they make asthma drugs that cause aggression and suicidal ideations in children? Or antidepressants that could cause suicidal or homicidal thoughts in adults? You think the people who get thode side effects shouldn't have any other options? Where does your hate come from? How have you been harmed personally? Please share your agenda instead of scaring people away from a natural alternative.
In short: DO NOT TAKE ESSENTIAL OILS INTERNALLY unless they have been prescribed to you individually by a qualified and clinically-trained medical professional or Clinical Registered Aromatherapist. When working with essential oils you are ultimately playing with chemistry; if you do not know the specific chemistry of the specific oils, and what that specific collection of chemical constituents in that oil can do to your body, then avoid internal administration and stick with the aromatic processes.

Industries that use EOs in for-sale products have safety guidelines established to protect consumers from harmful formulations. These organizations often invest their resources in scientific study to be able to accurately determine safe amount guidelines for producers. A list of some can be found in "The Library" at EssentialInfo . weebly . com, though I just discovered a lot of the text turned tiny when I wasn't looking - I'll be sure to fix that really soon.
This is a must-have dietary or culinary oil, Febuary said. They both recommend starting your day with lemon water, using a drop of lemon oil and a tiny pinch of salt. Add a drop to savory foods like fish or chicken recipes that call for lemon juice, and use it to create vinaigrettes and marinades to add a bright flavor to summer salads and grilling.
Hi i have just recently seen doTerra but have been using Amazing Scents for a while. I would like to know how they compare. They both claim they source their products from around the world where they are best produced. They say doTerra is safe to consume internally whereas Amazing Scents are only for external use. Can someone give me some insight about Amazing Scents and whether EO are safe to ingest.
The products that ZEVA Essential Oils offers are 100% ISO certified essential oils derived from plant sources, and manufactured to contain active phytochemicals from plants without fillers or chemicals. ZEVA only uses oils certified by the Medicinal Oil Association, and we source our plants from quality suppliers throughout the world. However, because of the differences in organic certification from country to country, and even from one state to another in the U.S., it is not possible to acquire raw materials that are all certified organic. We do check our plant supplies for chemical residues in the form of solvents, herbicides, pesticides, and extenders so we can offer products that are as pure as possible, often exceeding the standards for certified organic products.
Have you ever wondered, “What are the best essential oil brands”? Who should you buy your essential oils from and why? Those are very good questions! There are variations in quality, standards of production, company culture, price, and product selection among many of the popular essential oil brands available today. I want to highlight what sets apart one essential oil company over another, and which ones would be the best essential oil brands to start buying from.
This whole topic and the comments are just wild! I actually had to chuckle. I recently became a certified aromatherapist, and enjoy giving treatments, with good results (I myself even feel good after giving a treatment). I won’t even say what oils I use because I see it’s a no-win situation here (I will say that I don’t sell any oils). Anyone who claims expertise and prefers either Young Living or doTERRA is bashed then for using/buying what they like (why wouldn’t you buy/sell/use what you think works?) Anyone who points out the flaws in MLM or the “certification” process is bashed (but no government certification even exists, and MLM is just another business technique). Anyone supporting either doTERRA or Young Living against each other is bashed (lot of mystery about THAT one!). Anyone who shares any opinion at all is quickly rounded upon, haha! Well, it seems the bottom line is this: in our culture, we have all been more or less steeped in the allopathic, scientific model of medicine. We want mathematical, statistical and replicable proofs of any and every method or product used for health. That just can’t happen with the use of essential oils. What did people do before the “scientific method”? They learned what worked by trial and error, observation and sharing of information. They didn’t die off; they managed to stay healthy enough to continue to populate the world, that’s for sure. The greatest boon to the allopathic medical field was (re) learning about bacteria (and very reluctantly at that). The “scientific” method and allopathic medicine has been responsible for a lot of pain, suffering, and deaths, but we don’t hear much about that because they are the ones in charge right now. “Natural” or “alternative” healing is giving them a run for their money because people are becoming more aware of the flaws in the scientific, allopathic, FDA approved, graded and statistically “proven” methods of medical practice. We will never be able to get government backing of alternative treatments like EO’s, because their most basic components are non-replicative ingredients. For instance, every batch of EO’s can come from plants in different areas, during different seasons, etc., which will STILL produce effective, but not replicable batches. The very definition of “natural” includes something that hasn’t been “scientifically” modified and manipulated to the point where it is just like every other “batch.” But people have been using EO’s for thousands of years with positive effects. And if you’re going to complain about money-grubbing, consider the fact that health care in the US is 17% of the national GDP! The allopathic medicine industry needs SICK people, so consider that when you feel the need to demand FDA approval for anything. FDA approval is no guarantee of safety-just do a little research on the interesting history of drugs and health/surgical products that are now being bombarded with lawsuits, have been responsible for deaths, have had to be recalled or have mysteriously NOT been pulled when actual approval has never been completed. I personally question exactly what their approval means-pay offs, pressure from Big Pharma, political/business favors? And don’t tell me it doesn’t happen! Providers of alternative treatments don’t need sick people because much of their practice involves health MAINTENANCE. So, FDA supporters, give it a rest. Supporters of holistic, natural, etc. treatments, don’t bother trying to win over the “scientific” minded people because you are wasting your time, unless one of them shows up at your door needing your help (which you know does happen). The argument is often actually an emotional/cultural/ego thing. Follow whatever path gets you where you’re going. Sometimes we find that our paths cross and we need each other.
Dr Gary G. Kohls is a retired physician from Duluth, MN, USA. In the decade prior to his retirement from medicine, he had spent the last decade practicing what could best be described as “holistic (non-drug) mental health care”. Dr Kohls has been actively involved in peace, justice and nonviolence issues for much of his adult life and, since he retired, he has written a weekly column for the Duluth Reader, an alternative newsweekly magazine (www.readerduluth.com). His columns mostly deal with the dangers of American fascism, corporatism, militarism, racism, malnutrition, psychiatry and other movements that threaten American democracy and civility.
It's not an instant favorite (unlike Artemisia pallens and Inula graveolens), although I typically grow to like EO's once my body has had a chance to think them over and assimilate the new information. I gave it 5 stars for three reasons: It is unbelievably intense and lasting, which is how it is described around the web. It smells nothing like valerian, which I've heard people complaining gets substituted for the more-expensive vetiver. I've smelled a lot of valerian, and I just don't detect any of that here, so I'd say this hasn't been cut with anything. And despite washing with (unscented) soap and rinsing with isopropyl alcohol, the fragrance has not changed, it has only gotten a little weaker--I can't stand scents that change when they are watered down.
I have a question about allergies. I am not actually allergic to any food but I have oral allergy syndrome from having hay fever. Certain fresh veggies and fruits cause burning and itching in my mouth and sometimes other worse symptoms. I can’t eat avocados. Generally when these foods are slightly cooked or overly ripe I can have them. I’ve been wondering about using essential oils with avocado oil. I’ve had weird reactions with raw almonds but not roasted. It’s so weird! I’m weary of using almond or avocado carrier oils but I like the skin benefits of them. Any advice?
A first trademark has been registered (as a word mark) CPTG also by DoTERRA Holdings, LLC, 1145 South 800 East, Ste. 134,  Orem, UT 84057.  Filed on March 31, 2008, published for opposition on June 10, 2008 and official registration granted on May 9, 2009. Under the trademark registration, they show application to the following products: Essential oils; Essential oils for household use; Essential oils for personal use; Lavender oil; Massage oil; Massage oils; Natural essential oils; Aromatherapy oils; Bath oils; Body oils; Cosmetic oils; Cosmetic oils for the epidermis; Essential oils for flavoring beverages; Essential oils for food flavorings; Essential oils for use in manufacturing of gelcaps and other dietary supplements; Essential oils for use in the manufacture of scented products; Oils for cleaning purposes; Oils for toiletry purposes; Skin and body topical lotions, creams and oils for cosmetic use; Food flavorings prepared from essential oils; Oils for perfumes and scents; Peppermint oil; Perfume oils; Tanning oils.

Well said, Marcia. I sell essential oils and I am so tired of people with their “therapeutic grade” and purity labels when they have absolutely no evidence of a sort. Recently, I was on Facebook where a gentleman leveled that he buys from only one source because all the essential oils in stores are adultrated. Hate to say this, but many people don’t bother checking things out. They hear the right lingo and they put doctors and other so-called professionals. Having had so many people I know try to suck me into one MLM scheme or another, I know well their basic set up. They patent these phrases and whatnot, but actually, the emphasis is on bringing people in, not quality. Anyone can slap a patented label on an oil, but I sincerely doubt that they’ve done any kind of real research into the oils they sell. Sounds like they’re trying to elbow in on Young Living territory. Most people who set up MLMs are about money, they amble from one idea to the next. The get a few know-it-alls to back them up, if they’re that lucky, and they sucker people in with making money. I have a friend suckered into this Juice Plus stuff and the fluff she spouts about it. Anything to sell a product. When you research most of their claims they’re chocked full of misstatements, fabrications and outright lies. They haven’t done nearly the amount of research they claimed to have, they just put a lot of money into making the videos and charts. I’m sick of it all.
Much of my frustration comes from mlm companies proclaiming that THEIR oils are the best and that therapeutic grade means everything. Because there are not alot of distilleries around the world, many of us are getting our oils from the exact same places. Yet MLM’s tend to jack their prices up to over double in some cases, and use their claims as being the best to fortify the price increase. I do feel for consumers though. It is hard to know who to trust. I know of quite a few wonderful companies out there, besides mine that have wonderful, well priced oils. Yes, as you said, you will also pay for quality, but you need to trust who that supplier is. MLM’s will always have higher prices because of their structure. While that bothers me, it is their exclusivity that bothers me more, especially when I know we are sourcing from the same places.
For the last 15-20 years, essential oil therapy’s demand for clean, high quality oils has been stimulated by scientific analysis and research. The community has made some impact on the production and distribution practices of the worldwide essential oil industry. Everyone using essential oils in therapies as integrative medicine are creating a niche market for a new generation of essential oils. Analysis by and for therapists will continue to have positive influence on essential oil purity, quality, discovery and treatment.
Take the lemon oil in a styrofoam cup demonstration for example. A few drops of pure lemon oil eats right through the cup. Most would say I'm not eating that, because somewhere along the way they earned an appreciation for self-preservation. Kind of like when you don't have to chase your toddler around all day anymore - after a few bumps and bruises, junior learns not to run off the side of a cliff.
Let's examine some convincing arguments about spotting inferior and potentially adulterated oils by their packaging and cost. One Young Living rep claims, "[i]t is not possible to import the finest Frankincense resin ... then distill and bottle it for $20 per 1/2 oz." The rep convincingly suggests that prices lower than those of the Young Living oils, along with labels warning against their internal use, must mean the oil is inferior and/or adulterated with toxic chemicals.
Purity is a major issue when using essential oils, particularly if you are using them therapeutically, internally or topically.  The most important issue is to know your company.  What type of testing do they do?  Do they test all batches?  Are the oils grown indiginously?  How are they harvested?  If your oil company cannot answer these questions to your satisfaction, then use another company.  In my opinion, there are a few companies that have consistently high quality oils.  Good luck!
I've been a member of the National Association of Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA) for a number of years. Upon renewing my membership several years ago, I spotted that their membership application/renewal form, at that time, prohibited membership to those companies that use these terms. It was that policy that lead me to then take a fresh look at the terms therapeutic grade and aromatherapy grade and realize how confusing these terms can be to consumers. Having said that, I have noticed that NAHA, under different leadership, no longer includes the statements on their applications that prohibit membership to companies that use these terms.

I personally have used essential oils as a massage therapist for over 22 years, and have used oils from many companies… Young Living, Aura Cacia, organic, no-name oils that I’ve purchased from various websites, and most recently Doterra. It doesn’t matter if a company is an MLM, mom and pop, corporation or anything else for that matter….what matters is whether or not their product is GOOD!


There are several variables when growing plants for essential oils—weather, altitude, the time of year the plant was harvested, and even the time of day the plant was harvested. However, Dr. Burke says the processing of the oil is at least, if not more, important than growing the plant. There are specific processing procedures, depending on the species of plant. Steam distillation is the most common for extracting essential oils. “The expression method (or cold-pressing) is used to extract oils from citrus fruits because the heat from steam distillation damages the citrus oils,” explains Dr. Axe. A newer method growing in popularity is the carbon dioxide extraction, which uses carbon dioxide to carry the oil away from the plant. This method is used for oils such ginger, clover, turmeric, frankincense, and myrrh.

Hi Crunchy Betty, I love your blog and recently bought a whole bunch of carrier oils along with Lavender 40/42 essential oil . I didn’t realise this wasn’t the same as Lavender essential oil and used it (diluted with jojoba oil) on my face – the next morning I had tiny bumps all over my face which were red and very itchy, with slight swelling! Do you know what the difference between these two different oils are, and if the 40/42 is more dangerous to use than the other?  
I apologize for not responding to the new comments on this post from 2009 and hadn’t realized they had been submitted. Obviously this subject has come up again and people are searching the net looking for answers. Tim, I’ve been working on that blog post; it’s languishing as other priorities have pushed it further down the to-do pile. Tammy, you are right that it is complicated and not an easy task to simplify for the person who has not studied . . . both aromatherapy and the aspects surrounding the essential oil trade. I will get it closer to the top of the list now that I see how desirable this information might be to many of you. Karen, I’m glad you enjoyed our products. My intent is not to “bash” any one company, but I will continue to interject facts as I know them that might be helpful to those I believe are being misled. Danika, you make a very good point that the MLM business model is not necessarily the culprit itself when it comes to unethical business practices. I happen to believe it isn’t the best business model, but that’s another discussion . . . thanks to all of you for taking the time to share your thoughts.
When you compare the environmental impact of growing feed corn, thousands of TONs are grown by a single farm just to feed a few cows. Estimates of what we grow so we can eat beef or drink milk are as follows: 2800 lbs of corn to get a single cow to slaughter weight of approx 12-1300 lbs. Or, in the case of hay being fed to milkers, it takes 28 lbs of 88% dry matter to feed one 1200 lb lactating cow a day or 3.2 tons for one herd of 200 cows a day! And most feed corn is grown using pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizer along with regular watering during periods of low precipitation. I’m no expert but my guess is that as long as essential oils do not become a “priority” industry with outrageous claims, we are only enjoying what the planet has to offer in a sustainable level. Buy more local vegetables/fruits, eat organic, and consume less meat and you will be helping the environment much more that the average US citizen does. 😉
I'm a huge cinnamon fan. I gravitate towards cinnamon scented anything. I've been so disappointed in the other brands of cinnamon oils I've tried - they were usually too spicy, with almost a musky note to them - and I literally just sat and inhaled my GH cinnamon for about ten minutes, straight, because it was perfect! Exactly what I was looking for. The Sweet Orange was also divine! It smelled so fresh and pure! I love mixing it with the cinnamon in my diffuser. And the lavender...Also my favorite of the brands and types I've tried. I think I have them all, from Bulgarian to French to Kashmir, but this 40/20 lavender is wonderful! It's a strong scent, but it's soft and sweet, not at all cloying.

Hi I like this post but I’m still confused so 100% essential oil is not to be ingested? The reason I’m asking this is I am wanting to make raw chocolates with peppermint oil a lady and she is not qualified at all she just works at a organic shop she told me that it’s fine to use the oil in very small amounts! Like peppermint and that’s just it i use 100% eucalyptus oil for cleaning my bathroom and it states on the bottle POISON!


Essential oils rich in aldehydes (e.g., citronellal, citral) and phenols (e.g., cinnamic aldehyde, eugenol) may cause skin reactions. Essential oils rich in these constituents should always be diluted prior to application to the skin. According to Schnaubelt, “diluting such oils so that the resulting solution becomes non-irritant, may require diluting them to concentrations much lower than in normal circumstances. Another option is to blend such irritant oils asymmetrically with other essential oils, which mitigate their irritant effects.”3


Using a special type of Mass Spectroscopy, it is possible to determine which isotopes are present in an essential oil constituent and at what amounts. If sourced from the same location, every constituent in an essential oil should have the same ratio of isotopes. If a particular constituent has an isotopic profile different than that of the other constituents, then the quality control analyst will know that the oil contains an adulteration.
As is pointed out in the article EOs are not really “Oils” in the sense that they lack the lipid content necessary to make them a true oil. That is why we need carrier oils – that is what allows the EOs to be absorbed into the skin and thus into the cellular level. The carrier picks up the EO and transports it through the lipid barrier of the cells where they work. At a guess the carrier acts as a buffer in the bloodstream limiting the potential irritation of the EO to the bloodstream.

By now it is no secret that the "Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade" label is a clever marketing ploy developed by essential oil marketing companies in the 1990s to convince you that their oils are the highest grade available, and better than all others on the market. Since coming under fire the phrasing has evolved and changed a bit amongst the individual companies, but you get the idea. These official sounding claims of purity are the primary reason MLM essential oil reps cite for why their company's oils are safe to ingest straight, and all others probably aren't. They're also the go-to rebuttal they use to overcome your hesitation of eating such a super-concentrated medicinal substance, assuring you that it is the extremely high purity and potentcy of their essential oils that makes them safe to ingest—the very same reason reputable sources advise against it.


We carry several varieties of Chamomile Essential Oil. The German variety is considered to be the most popular of all the Chamomiles and has an impeccable reputation among holistic practitioners. The German Chamomile is believed to be one of the most highly reputed oils for topical use. Chamomile Essential Oil contains azulene, which gives the oil a beautiful deep blue color. The scent of this oil is mild and sweet, similar to apples, and often has a medicinal aroma with very faint bittersweet notes.
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